Doppler

4.1 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 4 hours and 37 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: StorySide AB
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 17 Sept. 2012
  • Language: Swedish
  • ASIN: B009TA1YNE

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
Doppler isn't a straight-forward read, so it doesn't get a straight-forward review. Have you ever thought about walking away from everything you know - society, family, job, community - with just a few possessions and starting again? Doppler has. Or at least after his cycling accident, that's what he does. It isn't clear as to whether the accident is the reason - is it a head injury? or it's just an awakening? But he goes. To the woods. To be alone and live a simple life of a longed for solitary boredom.

But he doesn't find it easy. He's hungry, the summer fruits have run out, the locals have started putting locks on the doors to stop him stealing food, and he kills an elk. He's not moved far enough away from his former home to either avoid people coming to see him or to avoid the pull of his former life. The elk has a calf and, with some hesitation - Doppler adopts him and calls him Bongo, after his own recently-deceased father, whose name wasn't Bongo...

After a brief period of contentment, things start to go wrong. People impinge. Doppler obtains a follower who mimics his moves. His pregnant wife tries to pull him back into the life he turned his back on. It's not what he hoped for...

Nothing is quite clear in Doppler. It raises lots of issues - family, loneliness, mental breakdown, death and rebirth - but doesn't solve any of them. And why should it? Good books make you think about things. Doppler does that in spades. And it's warm and human and sad and touching. And laugh out loud funny in places. If you need a quiet 160-odd page break from the family at Christmas - without actually heading for the woods - this is a good book to take you there.
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By Lola TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 22 Mar. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Ah Erlend Loe, I was forever amused by his "Volvo Lastvagnar" (sadly, not translated into English), and was hoping that "Doppler" will deliver the same kind of sarcasm and striking humour. And it kinda did, but I was disappointed.

Loe's original, dark-humoured narrative is recognisable in this tale of an unhappy and self-diagnosed "failed" man, who one day drops everything (i.e. his bourgeois Oslo existence) and goes to live in the woods in the manner of Thoreau's Walden. It's not entirely clear (and maybe it does not matter) if this change from "nice" to crazy comes due to the concussion (Doppler falls off his bike prior to his re-valuation of his life) or if he is simply depressed and shaken by his father's death. Anyway, before you know it, his life as a misanthrope with a pet moose Bongo attracts more attention than he needs, and his way of life gets a following.

The novel is quirky and amusing in a lot of ways and there were parts of it I really liked (the man who spends his life re-creating the World War II scene, all the interactions with Bongo). Erlend Loe's humour is also the reason I keep reading his books.

It took nearly a decade for "Doppler" to be translated into English language, and I guess some of the sharpness and novelty of the novel was lost with age.

Overall, a light read, and the humour will not appeal to everybody. Approach with caution.
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Format: Hardcover
Came across this quite by chance in 'Waterstones' (yes, I know a real bookshop!) just before Christmas, and read it over the festive period. I had read something else by Erland Loe about 12 years ago called 'Naive.Super' the title of which sums up his style quite aptly. 'Doppler' could well become a future Christmas classic and one which I may return to year after year. It's a short, sharp shock of a novel which becomes more and more misanthropic as it goes on, but it is also very funny at the same time. 'Doppler' the protagonist, co-opting out of a materalist society, abandoning his pregnant wife and young son to go and live an austere life in the woods, with only a baby elk whose mother he has slaugtered on the opening pages for company is somewhat like 'Scrooge' on a reverse trajectory. However, scenes including a fight with his neighbour Dusseldorf involving giant bars of 'Toberlone' are guaranteed to have you laughing out loud, and there's some hilarious digs at the work of JRR Tolkien, the 'Teletubbies' and the construction of a bizarre totem pole. (infact there's a lot of things beginning with 'T' in this wonderful, eccentric, and occasionally disturbing piece of fiction, not least the ending which hints at a sequel. Or possibly not.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book defies description, but I’ll have a go. It’s about Doppler, a Norwegian guy who after the death of his father has an accident on his bike and subsequently turns his back on civilization to live in the forest. His sole companion is Bongo, an elk calf which he feels responsible for having shot Bongo’s mother for food. The conversations with Bongo made me smile. It’s a tale about family, grief, alienation and a gradual warming towards civilization again, or so you think. No matter how much Doppler wants to be alone, he seems to attract people around him.
It’s a charming tale with a cutting edge. Doppler is happy in the forest but is a keen observer of the society he has rejected. Forced to communicate again with his pregnant wife and two children, he struggles to cope with modern society and his responsibilities, Teletubbies add Bob the Builder included. His teenage daughter Nora, named after an Ibsen character of course, insists on talking to him in elfish. His son Gregus forgets the television and instead helps him carve a totem pole, intended as a memorial to Doppler’s father but which comes to represent the three male generations of Dopplers and Bongo.
I read it quickly and wished it was longer, a book that will yield more for re-reading I think.
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