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Diaries: In Power 1983-1992 Paperback – 3 Jul 2003

4.1 out of 5 stars 33 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Phoenix; 1st Phoenix Edition edition (3 July 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1857991427
  • ISBN-13: 978-1857991420
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 2.7 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 264,705 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Book Description

The first volume of Alan Clark's bestselling DIARIES, covering the downfall of Margaret Thatcher.

About the Author

Alan Clark, MP for Plymouth between 1974 and 1992 and Kensington and Chelsea between 1997 and 1999, was Minister of Trade and Minister of State. He was married with two sons and lived at Saltwood Castle, Kent. He died in 1999.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was a little disappointed as I probably expected something more pithy and controversial given Alan Clark's reputation for plain speaking. However, it was fascinating to see his insecurities and frustration with the system showing through. There were a few too many "in-house" coded references which needed referring back to the explanations at the beginning of the book. This is not so easy to do on the Kindle version. All that said if you are interested in historical politics, especially via the medium of a diary, you will probably enjoy this book.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A1
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Format: Paperback
One thing is for sure, these are real diaries. If you want to see under the bonnet of politics and government, then a read of Alan Clark's diurnal scribblings will repay your time. Despite his High Toryism and mildly aristocratic social bearing, Clark is an appealing, avuncular personality, and he evinces these attributes with his thoughts, impressions and recollections of the daily struggle at the heart of public life.

At times, Clark does seem a little crawling and obsequious in his private attitudes to those whose favour he must curry in order to climb the political ladder, but when he does move into a more critical mode, he is trenchant and unsparing in his assessment of the sundry character flaws found among his colleagues. In a way, the Potemkin Village of modern British politics must have been quite limiting for a man of Clark's talent and independence of mind; indeed, there is a palpable sense of frustration running through these diaries at how ultimately pointless and futile the practice of mainstream politics can be for its foot soldiers.

Clark was clearly a highly-competent defence minister - a post he coveted - and I found his thoughts and musings on defence issues very interesting, but I have to say the highlight of this volume is a certain little incident in the House of Commons in July 1983, when Clark was allegedly 'tired and emotional' while answering parliamentary questions as a government minister. It's sad to elevate a seemingly trivial indiscretion to a level of prominence, especially when it concerns such a talented man, but it would be silly to deny its importance to these diaries.
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Format: Paperback
This book is required reading for those interested in the Thatcher government at its zenith and also for the events leading to Thatcher's downfall. Clark writes like a dream and includes much gossipy detail. Clark does not come out well from this, which adds to the credence that can be given to the diaries. So this very readable and entertaining.

However, it is a view from the right of the Tory party and Heseltine' s viewpoint (for instance) is not even recognised.There is nothing on Lawson's resignation or any serious reflection that the Thatcher government was running out of steam in 1990. There is some mindless recording of gossip which reminds one of what a shower this lot were. For a balanced view one should also read Lawson's,Howe's and Heseltine's memoirs. Nonetheless, as with Crossman's diaries the diarists tend to make the historical weather for a time at least.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Suggested by a friend, not my cup of tea at all
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Format: Hardcover
I did read this about 6 years ago & I think it was this edition ending the year (1993) I first came to live in Scotland! (I worked with someone who was a relation of Norman Fowler's & he came across as a nice chap). Very interesting & good writer - see elsewhere on my Profile page for Barbarossa.
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Format: Paperback
A brilliant warts-and-all expose of the United Kingdom's runaway political party of the 1980's. Deeply honest, often brilliant, occasionally slipping into self-pitying apathy, Alan Clark documents a uniquely personal (and, many would say, uncomfortably realistic) view of the steamroller that was Thatcherism. Balanced by an enviable personal account of his time as one of the upper classes, this book delivers pleasure by the bucket-load on many levels. Overall, an immensley enjoyable and insightful read - even if, like myself, you do not share his views, background, politics, etc. The world is a poorer place without Alan Clark.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Boring
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