Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £5.49

Save £4.50 (45%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

A Diary of The Lady: My First Year As Editor by [Johnson, Rachel]
Kindle App Ad

A Diary of The Lady: My First Year As Editor Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 63 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£5.49

Length: 484 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled
  • Due to its large file size, this book may take longer to download

Kindle Daily Deal
Kindle Daily Deals: Books from 99p
Sign-up to the Kindle Daily Deal email newsletter to discover daily deals from 99p.
Get a £1 credit for movies or TV
Enjoy £1.00 credit to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle Book from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle Books) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 credit per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 on Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Terms and conditions apply


Product Description

Review

HYSTERICAL. For the first time, everyone is talking about The Lady for reasons other than nannies (Piers Morgan )

Hilarious (Daily Mail )

A total romp, wonderfully readable, unflinchingly described (Zoe Williams Guardian )

Eye-poppingly comic (Mark Lawson Guardian )

Giddy, lively, Mitfordesque, hilarious (Observer )

Action-packed, entertaining, marvellously indiscreet. Johnson is everything you want in a diarist and has a compulsive habit of saying the wrong thing (Sunday Times )

Boisterous and captivating (Roger Lewis Sunday Express Books of the Year )

Made me laugh out loud and stay up so late reading it that I shot terribly on the first drive (Financial Times )

Surprisingly brilliant (Aa Gill )

About the Author

Rachel Johnson is married to Ivo Dawnay, has three children, and lives in London and Somerset. Her previous books include The Mummy Diaries and the international bestseller Notting Hell, both of which are published by Penguin.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 11788 KB
  • Print Length: 484 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (30 Sept. 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00457X7NQ
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 63 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #172,296 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Fizzing and buzzing with day to day detail - The Diary of The Lady - will mostly interest those who have taken out a subscription or buy this jolly weekly; to which I signed up straight after the tv programme. Now we know 'How to be an Editor', as even with no previous experience, RJ takes on the task with gusto and panache. Apparently self confident but secretly squirming at her own faux pas; and how human is that.

The fun of this book is the naughtiness, the cheek, the indiscretion, some machiavellian plotting; the whole hearted enjoyment of the freebies and the low down on this individual office's habits. Eye opening for any country mouse to get the inside story of London society. Names are carelessly dropped and rather sweet stories bring some media names charmingly to life. Bumbling through the year ever in fear of being 'whacked' (sacked) the Captain of the Ladyship sails on through stormy seas and calm.

As to the mag itself -when The Lady arrives at our house my husband reads it before me. 'The Lady Likes' is my favourite page, I always want everything on it ditto the recommended beauty products. A great deal of hard work must go in to getting all the pages filled weekly. I now understand the thinking behind the products and services advertising alongside the content, and feel grateful that the companies that do use it are supporting the editorial. As always gazing at the life changing job opportunities offers a way out of the everyday. It really is very good value.

Good for Rachel, and long may you last.
1 Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This brilliant diary is witty, funny and eye-poppingly indiscreet. Rachel Johnson describes her first year as the editor of The Lady, a faded magazine in genteel decline. Crackling with energy, this book charts the head-on collision between Rachel (modern, metropolitan and smart as a whip) with its diehard readers who froth with indignation at any hint of change and the bemused owners, the Budworth family (who clearly didn't quite realise what they'd let themselves in for).
This book is also a page-turner. Will Rachel be able to turn the old girl round in time? She's clearly worked her socks off,and she's done a damn good job with the magazine. As a regular reader I can report that the new-look Lady is vastly improved: intelligent, warm, funny and packed with good writers - Alexander Chancellor, Mary Killen, Antonia Fraser, Quentin Letts, and lots of articles by Rachel Johnson herself.
1 Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I declare an interest. I am a Lady columnist. At least ,as I write, I am. Like all of us who had complacently assumed we could go on making reasonable amounts of money from journalism ad infinitum, we have had to accept that no journalist's job is now safe, . We walk a weekly tightrope as a younger generation of readers opt for skimming rather than `poring over' as they used to do in Enid Blyton's Famous Five. No job is secure any more. The Lady was a goldmine for its owners for almost a hundred years as everyone who wanted to employ a maid or a cook or butler and everyone who wanted a job in service, bought it. But then Gumtree came along. The readers went from 90,000 twenty years ago to 27,000 when Rachel took the helm. Rachel Johnson's diary of her first year as editor of an endangered title gives a rare insight intothe world of weekly publishing. She cleverly kept a diary of her Lady life which gives immediacy and the ring of truth to her account of her struggle to rescue the title. Because she is recklessly indiscreet, Rachel's contribution to the gaiety of nations, is extremely readable - the plain, unvarnished truth always is. I always knew she had a sense of humour. I had no idea she would emerge as one of the great comic writers of the 21st century. The circulation of the Lady is now up to 35,000, still not quite enough to save us but, not since Toby Young's "How to Lose Friends and Alienate People"h ave we had such access to behind the scenes of a glossy. A stylish, immensely enjoyable, disgracefully indiscreet read of a year inthe life of the magazine, the building not redecorated since 1952, and the staff which, until Rachel came along, were trapped in a time warp.by Mary Killen
1 Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Wickedly funny, name-dropping, dirt-dishing expose of life in the offices of the sedate ladies' journal. There is truly never a dull moment! The story is filled with wonderful characters and fascinating insights into the production of the magazine. If you knew little about The Lady, this will bring you up to speed, and if you thought you knew, be prepared for surprises!
1 Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I was intrigued to read this after watching the Channel 4 documentary, and having worked as a reporter on a newspaper for a massive parent company I was also interested in how a family-owned company that puts out a single publication functioned in the 21st century.

I am not sure if I was satisfied on either of those two counts. Whilst I enjoyed reading it and sympathised with the task laid at Johnson's feet, I couldn't help but think there was a more serious side to this story that deserves to be told more explicitly; as it stands you have to squint between the constant name-dropping, details of what outfit Ms Johnson wore to an event, and repetition (yes, we know about the cellar, there's no need to keep going on about it) to try and glean the true dilemma of that is happening at The Lady.

Regarding the repetition, this must surely be a symptom of the fact that the book was rushed through; the diary ends in June and the book came out in September, which is a fast turnaround. This is probably also the reason for the howler near the end of the book "take The Lady up the isle" (not some appalling euphemism it should be pointed out) as well as "the ladies smoking room" on the dust jacket, when it should be "The Lady's smoking room".

What makes you want to read on is the cast of characters out of which Johnson does manage to get good mileage, though how she (or they) are still working there after this is anyone's guess, but I would have loved to have heard more of the crazy uncle upstairs (possibly a book in itself?!).

I reached the last page of this book thinking that this was a bit of a missed opportunity, although I did go out and buy a copy of The Lady (and I'm only 36!) which is part of the point I suppose. (Not bad, by the way.
Read more ›
1 Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover