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A Dictionary of Law (Oxford Paperback Reference) Paperback – 24 Jul 2003

4.4 out of 5 stars 77 customer reviews

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Paperback, 24 Jul 2003
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Product details

  • Paperback: 560 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford; 6th Revised edition edition (24 July 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0198607563
  • ISBN-13: 978-0198607564
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 2.8 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (77 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 167,489 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

"The entries are clearly drafted and succinctly written.... Precision for the professional is combined with a layman's enlightenment."--Times Literary Supplement"If legal language is a fog, this is a valuable flashlight."--TES --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Elizabeth A. Martin and Jonathan Law are editors at Market House Books in the UK. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I recently started work as a Legal Secretary for a firm of solicitors and wanted a book which gives the correct spellings and meanings of legal terms - this does the job perfectly. I refer to it a lot and my boss, a Partner in the firm, is so impressed with it that even he refers to it from time to time! It is well deserving of five stars.
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By A Customer on 24 Mar. 2002
Format: Paperback
It's a really good law dictionary that covered every important and basic terms and events in there. It's comprehensive and concise. It would be a really helpful reference or tool book or undergraduate or a-level law students.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have studied all aspects of Tort, Family, Business, Criminal, Property, Land, Contract Law and Civil and Criminal Litigation at Level 3 and every word I have wanted to look up has been in this dictionary. It has been my life line throughout my studies. A must have for all law students at every level.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I only had a handy-down 1999 version of the ODL and needed a more up to date version once i started to cite it in essays, and this does the trick!
Seller was spot on with the second hand description; definitely recommend!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Many law courses and universities in the UK are advising students to pick up a law dictionary to use alongside their studies. One dictionary that some tutors deem useful is the Oxford Dictionary of Law, and so far this dictonary has provided a useful insight into the meaning of certain legal phrases - including latin phrases and words that are used throughout legal documents.
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Format: Paperback
Bought this for my studies being a first year undergraduate Law student.
Extremely useful when lecturers sometimes forget to elaborate on word meanings and latin phrases.
It's got a Writing and Citation guide which is a added bonus.
Worth well getting to clarify meanings and terms.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you are a law student, like I am, you cannot study law without this book, would highly recommend it.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is OK, but ultimately the definitions are not very good, and actually are wrong in some marked instances. If you put the definitions into the internet, you'll always be better, so even with it being cheap, it's basically worthless.

More disappointingly, the definitions don't go on to prescribe usage of the words, or usage in a legal context. There are lots of words which are legally related, but are more procedural, but these pad it out a lot, but aren't worth noting down. It would be like having a sports dictionary which mentioned a thousand makes of football. The best example was "person". It completely avoids the legal definition, and so, also avoids the whole aspects of you having a person, etc..

This is one of those things which you could buy, go to use once, become thoroughly annoyed as you probably could have written a better definition yourself, then never see any need to look at again, apart from to annoy yourself.
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