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Don't Fall In Love With Everyone You See [VINYL] Import

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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£23.17 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched and sold by Amazon in certified Frustration-Free Packaging. Gift-wrap available.
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Amazon's Okkervil River Store


Product details

  • Vinyl (3 Aug. 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Jagjaguwar
  • ASIN: B0002QO38W
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 180,399 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

EVERYONE YOU SEE ,,NEU / VERSCHWEISST - EVERYONE YOU SEE - .Label: Jagjaguwar.Published: 2004/OKKERVIL RIVER

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Okkervil River walk a postmodern tightrope of ironic, yet sincere, folk music. They've been called alt-country (and half a dozen other silly subgenres, like avant-folk), and that's as good a name as any other, but doesn't really do them justice. Despite the sense of a slightly knowing smirk behind some of the tried-and-tested themes of the album (the general subject matter is heartbreak and abandonment), it's impossible not to be drawn in by Will Robinson Sheff's heartfelt singing. The music is largely flawless, and skips nicely between the livelier songs and the more melancholic ones. Though there is the odd moment where a track can drag a little, such as Bad Days, any problems are redeemed by the wonderful poetry of the lyrics.
So, in short, this album is not anything particularly new. However it is done in a new and deeply intelligent manner. Plus there's a duet with Daniel Johnston, what more could you want?
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars 21 reviews
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Just....so.....sad 4 Mar. 2005
By -> - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Those of us unfortunate enough to be stricken with an inability to see are also those of us fortunate enough to discover the often overlooked power of our auditory senses. Why do we notice sounds at night that go completely overlooked during the day, and get spooked by those normal sounds (walls and tables creaking, pipes rustling) that we couldn't notice less in the sunshine? Have you ever watched a scary movie with the sound off, or noticed your car stereo getting louder as the day grows dimmer? As sight, the most relied upon of all senses, goes, our ears seem to take up the cause to make us aware of our surroundings. More often than not, it is sound and not sight that arouses the most gripping emotional response in our brains.

That said, Okkervil River do a damn good job of conveying emotion, mostly depression and an unforeseen, conflicting, and tortured relationship with vocalist Will Sheff's mother that hints toward some type of unresolved, deeply rooted oedipal conflict. Where Bright Eye's Conor Oberst tends to obnoxiously mope and moan on the mike, Sheff seems to be on the verge of suicide, displaying a cool yet agonizing connection to his tales of adolescent murder and adult heartbreak. Mostly muted and collected, he occasionally breaks into an all-out shout that hints at Oberst-like emotion, yet manages to maintain a restraint that Oberst is incapable of showing.

Playing alt-country like the best Neil Young or Jackson Browne song, the twangy banjos, harmonica, and slide guitar fill in the cracks, acting as bridges between verses or interludes between lyrics, but never taking over. The real star here is Sheff, who stands out most on the classic "Westfall," a disturbingly collected tale about a high schooler, who, along with his best friend, murders a fellow student from a neighboring Christian school. "When I killed her/ it was so easy/ that I wanted to kill her again," he states in a tempered melody, which, when combined with his cool detachment from the narrative, is apt to send shivers into your skull. The crowds and cameras gather round, with all "looking for evil/thinking' they can trace it," however, Sheff reminds the crowd gathering that "evil don't look like anything."

With at least three songs directly referencing "mother," Sheff oddly centers this maternal figure at the center of many songs, displaying emotion from anger at her actions to a blatant want of attention-it is quite apparent that either Sheff can sell his songs like no other, or he's been through some pretty messed up times. This album stands to show that beauty comes from the strangest places.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Know Depression 25 Feb. 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This album loses none of the immediacy or intimacy of their previous CD, "Stars Too Small to Use," but expands on it with greater textural exploration, adding horns, violins, pedal steel, banjo and more to the bare acoustic arrangements of their earlier songs. Even more fleshed out instrumentally as these songs are, they are just as raw as those on OR's previous outing, something they accomplish through fantastic songcraft and bared-soul performances. Combining the rustic tones of Will Oldham (Palace, Bonnie Prince Billy) with the angst of Bright Eyes, this album should appeal to anybody who loves powerful songs performed with abandon. If you like this album, I also highly recommend checking out The Kamikaze Hearts, "Seven More Wonders of the World," if you can find it.
5.0 out of 5 stars Good advice. 18 July 2014
By Brittany Lynn Wolff - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Their best album for sure. Bought it for my brother, he loved it.
1 of 37 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars It doesn't get much worse than this 6 Dec. 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The best thing I can say about this CD is that it is kinda fun to try to figure out what they were trying to play. This "music" is worse than a bad high school marching band on a cold night, not because of the style or concept, but just a total lack of ability. The last time I paid to hear music this bad was Blind Melon opening for the Stones. Too bad zero stars is not an option.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Album Ever! 11 Mar. 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
2 songs on this album moved me to tears the first 4 or 5 times I heard them..."Kansas City" and the "listening to Otis Redding" one. They both have so much yearning embedded into the music, you can't help but respond, even if you don't quite understand or follow the storyline. "Red" is a song that I love more and more everytime I hear it. Many of my friends say it is their favorite song on the album. Daniel Johnston guest sings on the "happy hearts" song, and it is really a perfect addition. All the songs are strong, and I could go on and on. This album has been on the University of Minnesota radio station, 770, Radio K Top 40 album list as high as 6, as well as receiving frequent play on KVRX, the UT Austin station, if you don't want to just take my word for it. Listen intently and listen with much emotion!
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