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Different Class / Deluxe Edition
 
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Different Class / Deluxe Edition

11 Sept. 2006 | Format: MP3

£9.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:46
30
2
3:11
30
3
5:50
30
4
5:55
30
5
4:33
30
6
3:29
30
7
3:18
30
8
3:47
30
9
6:01
30
10
4:06
30
11
4:16
30
12
3:43
Disc 2
30
1
7:37
30
2
4:30
30
3
3:15
30
4
4:06
30
5
3:34
30
6
6:40
30
7
3:49
30
8
3:09
30
9
4:47
30
10
4:21
30
11
6:18
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan. 2006
  • Release Date: 11 Sept. 2006
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)
  • Copyright: (C) 2006 Universal-Island Records Ltd.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:44:01
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001KENHX2
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,729 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Whilst Pulps previous album, the wonderful "His N Hers", concentrated on life in and around Jarvis's home town of Sheffield, taking in sleazy assignations, sordid sex and parochial ennui and frustration, the follow up "Different Class" turned their forensic eye on London. The surface glamour/ subterranean desperation, class snobbery, and the tragi-comic swirl of its hedonistic lifestyle are all sprinkled liberally in amongst the albums cast of characters.

Primary of which, and represented by no less than three different versions (the single, vocoder and Glastonbury versions which is a bit of overkill) is the protagonist at the heart of Pulps most famous song, the middle class tourist slumming it with the proles in "Common People". Sagaciously eloquent but brimming with what renowned left wing columnist Paul Foot called the pick me for all socialists indignation "Common People" is that ultra rare thing- a tremendous pop song that taps into a moment in history to perfectly encapsulate the times and provide biting social commentary. (See also "Ghost Town "by The Specials") Remarkably it's not the only song on "Different Class" to do this. "Sorted For E, s And Whizz" is as articulate and ardent dissemination on drugs culture as will ever be committed to a simple pop song. That sweaty moon faced tosser Pete Doherty may be some sort of anti -hero for many of today's youth but this song adroitly summarizes why the biggest (though by no means only) loser in a life like his is him. "Disco 2000" has become a little over familiar but is still a cracking tune pinioned around that flippantly superb riff while fellow single "Mis-Shapes" is another terrifically arranged Pulp moment on one of Jarvis favourite themes, social exclusion.
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Format: Audio CD
Ok, so you know you have this record somewhere..? But, where is it? Maybe you left it in a friend's car? Or your sister stole it and never gave it back? Maybe you lost it in your last move? Or maybe it's all scratched up from too much wear and tear?

Well what a perfect opportunity to re-acquaint yourself with the glory of Pulp! Not only do you get the finest record of the 90's, you get a bonus disc that actually manages to be even better. What are you laughing about? I'm serious! "Common People" might be a great song, but its no "Catcliffe Shakedown," Jarvis' masterful, comic commentary of life on the edges of modern civilization. And sure, Disco 2000 is a great club track, but it has nothing on PTA. There is so much goodness buried away on the bonus disc you won't even know what to do with yourself.

There would be a better CD this year, and there won't be a better CD next year either. Hell, this is it. If you are in a band, you might as well retire, because you'll never make a better record. Nobody ever will.

Don't believe me? Try. Go ahead. Let's see you find a better record?
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Format: Audio CD
Are there really people who do not know this album? Every track could have been a single. It's brilliant. I had it when it first came out - with 12 different covers. When I first heard "Mis-shapes" I thought, "the revolution has arrived". My Jarvis Cocker impressions were famed at school.
I always thought it a shame that the B-sides were hidden away. There's a certain weirdness in a 14 year old getting excited at "PTA", which is about a teacher wanting an affair with a student.
For me this album defines an era, and I can't put my feelings into words. I think it is fresh-sounding, well-crafted, strong and vibrant, and Pulp's most commercial sounding album.
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