Buy Used
£1.90
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Tree Savers
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: A used book that is in good, clean condition. Your item will be picked, packed and posted FREE to you within the UK by Amazon, also eligible for super saver delivery.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Dirt Music (Picador 40th Anniversary Edition) (Picador 40th Anniversary Editn) Paperback – 2 Feb 2012

4.2 out of 5 stars 67 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 2 Feb 2012
£0.01 £0.01
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Picador (2 Feb. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1447202864
  • ISBN-13: 978-1447202868
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 3.2 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (67 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 35,912 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

Arguably one of the finest of all Australian novelists, Tim Winton shows that he remains on top mid-season form with Dirt Music, a wistful, charged, ardent novel of female loss and amatory redemption. The setting is Winton’s favourite: the thorn-bushed, sheep-farmed, sun-punished boondocks of Western Australia. The cast is limited but spirited: the two chief protagonists are a fortysomething adoptive mother with a vodka problem called Georgie Jutland, and a brooding, feral, bushwhacking poacher, Luther Fox.

The plot is something else altogether: an elegantly wearied, cleverly finessed mutual odyssey, that opts to follow the sometimes intertwining, sometimes diverging lives of poor Georgie and Luther, as they try to deal with the odd alliance they comprise, as well as the complex and fractured lives they want to leave behind. The way Georgie deals with her unwitting inheritance of two dissatisfied adopted kids is particularly touching, poignant, and well written.

Best of all, though, is the prose. Somehow it manages to be simultaneously juicy and dry, like a desert cactus. This is especially true when Winton touches on the scented harshness of the Down Under outback: "the music is jagged and pushy and he for one just doesn’t want to bloody hear it, but the outbursts of strings and piano are as austere and unconsoling as the pindan plain out there with its spindly acacia and red soil". This is a wise and accomplished novel. --Sean Thomas --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Dirt Music plunges the reader straight into small-town life in Western Australia, where we find ourselves at once adrift and percussed by the tidal movements of love. Winton's prose has a shocking veracity, and a velocity that is intoxicating to behold. --Gretel Erlich author of The Solace of Open Spaces

See all Product Description

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Tim Winton's books are not light and easy. His characters are the walking wounded, scarred marred and often barely surviving. He besets them with harsh tragedies, violent accidents, abandonment. Sometimes their situations are so dire that you might want to put the book aside and go into the fresh air just to know that life isn't as bleak and cruel as he paints it. When you return to the narrative, wary and battle weary the chinks of light begin to appear.
Dirt Music reduced me to tears - Fox the sole survivor of a brutal family accident, an outcast of a harsh unforgiving Australian community finds love and redemption of a sort through Georgie, a woman who is as adrift as he. The novel is surprisingly suspenseful, so I won't write any more of the actual events, but God is it good! Tim Winton stands with Janette Turner Hospital as a major talent who has sprung from the arid ground of Australia.
Comment 32 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is a stunning novel in many unexpected ways, and for a newspaper such as the Mail on Sunday to say that it is "a book about the possibility and power of love" hardly even skims the surface of its beauty and its complexity.

With precious little knowledge of Australian literature, I confess to having approached it warily, and mainly on the recommendation of a trustworthy friend, although also on the strength of its having been shortlisted for the Booker Prize [in 2002]. Also - and this seems to happen more and more often these days - the blurb on the back of the paperback edition is slightly misleading: it introduces us to the two main characters, Georgie Jutland, "stranded with a fisherman she doesn't love", and Luther Fox. "Outcast". And "so begins an unlikely alliance".

But this is not particularly accurate, given that, for much of the novel, after an initial idyllic but thwarted episode, Georgie and Luther find themselves many hundreds of miles apart. And Tim Winton's novel slowly but inexorably turns into a fascinating thriller, as disturbing elements from the past slowly emerge, concerning the tragic history of Fox's family, and the role played in that tragedy by Jim Buckridge, Georgie's doltish, swaggering and somewhat sadistic partner.

From the fishing community of White Point in Western Australia, the reader travels northwards with Fox into an increasingly hostile and wild landscape against which he has to pit his wits constantly in order to survive. It is a journey into an Australian heart of darkness, and Fox, despite the music in his soul, is sometime hard pressed to continue making sense of what he sees as "a life writ in mud".
Read more ›
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Read this book in advance of the R4 book club recording with the author. It's driven by an incredibly strong sense of place - one of the most extreme I've read - and the three main characters who push the plot along between them.It's worth reading for the descriptions of the WA coastline alone plus the Ozzy terminology of billies and swag etc - very colourful.
The three characters are all very damaged by lack of love, loss and alcohol - but what is the novel about? Some say it's Georgie's love for Lu but I think it's just as much about redemption - Jim Buckridge is not a good man but tries to do the right thing even if it is against his nature. You do wonder at the nastiness behind the idyllic setting of White Point - natural beauty does not seem to have rubbed off on its inhabitants. In the end the most sympathetic characters are the minor ones encountered along the journey - Menzies and Axel in the bush and Horrie and Bess in their decrepit van.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I am not an avid reader, nor prone to writing reviews, but this book is something special.
What makes it for me is the time and effort taken to embed the characters and the plot into the western Australian environment. In essence it is a very simple story, but the magic is in the telling; a stark story told with an eloquent richness.
I found it a real pleasure to find characters explicitly shaped by, and articulated through, the intensity of the landscape around them. It reminds me of Steinbeck in part, and conjures up expansive visual images.
I stayed up till the early hours to finish this book, and - if I have a criticism - it would be that ending comes together a little too conveniently. A minor grumble though, the journey the book takes you on is quite exceptional.
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
The beauty in this novel lies in the character definition and wonderful, at times dense prose which IS reason enough to read a book (despite some reviewers insistence on an unnecessarily complicated plot). I think the purpose of the book was to convey the personal odyssey of the central characters and link this to the landscape and lifestyle of Western Australia - a feat which Winton attains succesfully. Not a classic book in the mould of Wintons unsurpassable 'Cloudstreet' but a more than worthy read
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Oh what to say about Dirt Music, a book that both amazed and irritated? In the end I have come down on the positive side and hence the 4 star rating, but let's get the gripes out of the way first. Language and grammar are meant to combine as the art of communication, so why try and turn the reading of a book into a puzzle? Is it some sort of macho thing that persuades authors to abandon norms? The absence of quotation marks in a book which contained a not inconsiderable amount of dialogue, did NOT enhance the reading of the book. Was this meant to give the appearance of modernity? All I know is that I was often re-reading passages just to check who had been saying what to whom, which was frustrating bearing in mind the emotional intensity the exchanges were conveying. Note to the editor, it is not clever to put obstacles in the way of the reader, the book was wonderful in so many other ways why detract from that enjoyment?

The second gripe was also a part of the book's strength. The language was just beautiful. The descriptions of the landscape of Western Australia were superb and the prose poetic and lyrical. The tastes, smells and colours of the country were a huge part of the book and perhaps its greatest strength; John Steinbeck would have been proud of the sense of place imparted by Tim Winton's writing. The increasing emotional turmoil of Lu Fox as he headed away from White Point into the wilds and the physical privations he put himself through were as painful as raw nerve endings. My complaint though, is that this section went on far too long and became meandering, such that the narrative lost momentum significantly and was only regained in the last 30 or 40 pages or so. And then it was finished off too quickly.

Frustrations apart, I really enjoyed my first taste of Tim Winton and I have Cloudstreet lined for my next.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category


Feedback