Buy Used
£1.01
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from the UK. Former Library books. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Your purchase also supports literacy charities.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Distrust That Particular Flavor Hardcover – 3 Jan 2012

3.9 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£38.98 £1.01
CD-ROM
"Please retry"
£60.00
--This text refers to the MP3 CD edition.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Putnam Adult; 1 edition (3 Jan. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 039915843X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399158438
  • Product Dimensions: 21.1 x 14.7 x 3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 676,219 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Gibson pulls off a dazzling trick. Instead of predicting the future, he finds the future all around him, mashed up with the past, and reveals our own domain to us."--"The New York Times Book Review "
"I forget that in addition to being a major novelist ("Zero History, ""Neuromancer," etc.), he's one of the best essayists and critical observers currently operating within our sociocultural sphere. This is his first essay collection, and it's messed up how good it is: raw, weird, honest, smart."--Lev Grossman, "Time Entertainment "
"Exquisitely written, done to a turn with both insight and that unmistakable prose that is just shy of spectacular....This is a fine and even essential complement to the Gibson canon, and a delight to read."--BoingBoing.net
"Though he's often lauded as a big-picture man, these pieces make one thing clear: He's even better with the little details."--"A.V. Club"
"The most startling pieces here crackle with his excitement at discovering some unexpected aspect of the new."--"The Globe and Mail" (Canada)
"A breezy, engaging read."--"The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel "
"Potent...elegant prose."--"The Seattle Times"

Gibson pulls off a dazzling trick. Instead of predicting the future, he finds the future all around him, mashed up with the past, and reveals our own domain to us. "The New York Times Book Review "
I forget that in addition to being a major novelist ("Zero History, " "Neuromancer," etc.), he s one of the best essayists and critical observers currently operating within our sociocultural sphere. This is his first essay collection, and it s messed up how good it is: raw, weird, honest, smart. Lev Grossman, "Time Entertainment "
Exquisitely written, done to a turn with both insight and that unmistakable prose that is just shy of spectacular. This is a fine and even essential complement to the Gibson canon, and a delight to read. BoingBoing.net
Though he s often lauded as a big-picture man, these pieces make one thing clear: He s even better with the little details. "A.V. Club"
The most startling pieces here crackle with his excitement at discovering some unexpected aspect of the new. "The Globe and Mail" (Canada)
A breezy, engaging read. "The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel "
Potent elegant prose. "The Seattle Times"" --This text refers to the MP3 CD edition.

About the Author

William Gibson's first novel Neuromancer has sold more than six million copies worldwide. In an earlier story he had invented the term 'cyberspace'; a concept he developed in the novel, creating an iconography for the Information Age long before the invention of the Internet. The book won three major literary prizes. He has since written nine further novels, most recently Zero History.

William Gibson was born in South Carolina but has lived for many years in Vancouver.

--This text refers to the MP3 CD edition.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A. Miles TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 22 Feb. 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The blank pages separating each article in this book are coloured blue, and as most of the articles herein are only a page or two long, about half of the book seems to consist of blank blue pages. Add to this the enormous font, double spacing and acres of white space, and one surmises that the publishers have managed to pad out a couple of dozen short pieces into a 17 quid hardback.

Additionally, most of the stuff here dates back to the early days of the internet, when Gibson was the go-to guy for cyberspace. Hence a lot of it now seems quaintly old fashioned and a bit pointless to read 20 years on. - One article, for instance, is about how Gibson doubts Ebay being able to work practically. Really, most of this is stuff most authors would have stuck up on websites for free at this point in their career.

I started reading the book at 7 yesterday evening, had finished it well before 9PM, and felt royally ripped off. Not recommended.
Comment 39 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Jeremy Walton TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 5 Jan. 2015
Format: Paperback
Gibson's fiction - for example, the classic Neuromancer - provides a clever, challenging and imaginative view of the world's future which is usually, but not always, dystopic. Here, he collects together several short pieces of non-fiction (together with a contemporary post-script for each one), some of which provide a partial background to how his novels come to be written. Others contain his thoughts and observations about Japan (a location he returns to many times over the course of this collection, since, "[i]f you believe, as I do, that all cultural change is essentially technology-driven, you pay attention to Japan" [p157]), Singapore (memorably described here as "Disneyland with the Death Penalty"), Steely Dan, film and the internet.

I found his pieces about this final topic to be the most interesting, since a number date from very close to (or perhaps just before) the explosion of that technology into general use. Presumably, he's included them here to indicate a degree of justification for his standard appellation of "visionary"; on this evidence, it's pretty good - for example, back in 1989, he predicted the erosion of the distinction between family media appliances (TV, CD player, computer,...), and in 2000, he views our interactions with the net as communications with a global computer.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By tallmanbaby TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 19 Jun. 2016
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a collection of the shorter writings of William Gibson, with recent short reflections added by the author on each piece.

Gibson has a sure instinct and interest on the impact of technology on society, and the pieces offer brief glimpses into the life of a digital seer, hanging out drinking in Tokyo with Douglas Coupland, pursuing random items on eBay. He seems to have a critical subeditor hard wired into him, criticising his own articles for being too long, or just not good enough. This is not bloggy ramblings but sharp commercial standard articles.

The collection is short, so I rationed it by reading a couple of other books at the same time. That encourages you to savour the pieces all the more. I have marked down slightly because it does feel a bit short for the money, but this is good stuff.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
William Gibson has said more than once that science fiction possesses a unique toolkit for dealing with our science fictional present. He said that again when I asked why mainstream writers are turning increasingly to science fiction during a question and answer session held during his New York City literary event for this very book. He could have offered similar advice to journalists with respect to their narrative nonfiction and journalistic reporting; "Distrust That Particular Flavor" makes a most powerful case for that, in vivid, often concise, prose that will remind his most ardent fans of his early "Sprawl" stories and others collected in "Burning Chrome" and the novels "Neuromancer" and "Count Zero", and one that also evokes "Idoru", and other, later novels like "Zero History", in its relentless attention to detail. Any new book written by William Gibson should give readers ample cause for celebration, but this, his first foray into nonfiction, is not only a most distinguished collection of essays, but one that will be admired for years.

There is undoubtedly a strong cyberpunk-like beat in much of Gibson's narrative nonfiction. His poignant remembrance of his favorite SoHo (New York, NY) antiques store written within days of the 9/11 terrorist attacks ("Mr. Buk's Window") could have easily been part of one of his early "Sprawl" stories (Not surprisingly, he admits in a concise afterword that that antiques store would inspire him to finish writing the novel he had just started; "Pattern Recognition".).
Read more ›
Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback