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Doctor Who: The Eyeless Hardcover – 26 Dec 2008

4.1 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Random House UK (26 Dec. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1846075629
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846075629
  • Product Dimensions: 18.6 x 11.7 x 2.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 475,060 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"well-paced and exciting... a good reading of a great novel" (www.doctorwhoreviews.co.uk) --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Book Description

In this compelling novel from the bestselling Doctor Who range, the Doctor battles a mysterious weapon on a barren, war-torn planet - and this time he's all on his own.

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By Keen Reader TOP 50 REVIEWER on 13 Aug. 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Hmm .. .disappointing overall I think. Don't get me wrong, there were elements that I enjoyed in this story. The Doctor is on his own, so no companions to distract from the `Doctor'iness of the story (if I can put it like that). But overall, I was left feeling that something wasn't altogether right.

The book starts abruptly - there is never, unless I blinked and missed it, any exposition as to how the Doctor knew about this planet and the potentially destructive Fortress and still active weapon. There is never any justification for his having turned up there, nor any reason for him to think, as he obviously does, that nobody else will be there.

I really really could not like Alsa, who plays such a part in the story - I'd prefer to think the Doctor would not have been so accommodating to her psycopathic nature and nasty temperament. As a character, I found her intensely annoying; and the fact that she faces no consequences for her behaviour and betrayals really bugged me.

The other characters, we never really got to hear their stories - what made Jennver the way she was? And Jeffip? And Dela? And who really was Gyll? Maybe some more time spent on theirr backstories would have helped me to be more empathetic towards them. As it was, they largely felt just like plot devices - there, but expendable.

And The Eyeless? Really? All the words in the universe to think of to call some aliens, and The Eyeless? That's the best Mr Parkin could think of?

All in all, a bit of a mishmash - good bits, and bad bits. The Doctor, as played by David Tennant, is well portrayed here - cheeky, irreverent, serious and slightly angry and sad all in one trainer-shod Timelord. But overall, left me thinking it could have been much better than it ultimately turned out to be.
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Format: Hardcover
The Eyeless feels like a hybrid of Cat's Cradle: Time's Crucible, Vanderdeken's Children and Beltempest whilst being miles better than all three of them. It takes the breathless scale and beautifully imaginative landscapes from Marc Platt's near impenetrable opus, the exploration of a deadly trap from Christopher Bulis' puzzle book and the astonishing death toll and the taste of defeat from Jim Mortimore's massacre in print. I am surprised that it was published as a part of this series because it lacks the humour we have come to expect, has long stretches of prose without dialogue and pushes the Doctor to his limits both physically and psychologically. If you have been disappointed by the lack of depth in the NSAs then this is the book for you, there is some stunning development of the Doctor's character that is tied directly into the root of the series. This is the book that affords a brief glimpse at the Time War and allows the Doctor a shockingly racist moment. A book that brings home the pain of loss and the scars that won't heal on the one man who lives on.

No allowances are made for a child audience. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that a child could not read this but it has not been lobotomised like so many of the earlier NSAs. Take the setting, which is beautifully realised in the first six pages and detailed on a huge scale so you can easily visualise this alien metropolis. Parkin then spends the first third of the book taking the audience on a trip through this ruined paradise, painting a shocking picture of poverty and plenty sitting side by side. Take the guest characters who reveal new shades every time we meet them. Some of whom are bumped off unpredictably to further the plot. Or even the pace of the book which enjoys several breathers to flesh out this world some more.
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Format: Hardcover
The Tardis dematerialises in Arcopolis, a city that has experienced an apocalyptic event at the hands of a devastating superweapon hidden within a structure known only as the Fortress. This lies in the centre of the lifeless city in a kind of standby mode awaiting further destructive instructions. Determined that such a weapon should not fall into the wrong hands or be used again, the Doctor intends to infiltrate it and render it inoperable. However, the survivors of Arcopolis have other plans for the Doctor. Meanwhile the Eyeless are coming and they have every intention of gaining a weapon with such potential.

This is one of those rare occasions where the Doctor is not just travelling time and space with no objective. In this story he has a specific mission – to destroy the Fortress before anyone else can ever use it. This means that for most of the time the Tenth Doctor is in a more serious mood than usual. The author successfully captures this side of Tennant’s performance.

In the Doctor’s personal timeline this book is set during the onscreen period of David Tennant’s final year. Thus the Doctor is currently travelling without a companion after Donna’s fate. Unlike most of the books published during this period the Doctor is not given an ‘honorary’ companion figure for the duration of the story. The Doctor spend a good proportion of this story alone and when not so he is with a changing assortment of people that even includes collaborating with one of the Eyeless for a brief time. In some ways this works well as it allows the author to slip in some personal introspection for the Doctor. Some of this involves having no one else to explain things to but the circumstance of Arcopolis and the Fortress are cause to remind him of the Time War.
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