Buy Used
£17.96
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Nearfine
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Gently used. Expect delivery in 2-3 weeks.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Diving Stations: The Story of Captain George Hunt and the Ultor Hardcover – Illustrated, 21 Oct 2010

3.8 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Illustrated, 21 Oct 2010
£17.96

Man Booker International Prize 2017
A Horse Walks Into a Bar has won the Man Booker International Prize 2017. Learn more
click to open popover

Special offers and product promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Pen & Sword Maritime; 1st edition (21 Oct. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1848843216
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848843219
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 16.1 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 609,906 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

About the Author

Peter Dornan is a freelance writer on military and medical matters. For his work as a Sports physiotherapist with many international teams (the Wallabies and Australian Cricket Team) he was awarded the Commemorative 2000 Australian Sports Medal. In 2002 he was appointed as a Member of the General Division of the Order of Australia (AM).

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This is Peter Dornan's 4th book and his best by far. "Diving Stations" is a seriously good read. The book is not overloaded with technical details which is a tendency in naval books about WW2 these days. It tells of the journey of a boy to the Captain of the British Submarine Ultor. The book is easy to read and very hard to put down as so much is happening. This book had me in when I read the prologue. I immediately wanted to skip the chapters (I did) to find out what happened next.

The author also gives a good lateral view of what is happening in WW2 around the operations of the Ultor which makes the story more fascinating.

George Hunt was a great leader of men - he must have been to be as successful as he was. To find out how successful you must read the book.

You will not be disappointed if you purchase this book.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I had the great privilege to correspond with George Hunt DSO* DSC* during his last few years. He was a modest man when it came to recounting his achievements during the war, and his wartime patrol reports, in the National Archives, are splendidly understated and resolutely factual. At the same time, he was also very proud to have served in the Royal Navy and to have had his portrait painted for the Imperial War Museum at the end of the war. I had expected this book to build on the factual detail of the reports in order to provide a real sense of the man himself; that this aspect was lacking, may well be down to the likelihood that George was self-conscious about having his biography written, at least in his lifetime, and more interested in factual accuracy than laying bare his personality for public inspection.
That said, it is important to have this biography of one of the Royal Navy's two most successful submarine commanders (if you work on numbers of ships sunk, David Wanklyn VC, DSO** comes out on top; George, however, sank the greater tonnage, so the honours are even). Through some gripping reconstructions, not least of the ramming match with the Italian destroyer Saggitario, the author brings home the difficulties and dangers of life on a Royal Navy submarine, especially in the fraught years of the Mediterranean conflict when it seemed that every man's hand was against the flotillas and many boats were lost with all hands. He also puts the conflict into its wider context. Much attention has been paid to the exploits of the German U-boat commanders, so 'Diving Stations' goes some way towards redressing balance. Indeed, it is worth reading this book alongside that autobiographical classic of the submarine war 'Unbroken' by Alastair Mars.
Two gripes: too much reliance on sentences with 'George' as the subject. And - which is not the author's fault - NO INDEX...
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It was tremendous to read about one of the Royal Navy's submarine commanders in the second world war.This tells the story in a laid back style which allows one to make an assessment of the contribution that Captain Hunt made. His courage and his success in the confined waters of the Mediterranean make this a very worthy biography of a RN hero!
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
It is ironic that for a biography of a submarine commander this book is so lacking in depth; it's more like a hydrofoil skimming lightly over the surface.

There is no doubt that the life and career of its subject is a story well worth telling but this wretched tome fails miserably in that. It is notable that the author is described as a "Writer" rather than a "Historian."

It isn't helped by being so short, 180 pages of large print. Lack of an index seems like a tacit admission that nobody is going to want to look any particular thing up in it.

There are far better books about submarine warfare available, covering both sides, and anybody would be far better spending their money and time on acquiring and reading those.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
George Hunt has clearly had a great life and his wartime exploits are remarkable. I really enjoyed reading about him and yet something held me back from awarding this bookfive stars. The book is well written and very factual but in a way is almost too matter-of-fact in describing great acts of skill and bravery, with the result that they seem a bit understated. The account passes through events too quickly.
But don't let that touch of criticism put you off the book. It is still a great read and a great tribute to George Hunt's amazing career as a submarine commander in wartime.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
So why only three stars? although this book was read with interest, I felt that the author let captain Hunt down due to what I felt was a lack of in-depth detail, much more could have been done by the author to bring this story of heroism to life. It came across as an abridged version of events. whilst I wouldn't discredit this publication excessively, I was a little disappointed in the way this story was presented...but why not judge for yourself!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse