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Detonator Orgun [VHS]

3.4 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Matthew Bray, Jessica Calvello, Cory Carthew, Brendan Charleson, Robert Chase
  • Directors: Masami Ôbari
  • Writers: Hideki Kakinuma
  • Producers: Hideki Kakinuma, Jin Maeda, Noboru Ishida, Satoshi Koizumi, Takanori Yaegaki
  • Language: Japanese
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Manga
  • VHS Release Date: 1 Oct. 1999
  • Run Time: 150 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00004CUNZ
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 341,642 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

The planet Earth of 2292 is at peace, until it comes under threat from a race of machine warriors. Virtual reality game player Tomoru Shindo is chosen to pilot the Detonator Orgun, a renegade cybernetic soldier being rebuilt in EDF headquarters. Tomoru must learn to handle the Detonator before the first machines attack, little knowing that it holds the key to their enemies' weakness in its memory cells.

From Amazon.co.uk

Originally released in 1991, the three-part Denotator Orgun plays like a mixture of several popular sci-fi films. Tomoru, a teenage boy in the 24th century, is haunted by weird dreams partially based on the computer games he plays with his friends. He soon discovers he's telepathically linked to the mysterious alien robot, Orgun. Meanwhile, at the Earth Defense Force Intelligence He adquarters, Dr Michi Kanzaki and supercomputer I-Zak decrypt a message from deep space that turns out to be the blueprints for Orgun's physical makeup. As they make these discoveries, an advanced race of aliens nears the Earth with plans to destroy it. Naturally only the combination of Tomoru, Kanzaki and Orgun can defeat them.

Director Masami Obari (Fatal Fury) handles the action sequences, space battles, and fist fights between giant robots with his usual skill. He's less successful at presenting Hideki Kakinuma's convoluted story, a needlessly complicate d mixture of flashbacks, fantasies, quasi-religious mysticism and warnings about the dangers of tampering with human evolution that is simultaneously too complicated and too simple for its two-and-a-half-hour length. --Charles Solomon, Amazon.com

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The first and second part are really good and the animation by AIC (Animation Studio) is really awesome and old school, though the third part is where it really fails when even the characters themselves don't really know what's going on, the makers of this must not have know how to end the story since each episode was coming out months apart, though you've gotta give them points for creativity since they really did think out of the box for this one. My opinion, buy it when it's cheap because it's not worth it especially since it doesn't have the original Japanese Language track because Manga Entertainment just threw the vhs tapes they had onto this dvd, sloppy release indeed.

Extras:
Commentary by Johnathan Clements on First part only
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Format: DVD
This film is a bit too long! I might have given it 5 stars if they squeezed it into an hour and a half.
The story is about a man that is somehow linked to a robot, but no-one including himself knows why. A team of other robots are destroying the earth, but end up being the same humans from the future. A psychic is the only one that can link up to her future self to try and stop the robots from destroying them, for if they destroy earth, they will be destroying their own past.
This film has an excellent idea that hasn't been tried before as far as I know. Lots of action and a little romance on the side. Quite futuristic as well. Quite exciting to see the story behind the robots from the future.
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Format: DVD
Hi there,

A lot of folk who are into anime are more loyalalists than anything else. They've decided they 'love it to bits whatever and everyone else should too'. Some are deluded by the realisation that not all films are as good as Akira. However, to appreciate anime properly you should know a bit about where its come from. Each film, not just the genre.

Below are mixed reviews, some are more honest than others. The art work in Detonator Organ is very old. The concept art is still way beyond our western art in terms of mecha style though, because its all still so new to us as a whole. However, the background art work and general direction is very very old. Infact its 'Battle of the planets'esk. The story itself is a little slow but very good and by the time the film has finnished you should be very satisfied.

If you're into quirky 'save the planet from certain destruction' and 'mech' films, you will love this film. If you're an art and design style guru wanting to explore the glory of modern japanese animation, then look somewhere else. Try maybe 'steam boy' or 'metropolis' or if you're really wanting cutting edge, try 'spirits within'.
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By A Customer on 26 Aug. 2002
Format: VHS Tape
By that I mean that, for an Anime film dealing with giant Mechs and psychic powers, this is one peice of Manga that doesn't deal in religious mysticism as it reaches its climax. There's nothing wrong with that at all. It means the story lends itself better to narrative. Just don't expect too much of a message.
One of the ferrivorous appeals of Anime is that it's like watching your most ecstatic, high-pitched boyhood/girlhood fantasies come true. The kind of stories you made up in your head when you were a kid playing the SNES. They often take place in advanced, futuristic cities or in space, involve some kind of massive robot/starship/battle and always end in some kinetic, wayward frenzy. Orgun follows that pattern. The budget required to make it into a live action movie would alleviate the national debts of seven third-world countries.
The story commences in the year 2292. A young student named Tomaru lives in a hyper-clean futuristic city floating above the Earth's equator. Life holds little thrills for him as he explains to his friends. He is saddled with depression at the thought of leaving University to spend the rest of his life working a futile, empty existence. His only means of escape is via the use of a video-game like console that attaches to the head during sleep, giving one the ability to play games in one's dreams. But soon, something strange begins to happen. Tomaru's dreams start being invaded by visions of a giant robot that seems to know who he is and begs him, vaguely, to fight. Around the same time, the Earth's military forces are nearing completion of a project they began a year prior to the film's beginning, when they began to recieve a signal from an unknown and unexplored sector of the galaxy.
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Format: VHS Tape
Being quite a manga fan I am able to safely say that I have sampled most of its genres within. From Samurai inspired ones such as Ninja scroll and sword for truth, to more psychological thrillers like Perfect blue. One style that has constantly been a success is the Mecha/futuristic sci-fi area, being a fan of such sagas as Zeoraima and Guyver I embraced Detonator Orgun with an open mind.
The plot itself is both complex and simplistic and takes a while to get started. Tomoru Shindo a young adult who is obsessed with an archaic sense of taste decides that the machine controlled world he belongs to being boring wishes for more action. With the arrival of Orgun he has his wish granted albeit in a much higher proportion than he could have ever expected.
What is good about this film is the combat scenes, from the city wide battle at the start to the awesome real time space war at the end you feel gripped during these scenes.
However the main weakness of this film is that it is way too long. Any film to last two and half hours successfully must have a diverse enough plot to grip but not bore and this is a problem for detonator orgun. The film has essentially the correct approach and has a solid plot involving a mysterious enemy intent on destroying all in its path and the way that Earth is a sitting duck to this new threat. However the plot simply does not survive without dipping into the realms of tedious and ridiculousness. The chants of Orgun by the commander of the enemy just gets annoying and the romantic plot of Tomoru and the woman scientist professor Kanzaki just seems wooden, typically love at first sight Mills and Boon trash.
However I feel that I am being over critical here.
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