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The Devil Wears Prada

3.6 out of 5 stars 208 customer reviews

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--This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 688 pages
  • Publisher: Chivers Large print (Chivers, Windsor, Paragon & C; Large type edition edition (31 Dec. 2003)
  • ISBN-10: 0754019926
  • ISBN-13: 978-0754019923
  • Product Dimensions: 21.8 x 14.6 x 3.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (208 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,765,882 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

It's a killer title: The Devil Wears Prada. And it's killer material: author Lauren Weisberger did a stint as assistant to Anna Wintour, the all-powerful editor of Vogue magazine. Now she's written a book, and this is its theme: narrator Andrea Sachs goes to work for Miranda Priestly, the all-powerful editor of Runway magazine. It turns out Miranda is quite the bossyboots. That's pretty much the extent of the novel, but it's plenty. Miranda's behaviour is so insanely over-the-top that it's a gas to see what she'll do next, and to try to guess which incidents were culled from the real-life antics of the woman who's been called Anna "Nuclear" Wintour. For instance, when Miranda goes to Paris for the collections, Andrea receives a call back at the New York office (where, incidentally, she's not allowed to leave her desk to eat or go to the bathroom, lest her boss should call). Miranda bellows over the line: "I am standing in the pouring rain on the rue de Rivoli and my driver has vanished. Vanished! Find him immediately!"

This kind of thing is delicious fun to read about, though not as well written as its obvious antecedent, The Nanny Diaries. And therein lies the essential problem of the book. Andrea's goal in life is to work for The New Yorker--she's only sticking it out with Miranda for a job recommendation. But author Weisberger is such an inept, ungrammatical writer, you're positively rooting for her fictional alter ego not to get anywhere near The New Yorker. Still, Weisberger has certainly one-upped Me Times Three author Alix Witchel, whose magazine-world novel never gave us the inside dope that was the book's whole raison d'être. For the most part, The Devil Wears Prada focuses on the outrageous Miranda Priestly, and she's an irresistible spectacle. --Claire Dederer, Amazon.com --This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

Review

PRAISE FOR THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA:

‘This little gem mixes Sex and the City charm with dry New York wit.’ REAL

‘Sassy, insightful and sooo Sex and The City, you'll be rushing to the bookshop for your copy like it's a half price Prada sale.’ COMPANY

‘The most fun we've had in ages.’ HEAT

‘Delicious…a great insight into the world of magazines and fashion.’ RED

--This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
I was really surprised to read all the so-so reviews about this book. I picked it up in an English Bookshop in Spain, needing something light-hearted after Captain Corelli's Mandolin, and while I wouldn't dare compare the two books (the latter is a work of genius) I found The Devil Wears Prada a great book to lounge on the beach with.

It tells the story of Andrea Sachs, a college graduate who lands a job as personal assisstant to Miranda Priestly, editor-in-chief of fashion bible Runway. Andrea has no interest at all in fashion, and takes the job as a stepping stone to serious journalism. However, Miranda soon proves to be the boss-from-hell. Taking on this job drains Andrea's soul as she loses contact with the outside world, casting aside her family, friends and boyfriend in order to meet Miranda's outrageous demands.

While I would hesitate to call the novel funny, it is a larger-than-life look at how people sell their souls to the workplace and their bosses. It is difficult to comprehend the tasks that Andrea is asked to complete, and if indeed the author's stint working for Anna Wintour was anything like this, I feel sorry for her! It is not a masterpiece of prose fiction; however it is an easy read and perfect escapism from what we all think to be a tough old life. I can see why it has been made into a film - think Bidget Jones with a touch more sarcasm trying to totter around in 6inch Jimmy Choos with a tray of Starbucks coffee in one hand and a takeout lunch in the other, and that is Andrea Sachs. I have awarded it 4 stars because it was a light hearted, easy read, perfect for a holiday.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book isn't the best book I've ever read by far, but I really don't understand all the 1 and 2 star ratings when it's a really entertaining read! It's not exceptionally moving or groundbreaking, but it's a gripping book that you'll enjoy from start to finish as you learn more about the characters. Somebody said Andrea was one dimensional - the book's plot doesn't allow for her to develop properly, that's true - but it doesn't stop her being a fun and likeable main character. I'd definitely recommend it especially for a holiday read. The film didn't live up to the book at all!
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By A Customer on 27 Oct. 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I bought this book with high hopes as the title caught my eye and the fact that the author was once an assistant to Anna Wintour, Editor-in-Chief at American Vogue. I expected a sassy, witty book and what I actually got was quite disappointing.
The book isn't groundbreaking. It doesn't reveal anything about the fashion world that we didn't already know. She constantly talks about the "anorexic models" as if we were oblivious to the fact that most models are underweight. And none of the characters are endearing; the main character, Andrea Sachs, is generally quite boring. Their personalities don't develop during the time you are reading.
The book is a fun, rainy-day read, but don't expect much from it. You always knew what was going to happen next, especially with the Miranda Priestly, who provides the title for the book.
For someone who has worked in the fashion industry, there is no excuse for referring to Alberta Ferreti as "Alberto Ferreti".
Read if you're bored, but don't expect anything new. The plot is non-existent and the book in general just left me feeling unfulfilled.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I work for a UK/US fashion magazine and can tell you i laughed the whole way thru this book. I loved it.

Fashion magazines exploit their young staff ruthlessly. In fact my only criticism is that it wasn't BAD enough, i though Miranda Priestly got off too lightly. I have sat with many fashion editors and magazine editors who think the earth gravitates around their desks. I have sat thru the sycophancy and idiocy of London Fashion Week and you really couldn't make it up. I have worn loaned clothes from the 'fashion cupboard' on girls night out and put them back with red wine spilled down the front. I have picked up that dry cleaning and coffee so many times. I know that Lauren wrote from experience and am glad that she saw it for what it was - a time to gather enough ridiculous anecdotes together to write her funny novel, sell the film rights and then get a proper life. It's brilliant. And accurate.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Actually, I much preferred the film. Two hours or so in front of the TV, and it's finished. The book isn't one of my unputdownables, and was left for days before resuming. I did also jump a few pages at a time when it became a teense repetitive. An interesting storyline though about the vagaries of the fashion world, and how bitchy it can be, especially in New York. Wanted to knock Andy's, her boyfriend's and Lily's heads together, as each really didn't understand the other two's working lives. If Andy really detested Miranda that much, and dreaded going into work each day, she should have left. No job is worth that kind of abuse, just so that designer clothes can be worn for free. A holiday read only for me.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
The devil may indeed wear Prada, but the literary equivalent of houte couture this novel is not! To put it bluntly 'The Devil' is more Primark than Prada. Weisberger's book contains neither style, nor substance and upon finishing it one experiences the anticlimax of a story that never really goes anywhere. Reading this is akin to the experience of shopping in a souless high street clothes store: cheap and uninspiring and offers nothing but mass produced tat. The endless name dropping list of designers, models, actors, actresses, labels and very well known coffee shop chains only serves to hit home the damning effects of 21st century celebrity obsessed, capitalist and globalised culture. And the protagonist's claim that a very famous Brazilian supermodel is actually quite short in real life was laugh out loud unbelievable! Take my advice, ditch the book, avoid the movie and watch Ugly Betty instead.
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