FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
The Diviners has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Diviners Paperback – 18 Jan 2007

2.1 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£2.72
Paperback
"Please retry"
£8.99
£0.01 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£8.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (18 Jan. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571229476
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571229475
  • Product Dimensions: 12.6 x 3.5 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,093,083 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"'Sweeping, dramatic, intelligent and utterly absorbing... a true epic.' The Times"

Book Description

The Diviners by Rick Moody is a spectacularly epic comedy of love, politics, sex and work from one of the most admired and influential American writers of his generation.

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

2.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book achieved the rare feat of forcing me to abandon it long before the end. In its defence I might accept that it could be a book that may polarise opinion, but if it's a case of love it or hate it I'm firmly in the hate camp.

I persevered for some 2 or 300 hundred pages in the hope that the jarring dichotomy between the subject -the well trodden path of the superficiality of the modern world as reflected through the media- and the quasi-mythical writing style may come together through some genius of synergy, but it simply didn't. It just got increasingly pretentious, and increasingly annoying. The final straw was probably the 3 page analysis of parabolic arcs to describe someone falling off a bicycle.

Worst of all was that to me Moody's points of reference and intention seemed every bit as blatant as his inability to match them.

As an exploration of the Manhattan media elite his characters seemed wholly unconvincing compared to those of Jay Macinerney, his important exploration of modern America feeble compared to Jonathan Franzen, and his surrealist deviations in to modern mythology simply dull and unimaginative compared to Jonathan Safren Foer.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book has got its merits, which surely raise it above the one starred reviews its garnering here on Amazon. Its occasionally funny, often raw scenes(the elderly woman drinking and being sick, locked in her toilet and her past is particularly real I thought), and it certainly captures a New York that is immune to weird. Nothing is shocking to its cast of characters, everything is already written or, better still, turned into an epic miniseries.

I think the authors attempts to be so uncaringly postmodern, so devoid of any empathy for any of the characters or the situations they find themselves in, make this a difficult read. Characters you don't love to hate. You just hate. So whilst brave its just not easy to like this book, but it is easy, for me at least, to admire it.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I didn't realise just how awful this book was until I was already 250 pages in and STILL no plot had developed, by which point I felt that I had to at least finish it so I could write a fair review of it. On the positive side there are some moments of beautiful writing, the last sentence is wonderful. However those few paragraphs are spread throughout 570 pages of complete drivel. The characters are flat the plot strands are filament thin and dull and to add insult to injury none of them are actually given the respect of being finished. For the most part the prose is wittering drivel that drones on and on inducing nothing but sleep and daydreams. Don't touch this book with a barge pole.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Nearly seventy years ago, another Brunonian, Nathanael West, wrote "Day of the Locust", a classic satire about Hollywood culture. Now Rick Moody has wrought a bold, ambitious novel about Hollywood which deserves favorable comparison to West's novel. But "The Diviners" is a bold, ambitious novel which may not find favor with those who prefer linear fictional narratives, but rather, with those, like myself, who prize elegant, stylistic prose, even if it tends to be frequently overwrought; more in the style of a Neal Stephenson than a William Gibson (Though here Rick shares Gibson's recent interest in telling tales that are rather short on plot and are much more fascinating as stylish, well-written character vignettes.), for example. It's because I truly treasure Rick's lyrical prose that I regard him highly on my list of favorite authors (He ranks third after William Gibson and Jonathan Lethem; I will also confess that he was a classmate of mine in a writing seminar taught by a visiting professor, novelist Angela Carter.), and here in "The Diviners", he doesn't disappoint at all.

Set around the time of the 2000 American presidential election, "The Diviners" is ostensibly the tale of Vanessa Meandro, the ruthless, dictatorial head of the independent film production company "Means of Production", who believes that she has found the next hot property; a sprawling television miniseries about dowsers, "The Diviners", which is a veritable history of Mankind and his insatiable search for water. But the delightful Ms. Meandro, addicted to Krispy Kreme donuts, doesn't know that neither a treatment nor a script exists for this NEXT BIG THING emanating from Hollywood.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category


Feedback