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A Dictionary of Scottish Phrase and Fable by [Crofton, Ian]
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A Dictionary of Scottish Phrase and Fable Kindle Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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Length: 512 pages

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Product Description

Review

'It is nigh impossible to reach the item you first set out to read without being sidetracked by other beguiling morsels' --Herald

'This is the best compendium of Scottish life, lore, language and literature' --The Times

'This is such a linguistic and etymological treasure trove that once picked up it is virtually impossible to put down' --Scottish Field

About the Author

Ian Crofton was born in Edinburgh and worked for Collins in Glasgow before moving to London, where he has been a freelance writer and editor for 25 years. Previous books include Brewer's Dictionary of Curious Titles; Brewer's Britain and Ireland (with John Ayto); Brewer's Cabinet of Curiosities and A Dictionary of Art Quotations.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1661 KB
  • Print Length: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Birlinn (5 Nov. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00C8X72DU
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #820,371 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Scottish life and letters are full of reference works aimed at home readers ranging from the definitive (Mairi Robinson's Concise Scottish Dictionary) to the outrageous and scurrilous (no names, no pack drill). This absolute gem actually touches both extremes, though the entries are normally distributed along that spectrum, from the inevitable, such as the Ploughman Poet and the Appin Murder, to the amazingly obscure such as His Polynomous Omnipotence or Kertin Mary. We particularly love the Kilmarnock mittens, though as residents of nearby Strathaven we have to say he hasn't got his Strathaven Toffee quite right. Since its arrival the book has been dipped into on many evenings, to be followed by a breaking of silence, "I never realised that…", or, "Did you know…". The volume lives on the lounge coffee table has never reached the bookshelf alongside its learned reference companions. It probably never will. Every dip is a delight. It should be in every literate Scottish home, in Scotland or elsewhere.
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Format: Hardcover
I picked this up as a present for my partner who has recently moved to Scotland, and I have to say I happened to have a light browse whilst wrapping it up that I could not put it down. Had to get a copy myself and it takes pride of place on my kitchen table.
AN excellent read and would be a great gift present
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Format: Hardcover
I loved this book. The cross references on every page lead the reader on an endless treasure hunt of stories, characters and vivid, often earthy Scottish phrases, each with its own dead-pan translation. My personal favourite is "if it's no' the skitter, it's the spew", roughly equivalent to life's a bitch, but there are many to choose from. And if you want a list of colourful vernacular terms for Scottish flowers and fauna, or nicknames for football clubs, regiments, places or eminent/ notorious Scots, past and present, this book is for you. Ian Crofton has a keen sense of faux jockery (jings, hoots mon!), akin to Balmorality and Wallacethebrucism, but relishes ever inventive Scottish slang, sayings and invective. But it's the stories that really draw you in: Johnnie Faa, ("King of the Gypsies"), Sawney Bean (pater familias of the legendary cannibal family), the Flannan Isles mystery, and endless others. If you have a half memory of a tale that you heard long ago and need to fill in all the riveting details, again this book is for you. Finally, if you've forgotten your history and need to refresh your take on, for example, the Darien Scheme or the Covenanters, you will find a suitably succinct synopsis here. But anything quirky, arresting or unusual is grist to the author's mill. Keep it to hand but I warn you: it's hard to stop browsing.
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