The Desert Spear: Demon Trilogy, Book 2

4.4 out of 5 stars 310 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 28 hours and 10 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers Limited
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 29 April 2010
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003K18MLU

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Everyone here reading this review must have read and enjoyed the first book, otherwise they wouldn't bother to move on to the second. It's really a shame for me to write about how it disappointed me, as the Painted Man was one of the best fantasy releases I've seen in a while.

While I, to a certain extent, enjoyed reading the first half of the book, which is a recount of Jardirs life, I can imagine a lot of people will find it grating that the first half of the second book, in terms of time line, only brings us to the end of the first book again. I can see why it was done, we need the introduction to Abban, Jardirs Jiwah Ka and to a certain amount the culture they live by (It's a shame we don't get much more out of Jardir that we hadn't gleamed from book one). However, for a section of the book that was, in all essence, a character introduction. So while important it stole a lot more of the book than seemed entirely necessary.

We then move on to the second half of the book, dedicated to Arlen. From here on out until they leave Angiers, the books pace takes on a snail like quality. There are a lot of words dedicated to nothing in particular, we're introduced to how the Hollow has changed, charged glass, Rojers apprentices and a few other bits and pieces. But seeing as the whole first half of the book made no attempt to continue down the plot line, I would hope that some attempt to do so would start appearing at this point.

During the meeting with the duke in Angiers there at last seems to be a feeling of movement, yes we have to sit through the meeting twice, which holds a certain amount of comedic value, but little else, and by this point in the book I was hungry for development, as I was starting to become aware I'd read a lot more than I hadn't.
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Format: Hardcover
What a shame that this book is so poor quality when the first novel in this series was (in my view anyway) a tremendous success.

The first and most important thing to know about this book is that it is far too long. It opens with 186 pages of the back story of Jadir which is incredibly tedious and other than the extra insight it gives to the character it doesn't really add a great deal to the progression of the story. The culture of his people and his place in it might have been interesting if it weren't at the expense of a the rest of the story that I had bought this book to read.

When finally the other characters who stared in the first book return to the main stage we find ourselves locked in an endless and repetitive cycle of pining love interests, self denial from the main character and pretty much the same stories that we were told in the last edition in this series. Other than the possession of fighting runes by the characters in this novel the story was much the same as the previous novel only not nearly so well written.

The only area in which this story really progresses is that the Krasnians begin their invasion of the rest of the world (something that is written in the blurb of the book) but even this story line comes to an abrupt halt when the characters from Deliverer's Hollow meet the advancing army. What follows is a drawn out romance between two of the title characters that has no place in this novel as both characters have to forget who they are and their histories in order to progress with it. Eventually they return to the status quo anyway so it is another distracting sideline that could have been ignored.
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By A. Whitehead TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 April 2010
Format: Hardcover
In the city of Krasia a young boy grows to manhood and becomes a skilled warrior and charismatic warleader. His name is Jardir, and he feels destined to become the new Deliverer, a warrior who will lead humanity to victory over the murderous demons who rise from the Core every night. A man comes from the green lands to the north, Arlen, who impresses Jardir with his fighting skills. When Arlen finds a cache of weapons belonging to the first Deliverer, Jardir feels he has to betray Arlen, steal his weapons and leave him to die in the desert.

Several years later, the army of Krasia boils out of the desert and begins conquering the green cities. But Jardir heads rumours that the northerners have their own Deliverer, a mighty warrior known as the Painted Man who can fend off demons with wards etched into his skin. As Jardir continues his conquests, the Painted Man is forced to confront the sins of his own past as well as a new breed of demons, smarter and more cunning than any who have previously appeared.

The Desert Spear is the second volume of the five-volume Demon Cycle, following up 2008's The Painted Man (aka The Warded Man in the USA), one of the stronger fantasy debuts of recent years (although the amusing fact the novel was almost entirely written on a Blackberry on the author's morning commute seemed to attract more attention). This sequence is interesting because Brett has created a 'points of light' fantasy setting, where areas of civilisation are few and far between and the lands in between are infested with monsters and dangers. Few fantasy novels have codified the concept as well as Brett has done in these two books, where simply walking down a road at night is suicide.
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