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The Divide Hardcover – 17 Oct 2005

4.3 out of 5 stars 56 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Press; First Edition, 1st Printing edition (17 Oct. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0593045262
  • ISBN-13: 978-0593045268
  • Package Dimensions: 23.6 x 15.8 x 4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 167,053 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

A journey of discovery and redemption (BELFAST TELEGRAPH)

The story of normal people thrust into an abnormal situation by perverse circumstance. THE DIVIDE is a book that genuinely merits the term 'page-turner (From its thrilling opening to its bittersweet conclusion')

DAILY MAIL ('A convincing and moving novel interlaced with wonderful descriptions of the Montana countryside')

SUNDAY TIMES ('THE DIVIDE is genuinely affecting') --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

'A convincing and moving novel interlaced with wonderful descriptions of the Montana countryside.' (The Daily Mail)

'The Divide is genuinely affecting.' (The Sunday Times) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I haven't read the horse whisperer but will do .The Divide was a book group choice. The story is about a family, peppered with their jobs. The break up of there marriage may have been a factor in their daughter Abbie choosing an ' alternative life' . She then accidentally becomes a murderer and is wanted and on the run. The Divide is an area where the story starts when a father and son are skiing, they have a fall and find a body frozen in the snow and ice. I had to stay up late to finish it as I wanted to know how it ended.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
wonderfull book, Ive read all of his books .
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Format: Paperback
The opening chapters of The Divide had me thinking that this was going to be a crime story. Two skiers discover the body of a young woman encased in ice, and alert the police. The girl turns out to be Abbie Cooper, wanted by police all over America for murder and acts of terrorism.

I quickly realised that there was much more to The Divide. Most of the story is told in flashback, relating the history of the events that led up to Abbie's death. Strong focus is placed upon her parents, Ben and Sarah, whose relationship has now broken down. Ben has a new partner and has become estranged from most of his family, despite his obvious love for his children.

Nicholas Evans is a fine writer. His characters are well-developed and real. His descriptions of scenery and landscapes are rich and vivid in detail, with lovely use of language. And above all, he is a good storyteller. Although we know what is going to happen to Abbie, we find ourselves feeling sympathy for her as she is drawn into situations she never intended to be in, led astray by an older man. One realises just how easily this can happen to any young person with passionate feelings for a cause.

It could be said that some of the loose ends are tied up rather too neatly. On the other hand, this does give the story a sense of completeness which could be lacking if we did not know what would happen to the main characters. Overall, The Divide is a thoroughly enjoyable story and is to be recommended.
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Format: Paperback
When I read The Horse Whisperer it was before the hype had really got traction and, therefore, long before Robert Redford gave it an appalling Hollywood ending. Notwithstanding Monty Roberts' very public dismissal of the portrayal of the horse whisperer in Nicholas Evans' story, I thought that book was outstanding: driven by the passion of a writer who fundamentally believed in his story, lifted by the unique subject matter and given a sprinkling of stardust through sparkling characterisation and a stunning backdrop you could almost see.

If nothing else, The Divide shows that Evans is still one of a select few who, like Steinbeck or Hemingway, can write scenery. What is missing is the characterisation. I had difficulty, too, with the story - though that's conceivably more subjective.

So, in crude summary, the book follows the lives and loves, joy and betrayal and hope and anguish of the Cooper family - four people whose ordinary, suburban lives are shredded when their 'golden child' daughter Abbie takes up environmental arms against corporate America and, with her activist boyfriend, goes on a spree of eco-terrorism that ends in a life on the run from the FBI.

Here's where I struggled:

The book starts with a father and son on a skiing trip and discovering Abbie's body. So we know, within the first 20 pages, that Abbie is dead. What we don't know is the who or the why. And you imagine, not unreasonably, that the book is going to be about finding out who killed her and why. That it isn't is not really a problem.
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By A Customer on 11 Feb. 2006
Format: Hardcover
Another masterpiece from Evans and so beautifully written. His use of language and description transports the reader into the book itself. Absolutely gripping. Most definitely worth reading and cetainly on par with his previous novels, The Horse whisperer, The Loop and The Smoke Jumper. If you havent read one of Evans books, then get reading. My best friend introduced me to 'The Loop'and have never been disappointed.
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Format: Paperback
The opening chapters of The Divide had me thinking that this was going to be a crime story. Two skiers discover the body of a young woman encased in ice, and alert the police. The girl turns out to be Abbie Cooper, wanted by police all over America for murder and acts of terrorism.

I quickly realised that there was much more to The Divide. Most of the story is told in flashback, relating the history of the events that led up to Abbie's death. Strong focus is placed upon her parents, Ben and Sarah, whose relationship has now broken down. Ben has a new partner and has become estranged from most of his family, despite his obvious love for his children.

Nicholas Evans is a fine writer. His characters are well-developed and real. His descriptions of scenery and landscapes are rich and vivid in detail, with lovely use of language. And above all, he is a good storyteller. Although we know what is going to happen to Abbie, we find ourselves feeling sympathy for her as she is drawn into situations she never intended to be in, led astray by an older man. One realises just how easily this can happen to any young person with passionate feelings for a cause.

It could be said that some of the loose ends are tied up rather too neatly. On the other hand, this does give the story a sense of completeness which could be lacking if we did not know what would happen to the main characters. Overall, The Divide is a thoroughly enjoyable story and is to be recommended.
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