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Django 1966

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4.1 out of 5 stars (59) IMDb 7.3/10
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1960s seminal spaghetti western originally banned in Britain starring Franco Nero as the outlaw who drags a coffin with him wherever he goes. Django (Nero), an ex-Yankee soldier, arrives in a US-Mexico border ghost town with speed-of-light gun skills, a romantic heart and an enigmatic morality. He gets involved in the feud between two opposing bandit gangs, one led by Major Jackson (Eduardo Fajardo), the other by Hugo Rodriguez (José Bódalo). Holding Jackson responsible for the death of his wife, Django seeks revenge by teaming up with Rodriguez in a plan to steal the major's gold. But when Rodriguez becomes unwilling to cooperate the situation gets out of hand leaving Django to rely on his sharpshooting to make it out alive.

Starring:
Franco Nero
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 28 minutes
Starring Franco Nero
Director Sergio Corbucci
Genres Western
Studio ARGENT FILMS LTD
Rental release 27 September 2004
Main languages English
Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 28 minutes
Starring Franco Nero
Director Sergio Corbucci
Genres Western
Studio ODEON ENTERTAINMENT
Rental release 21 January 2013
Main languages English

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray
DJANGO [1966]

Film: I have finally watched this classic for the first time before getting into Tarantino's epic and I confess that liked Django a lot. It is a quite rough film and it features some very exciting scenes (like the "coffin escape") from a cinematic point of view.

Technical Data: Total Size = 21,8GB, Feature Film = 15,9GB (including and English and an Italian DTS-MA-2.0 Mono Track), English subtitles are available for both versions, Running Time = 91:37min (uncut version)

Picture Quality (reviewed on a JVC X30 projector):

- THE GOOD = The picture is very sharp 95% of the running time and the colours appear rich and natural so that the film looks like new at various points. Blacks are solid and compression works fine. We also get the original aspect ratio of 1,66:1. There is a slight layer of grain that looks absolutely satisfying and natural to me preserving a rough and authentic look (never getting disturbing or distracting). Argent Films really seem to have struck this from the original negative.

- THE BAD = While I was watching I was pretty sure that they must have put the film on a 50GB disc. So, the small file size is not reflected in comression artifacts. Nevertheless I think labels should always go for maximum quality when remastering classic titles and advertising their Remastered Version! I also have to mention here that the opening credits come with some scratches and other dirt. Those sequences are not as sharp as the rest. But I can live with that.

- THE UGLY = About 40% of this Django transfer show some strange flickering (anomalies in bright and dark areas). This actually IS distracting sometimes and made me sad when it occured for the first time because the transfer otherwise really matched my expectations.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
If you were to ask the average member of the movie going public what they associate with the name 'Django' undoubtedly they would go straight for Quentin Tarantino's new hyperbolic western homage Django Unchained and quite rightly so as its the latest big budget all star cast from the infamous director of all things hip and cool. But if you were to go back a good 46 years a little known director Sergio Corbucci was to cast a little known actor Franco Nero in a fairly unassuming low budget Spaghetti Western which unknown to them was to become one of the most influential Italian westerns of its time spawning countless sequels and copycats as well as furthering the careers of its director and star. This movie like Tarantino's new epic was also called Django but was something entirely different to Quentin's new flashy blood splattered opus. A contemporary of the now infamous Dollars trillogy from Sergio Leone Django was a surprisingly different approach to the cut and dry western formula of old and like Leone's 1964 genre kick starter A Fist Full Of Dollars was a reimaging of Kurosawa's Samurai classic Yojimbo. Rough, dirty and uncompromising, Django featured for its time excessive violence, a huge body count and a decidedly downbeat tone. Also unlike Leone's movie or indeed most westerns before it featured an uncharacteristically unlikeable main character who arrives in town unaided by a horse, wearing torn dirty attire and encompassing the atmosphere with a thick air of machismo and bravado, dispatching enemies in an emotionless, selfish and unforgiving way.
Corbucci's approach is also a complete change to the vast majority of westerns of the time. Shot in the far more narrow European aspect ratio of 1.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is a fantastic cult spegetti western this for me is a thousand times better than the newest version starring Jamie fox.
This is not going to be for everybody but I certainly liked it this is a very violent western that being the reason why it was band from the UK for so long before it was finally released.
Many films have tryed to copy this film over the years but for me this will remain the best so far.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
The recent theatrical release of Quentin Tarantino's "Django Unchained",
gave me the impulse to buy the original "Django" film.
I watched this on a 46" inch LCD screen, and I do not share the negative
experience reported by other reviewers.
I think that the image was sharp, but not sparkling.
But this may have to do with the chosen color palette of the film.
Similarities with Tarantino's film start with the name of the anti-hero,
and end with the haunting theme song.
This Django is not a redeemer. He is a grim, mirthless cynical man.
There's a comic book quality in much of the film:
In its drab, yellowish grey world little color stands out:
The blazing blue eyes of Django, the red scarves and hoods of the
white supremacists, the peacock colors of the whores, and the red of blood.
Luis Bacalov's music is effective, but it doesn't drive the plot-
in the way Ennio Morricone's music does for Sergio Leone's spaghetti westerns.
Please note that there are no English SDH in the interview with Franco Nero
and the Alex Cox presentation of the film.
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