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Doctor Who: Remembrance of the Daleks: 50th Anniversary Edition by [Aaronovitch, Ben]
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Doctor Who: Remembrance of the Daleks: 50th Anniversary Edition Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

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Length: 226 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product description

Book Description

The Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Collection: Eleven classic adventures. Eleven brilliant writers. One incredible Doctor.

About the Author

Ben Aaronovitch writes tie-in novels and TV scripts, and wrote the screenplays for the Seventh Doctor episodes Battlefield and Remembrance of the Daleks. He is the author of a series of audio dramas based on TV's Blake's 7, as well as the acclaimed Rivers of London series. He also works as a bookseller.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1120 KB
  • Print Length: 226 pages
  • Publisher: BBC Digital; 01 edition (7 Mar. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00BBA6FJ8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #141,830 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Just Finished this 50th anniversary story it was brilliant fast page turner read ironically I nearly did not purchase it because i was familiar with the story from TV but Glad I did .

For me Doctor Who is the classical series i did think Remembrance of the Daleks was a little bit childish compared to other Dalek stories,the author however is able to in very subtle ways give credibility to the story .Plan to watch the DVD again soon.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It seems an odd situation to select a novelisation of one of the television serials to represent the Seventh Doctor whilst choosing original novels to represent all the other Doctors; especially as the Seventh Doctor has probably featured in more original novels. This book is also the only former Target book to appear in this anniversary selection.

The above aside, `Remembrance of the Daleks' has probably always been considered the best of the Seventh Doctor's television adventures, and deservedly so. Much of what made the TV version great is lost, however. It was certainly one of the more visual Doctor Who serials. Although the author has added to the battle scenes little can be done to compensate for actually seeing Dalek's battling it out in civil war.

Opposed to this, the novelisation has allowed the author to build upon his characters and make them more fully rounded. There was very little time to devote to individuals and their motivations during the action of the televised version. There is a love affair sub plot between Gilmore and Rachel that was unapparent in the program (or at least it was to me) and much more is made of the attraction between Mike and Ace. Mike's character is given far more reasoning for his actions as well. Most interesting though is that AAronovitch has made individuals out of some of the Daleks. The Saucer Commander, the Dalek Supreme and the Special Weapons Dalek are all treated as individual characters. There is even a bit of previously undisclosed information concerning Davros' past. One of the most interesting aspects of this book is the way that the author has followed the Dalek Supreme and Davros in a parallel. Usually every insight into the motivations of Davros is followed by a small section doing the same for the Dalek Supreme.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Hard to believe this is almost a quarter of a century old.
I picked this one up partly because it was one of my favourite Doctor Who periods and partly because of the books this author has gone onto write, specifically the Rivers series, beginning with: Rivers of London (PC Peter Grant).
The foreword was well worth reading, and pretty much gives the books strengths and weaknesses in a nutshell.
If I was reading it without the nostalgia and history of Doctor Who I might have rated it slightly lower, but I enjoyed it, and it was a good entertaining read. Thanks for the memories and a couple of hours of nostalgia fuelled fun.
If you like this Doctor and Ace then definitely recommended.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An odd choice for this anniversary series of reprinted novels featuring the various Doctors. The seventh is possibly the subject of more original novel length fiction than any of the others, so to find him the only Doctor represented in this run by a novelisation of a transmitted episode is rather baffling. The novelisation itself introduces a few elements not seen on screen, several of which entered the mythology of the character for a while, and this does make it an item of more interest than a straight translation of a screenplay, but these elements are all things which are better represented and expanded on in those (far, far superior) original novels (some of which the author wrote). In its own right, this is a quick dash through a fairly satisfying TV story that you can buy the DVD of, and are probably already familiar with if you're the type to be picking these books up in the first place. It does its job reasonably well as a novelisation, but doesn't come close to earning a slot in this run of reprints.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the story chosen to represent the Seventh Doctor in the novelisations to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Doctor Who in 2013. Unusually for this series of novels, this story was actually a televised serial from the original series, played initially in 1988 as part of the 25th Season, and featuring Sylvester McCoy as the Doctor and Sophie Aldred as Ace, his feisty companion. This was only the second story to feature Ace, her character having been introduced in the last story to feature Mel Bush, Dragonfire.

In this story, the action takes place over just a few days, but the pace is rapid. The Doctor has returned to Totters Lane in November 1963, to resolve some unfinished business from when he left with Susan, Ian and Barbara. Unfortunately, he seems to have miscalculated somewhat and gets more than he bargained for when two groups of Daleks join in the action.

The story as it appeared on tv always seemed a bit confusing to me, with the scenes cutting ina and out so fast that it all became a bit of a blur. The book tidies that up quite a lot, with some background that helps build the characters better, and continuity that helps tie the storyline together into a coherent narrative. It is still a fast-paced story, and there are lots of action scenes, with Ace and her baseball bat getting involved early on. I really liked the character of Ace; she made a change from `girly' or `helpless' companions, and her rapport with the Doctor meant good exposition of the storylines they were in together. The Doctor is his usual seventh Doctor mysterious self, and the characters from the 1960s time period are well written and portrayed.
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