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In A Doghouse
 
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In A Doghouse

14 Sept. 1998 | Format: MP3

£14.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:58
30
2
3:04
30
3
4:05
30
4
5:08
30
5
3:48
30
6
2:46
30
7
2:44
30
8
2:56
30
9
5:10
30
10
3:54
30
11
3:50
30
12
2:47
30
13
2:37
30
14
4:23
Disc 2
30
1
4:06
30
2
2:33
30
3
3:22
30
4
3:53
30
5
5:11
30
6
2:44
30
7
3:03
30
8
3:46
30
9
3:15
30
10
4:43
30
11
3:04
30
12
3:26
30
13
2:47
30
14
1:32
30
15
2:25
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Format: Audio CD
When the famous critic Lester Bangs reviewed Captain Beefheart's, 'Trout Mask Repica', for Rolling Stone, he claimed that the album, ' shattered my skull, made me nervous; it hit like a bomb'. I first heard Throwing Muses' debut album at the age of 14. It was winter, and being a teenager I was miserable for a lot of dubious reasons that seem pointless now. But the impact of the record when I heard it hit still like a bomb.
From the beginning of the album to the end, every song sounded vital. The music changed time signature so quickly, but magestically; songs became three songs in one, and still sounded so fresh and focused. I still haven't heard any album that can rival this, or come close to it for a reference.
The punk ethic is there. The music breaks down boundaries, but there is also a great deal of beauty that lies within the harmonies of Kristin Hersh and Tanya Donelly. The music makes me want to weep.
The lyrics are also very impressive; They are either extremely oddball, ('Why don't you do to my insight what you do to my insides', 'A kitchen is a place where you prepare, and clean up'), or they speak to every alienated adolescent in the world, ('I'm lonely at night, time on my hands, I feel sad in the day. Here I am, what a loser, waiting for years to go by').
But it was really the track, 'Hate my Way', that really got to me and changed the way that I thought about music for the rest of my life. Hersh's banshee like primal scream on this is unforgettable as she lets go and screams through the petty reasons why she hates the world and herself, ('A slug. I'm T.V. I can't find the ice'), then lists the problems other people experience, (A boy was tangled in his bike forever, a girl was missing two fingers).
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Format: Audio CD
Throwing Muses came to the attention of listeners in the UK when they were the first US band to be signed to the British label 4AD. I first heard of them from interviews in the NME and Melody Maker. The band sounded intriguing, and I snapped up the eponymous debut album (the centrepiece of this CD) as soon as I found it.

I listened to it again the other day for the first time in years. What got me the first time around was the strange intimacy and directness of the music. As a (male) teenager I also responded to the confusion and anxiety that were so powerfully expressed in the music. Tanya Donelly's songs were slightly more 'beautiful', Kristin Hersh's songs were more full-throated and anguished, but there was still an organic band at work - they sounded like they were both singing and playing about the same sorts of experience. The rhythm section (Leslie Langston on bass and David Narcizo on drums) were powerful and primal. The emotional range was huge. The songs careered crazily all over the place. Sometimes, like Donelly's 'Green', they were reflective and almost seductive. Hersh's songs, like the jittery 'America' and menacing 'Stand Up', were usually more aggressive (although the forlorn 'Call Me' might have been written by either of them) and some songs, like 'Hate My Way', were taut with a despair so real it was painful to listen to. The heart of the album for me is 'Vicky's Box', a tense study of self-loathing that begins in the third person and ends in the first. It starts unassumingly, with loping bass and guitar lines a bit like early Talking Heads, but as Hersh circles warily around the story of a man scared to ride in cars because of the way they remind him of his own homosexuality, it slowly becomes more and more obsessive.
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Format: Audio CD
The best Throwing Muses record ever. Its tense instability (and an intimidating Kristin Hersh giving the impression she'll explode any second in fury) and saddening naivety make this an unforgettable listen.

Highlight: Hate My Way
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