£1.99
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 11 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Dombey and Son (Wordswort... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Dombey and Son (Wordsworth Classics) Paperback – 5 Jul 1995

4.4 out of 5 stars 61 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£1.99
£0.01 £0.01
Flexibound
"Please retry"
£0.99
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£1.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 11 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Dombey and Son (Wordsworth Classics)
  • +
  • Little Dorrit (Wordsworth Classics)
  • +
  • Our Mutual Friend (Wordsworth Classics)
Total price: £5.97
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 848 pages
  • Publisher: Wordsworth Editions; New edition edition (5 July 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1853262579
  • ISBN-13: 978-1853262579
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 4.3 x 19.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (61 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 19,353 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

There's no writing against such power as this...one has no chance. --William Makepeace Thackeray

Book Description

A proud businessman is at the heart of this satire - Dombey and Son is funny, highly relevant and hugely enjoyable. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Before I began reading Dickens in earnest (scarcely half a year ago I confess), I would have been hard pressed even to name 'Dombey and Son' as one of his novels. I am very content to be cured of my ignorance in that respect, because of all Dickens' novels that I have read so far (which is, as I'm reading them chronologically, The Pickwick Papers (Oxford World's Classics), Oliver Twist (Oxford World's Classics), Nicholas Nickleby (Oxford World's Classics), The Old Curiosity Shop (Oxford World's Classics), Barnaby Rudge (Oxford World's Classics) and Martin Chuzzlewit (Oxford World's Classics)), this is my personal favorite.

The reasons why are manifold. First of all, the theme of the book (a child neglected and unloved by his sole remaining parent) must surely strike a chord with anyone. We've all been children, and can recollect in hindsight that one of the most basic drives of any child is to be liked and feel loved by its parents. That such is not the case for Florence Dombey made me feel truly sorry for her and identify with her feelings all the more readily.
Read more ›
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I must disagree with comments made previously here about this being a dull book, for I found it enthralling and perfectly of its time. As has been said, the book is not so much about a man named Dombey and his son as it is about his daughter and her step-mother. The plot is quintessentially Dickensian. He is relentless in never letting relief come for more than a moment, and it is thrilling. His characters are never less than intriguing--from the small and waning Dombey clan to minor characters named wonderful things like Captain Cuttle, Miss Tox, Mr. Toots, and Mrs. Nipper. Within the tragic circumstances of a loveless but wealthy family, Dickens injects comical moments in which social climbers or other irritating company invade Dombey's inner sanctum. The emotional core consists not only of one's sympathy for Florence and Edith, but for the awful state of Paul Dombey, cold-man extraordinaire. It's just under 1,000 pages, and while I agree somewhat with the other reviewers in finding the first 100 or so not the most fluid of Dickens' prose, I was drawn in by practically every last page.
Comment 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Of the 14 novels Dickens completed in his lifetime, Dombey and Son is undoubtedly one of the least known; only Barnaby Rudge provides serious competition in this regard, it appears to me. It was popular with audiences of Dickens' own day, though. It was published in monthly instalments in 1846-1848, when Dickens popularity was very great, immediately following the success of the earlier Christmas books, including "A Christmas Carol".

Dombey and Son is more tightly plotted than its predecessors, for that reason it is often considered to mark the beginning of "late" Dickens, where thematic concerns became paramount. The Dombey of the title is a man of business, a very successful one, and the father of two children. One is a daughter, who is irrelevant to the business of Dombey and Son and thus irrelevant to Mr. Dombey, and the other is a son, Little Paul, who is expected to give material existence to the "Son" specified in the name of Mr. Dombey's business. However, Little Paul proves to be less of a chip off the old block than might have been hoped for, and baffles his father exceedingly when he asks him "What is money?" and follows his father's reply with "Yes, but what does it do?".

Further characters include the malevolent Mr. Carker, a consummate hypocrite who also displays some of the threatening sexuality of later Dickens characters like Bradley Headstone and John Jasper; Edith, a prototype for Lady Dedlock, and equally exaggerated; and Mr. Toots, who is madly, hopelessly and hilariously in love with Dombey's daughter Florence("'sof no consequence").
Ultimately, this book becomes more about Dombey's relationship with his daughter, whom he has continually neglected and spurned.
Read more ›
1 Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By M. Dowden HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 16 April 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Personally I have always been a fan of this book, and it is a personal favourite of mine. For some reason this novel is often neglected, probably making it the least read of all of Dickens' completed novels, but there doesn't seem to be a particular reason for this. It isn't as this is the worse book he ever wrote, far from it, but it may be because it is his most 'domestic', and perhaps in some ways not the sort of book you expect from Dickens.

Mr Dombey wishes for a son to continue the business Dombey and Son, as it has been run through the years. He already has a daughter, Florence, who is six when his wife finally gives him a boy. Mr Dombey has his wish at last and everything will continue as normal - or will it? What Mr Dombey wants, and what he gets are two different matters entirely. This is a book of its time, where marriages were arranged, women were meant to be seen and not heard, rather like the children, and Man ruled the world. In his usual way, Dickens questions these practices, making him possibly one of the more socially aware authors of his day, if not the most aware. Whilst tackling the serious matters of the day, he also gives us some absolutely wonderful characters, and some great comedy.

Perhaps more tightly plotted than some of his other works and not cloyingly sentimental (apart from arguably a certain death scene) this is a great book to read. Thackery himself despaired at the famous death scene, crying that he wished he could have written like that. There are slightly more than average typos in this text, but I can't really complain too much, as it doesn't cost, and it means that I don't have to carry around my treebook version with me. Remember, just because it isn't a novel that has been recently produced for tv (the BBC shelved plans for this a few years back), don't be put off, this is well worth reading.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback