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The Deluge: The Great War and the Remaking of Global Order 1916-1931 by [Tooze, Adam]
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The Deluge: The Great War and the Remaking of Global Order 1916-1931 Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews

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Review

"For anyone seeking to understand how American predominance was achieved in the years after World War I, and why it catastrophically failed to keep the hard-won peace, Adam Tooze has written an essential book. Epic in scope, boldly argumentative, deftly interweaving military and economic narratives, "The Deluge" is a splendid interpretive history." -- "The New York Times Book Review"
"A grand and groundbreaking reinterpretation of World War I and its aftermath."--"Minneapolis Star Tribune "
"A globe-spanning and wide-ranging examination of how America's historic decision to join that epochal war changed the U.S. as well as the entire world order, 'The Deluge' is also a look at a past that is both terribly remote and hauntingly familiar."--"Salon "
"Massive, well-researched and eminently readable."--"The Washington Times"
"Tooze guides us through the numerous diplomatic and economic catastrophes that emerged from World War I. Eventually we start to get a well-rounded and extremely comprehensive insight into why Wilson's American foreign policy was so misguided.... Excellent... provide[s] us with a superb insight into the collapse of a stable Europe."--"The Daily Beast"
"Tooze's analysis, particularly of fears the American capitalist juggernaut provoked, should spark debate, especially in scholarly circles."--"Booklist"
"A thoroughly researched, much-needed reexamination of America's role in the aftermath of World War I that will appeal to any reader interested in the interwar period."-- "Library Journal"," Michael""Farrell, Reformed Theological Seminary, Orlando, FL"
"In this landmark study, Tooze offers an elegant account of the reordering of great-power relations that took place after World War I, at the dawn of 'the American century.'"-- "Foreign Affairs," G. John Ikenberry
"Adam Tooze's utterly hypnotic study reaches back to a time in which fragile economies across the world were every bit as intertwined and acutely vulnerable, and where unforeseen economic shocks could be enough to trigger apocalyptic bloodshed. What Adam Tooze has done--a huge, formidable achievement--is to reconstruct a vast global web, and to show how the slightest vibrations on its threads had consequences everywhere, almost regardless of individual fears and hates or venomous ideologies. The breadth of his scholarship also frighteningly illuminates the fragility of peace." -- "The Telegraph" (UK)
"Tooze shows, more emphatically than any other scholar I have read, how decisively and how sweepingly the First World War ended this state of affairs....Tooze's brilliant account also offers much food for thought for any observer of the current international scene." --"The Guardian"
""The Deluge" sets a provocative framework for studies of the Great War, one that places issues of US power and American history at the center. Its well-written critique of US leadership and its insightful account of the intricate policies of the major powers deserve a wide readership among those who wish to understand how the world careened from the Great War into the Great Depression." --"Current History"
"Bold and ambitious... "The Deluge "is the work of a fine historian at the peak of his powers, formidable in its range and command of the material, written in strong, muscular prose.... The best of the current deluge of books about the first world war."--Ben Shephard, "The Observer "(UK)
"[Tooze's] new book confirms his stature as an analyst of hugely complex political and economic issues.... Here, as in his earlier work, Tooze shows himself a formidably impressive chronicler of a critical period of modern history, unafraid of bold judgments."--Max Hastings, "The Sunday Times "(UK)
"Tooze's book is an invaluable account of why the US and its allies, having defeated Germany in 1918, were unable thereafter to stabilise the world economy and build a collective security system."--"The Financial Times "
"Amid all the current commemorative news, a clear and compelling rationale as to why it is actually worth going back and looking at the era of the First World War at this particular moment in time."--Neil Gregor, "Literary Review"

"From the Hardcover edition."

Winner of the 2015 Los Angeles Times Book Prize -- History
For anyone seeking to understand how American predominance was achieved in the years after World War I, and why it catastrophically failed to keep the hard-won peace, Adam Tooze has written an essential book. Epic in scope, boldly argumentative, deftly interweaving military and economic narratives, "The Deluge" is a splendid interpretive history. "The New York Times Book Review"
A grand and groundbreaking reinterpretation of World War I and its aftermath. "Minneapolis Star Tribune "
A globe-spanning and wide-ranging examination of how America s historic decision to join that epochal war changed the U.S. as well as the entire world order, The Deluge is also a look at a past that is both terribly remote andhauntingly familiar. "Salon "
Massive, well-researched and eminently readable. "The Washington Times"
Tooze guides us through the numerous diplomatic and economic catastrophes that emerged from World War I. Eventually we start to get a well-rounded and extremely comprehensive insight into why Wilson s American foreign policy was so misguided.... Excellent... provide[s] us with a superb insight into the collapse of a stable Europe. "The Daily Beast"
Tooze s analysis, particularly of fears the American capitalist juggernaut provoked, should spark debate, especially in scholarly circles. "Booklist"
A thoroughly researched, much-needed reexamination of America s role in the aftermath of World War I that will appeal to any reader interested in the interwar period. "Library Journal"," Michael" "Farrell, Reformed Theological Seminary, Orlando, FL"
In this landmark study, Tooze offers an elegant account of the reordering of great-power relations that took place after World War I, at the dawn of the American century. "Foreign Affairs," G. John Ikenberry
Adam Tooze s utterly hypnotic study reaches back to a time in which fragile economies across the world were every bit as intertwined and acutely vulnerable, and where unforeseen economic shocks could be enough to trigger apocalyptic bloodshed. What Adam Tooze has done a huge, formidable achievement is to reconstruct a vast global web, and to show how the slightest vibrations on its threads had consequences everywhere, almost regardless of individual fears and hates or venomous ideologies. The breadth of his scholarship also frighteningly illuminates the fragility of peace. "The Telegraph" (UK)
Tooze shows, more emphatically than any other scholar I have read, how decisively and how sweepingly the First World War ended this state of affairs .Tooze's brilliant account also offers much food for thought for any observer of the current international scene. "The Guardian"
"The Deluge" sets a provocative framework for studies of the Great War, one that places issues of US power and American history at the center. Its well-written critique of US leadership and its insightful account of the intricate policies of the major powers deserve a wide readership among those who wish to understand how the world careened from the Great War into the Great Depression. "Current History"
Bold and ambitious... "The Deluge "is the work of a fine historian at the peak of his powers, formidable in its range and command of the material, written in strong, muscular prose.... The best of the current deluge of books about the first world war. Ben Shephard, "The Observer "(UK)
[Tooze s] new book confirms his stature as an analyst of hugely complex political and economic issues . Here, as in his earlier work, Tooze shows himself a formidably impressive chronicler of a critical period of modern history, unafraid of bold judgments. Max Hastings, "The Sunday Times "(UK)
Tooze s book is an invaluable account of why the US and its allies, having defeated Germany in 1918, were unable thereafter to stabilise the world economy and build a collective security system. "The Financial Times "
Amid all the current commemorative news, a clear and compelling rationale as to why it is actually worth going back and looking at the era of the First World War at this particular moment in time. Neil Gregor, "Literary Review"

"From the Hardcover edition.""

Winner of the 2015 Los Angeles Times Book Prize -- History

"For anyone seeking to understand how American predominance was achieved in the years after World War I, and why it catastrophically failed to keep the hard-won peace, Adam Tooze has written an essential book. Epic in scope, boldly argumentative, deftly interweaving military and economic narratives, The Deluge is a splendid interpretive history." -- The New York Times Book Review

"A grand and groundbreaking reinterpretation of World War I and its aftermath."--Minneapolis Star Tribune

"A globe-spanning and wide-ranging examination of how America's historic decision to join that epochal war changed the U.S. as well as the entire world order, 'The Deluge' is also a look at a past that is both terribly remote and hauntingly familiar."--Salon

"Massive, well-researched and eminently readable."--The Washington Times

"Tooze guides us through the numerous diplomatic and economic catastrophes that emerged from World War I. Eventually we start to get a well-rounded and extremely comprehensive insight into why Wilson's American foreign policy was so misguided.... Excellent... provide[s] us with a superb insight into the collapse of a stable Europe."--The Daily Beast

"Tooze's analysis, particularly of fears the American capitalist juggernaut provoked, should spark debate, especially in scholarly circles."--Booklist

"A thoroughly researched, much-needed reexamination of America's role in the aftermath of World War I that will appeal to any reader interested in the interwar period."-- Library Journal, Michael Farrell, Reformed Theological Seminary, Orlando, FL

"In this landmark study, Tooze offers an elegant account of the reordering of great-power relations that took place after World War I, at the dawn of 'the American century.'"-- Foreign Affairs, G. John Ikenberry

"Adam Tooze's utterly hypnotic study reaches back to a time in which fragile economies across the world were every bit as intertwined and acutely vulnerable, and where unforeseen economic shocks could be enough to trigger apocalyptic bloodshed. What Adam Tooze has done--a huge, formidable achievement--is to reconstruct a vast global web, and to show how the slightest vibrations on its threads had consequences everywhere, almost regardless of individual fears and hates or venomous ideologies. The breadth of his scholarship also frighteningly illuminates the fragility of peace." -- The Telegraph (UK)

"Tooze shows, more emphatically than any other scholar I have read, how decisively and how sweepingly the First World War ended this state of affairs....Tooze's brilliant account also offers much food for thought for any observer of the current international scene." --The Guardian

"The Deluge sets a provocative framework for studies of the Great War, one that places issues of US power and American history at the center. Its well-written critique of US leadership and its insightful account of the intricate policies of the major powers deserve a wide readership among those who wish to understand how the world careened from the Great War into the Great Depression." --Current History

"Bold and ambitious... The Deluge is the work of a fine historian at the peak of his powers, formidable in its range and command of the material, written in strong, muscular prose.... The best of the current deluge of books about the first world war."--Ben Shephard, The Observer (UK)

"[Tooze's] new book confirms his stature as an analyst of hugely complex political and economic issues.... Here, as in his earlier work, Tooze shows himself a formidably impressive chronicler of a critical period of modern history, unafraid of bold judgments."--Max Hastings, The Sunday Times (UK)

"Tooze's book is an invaluable account of why the US and its allies, having defeated Germany in 1918, were unable thereafter to stabilise the world economy and build a collective security system."--The Financial Times

"Amid all the current commemorative news, a clear and compelling rationale as to why it is actually worth going back and looking at the era of the First World War at this particular moment in time."--Neil Gregor, Literary Review

From the Hardcover edition.

From the Inside Flap

In the depths of the Great War, with millions of dead and no imaginable end to the conflict, societies around the world began to buckle. As the cataclysmic battles continued, a new global order was being born.

Adam Tooze's panoramic new book tells a radical, new story of the struggle for global mastery from the battles of the Western Front in 1916 to the Great Depression of the 1930s. The war shook the foundations of political and economic order across Eurasia. Empires that had lasted since the Middle Ages collapsed into ruins. New nations sprang up. Strikes, street-fighting and revolution convulsed much of the world. And beneath the surface turmoil, the war set in motion a deeper and more lasting shift, a transformation that continues to shape the present day: 1916 was the year when world affairs began to revolve around the United States.

America was both a uniquely powerful global force: a force that was forward-looking, the focus of hope, money and ideas, and at the same time elusive, unpredictable and in fundamental respects unwilling to confront these unwished for responsibilities. Tooze shows how the fate of effectively the whole of civilization - the British Empire, the future of peace in Europe, the survival of the Weimar Republic, both the Russian and Chinese revolutions and stability in the Pacific - now came to revolve around this new power's fraught relationship with a shockingly changed world.

The Deluge is both a brilliantly illuminating exploration of the past and an essential history for the present.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 11034 KB
  • Print Length: 609 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0670024929
  • Publisher: Allen Lane (29 May 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00K6Y0HIU
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #125,120 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a fascinating, ground-breaking piece of historical writing, truly relevant to our times. Tooze is an economic historian, and he writes here about the aftermath of World war One, and the interim years of intermittent crises that culminated in the Great Depression of the 1930s. Most historians tend to view these years as a series of non-events, separating the botched peace of Versailles and the catastrophes of militarized regimes in Germany, Italy and Japan. Tooze shows that great efforts were made in these years, via what he terms liberal realpolitik, to create a stable liberal order. Certainly, the peace wasn't a great achievement (Tooze is kinder to its authors, most of all Clemenceau but even Lloyd George and Woodrow Wilson, than some) but efforts were made to diminish its bad effects - through endless efforts to diminish the effect of debts and reparations. There was an effort to disarm, and his account of the League of Nations is not as negative as those of most historians. Bad luck as well as bad economics dogged these liberal efforts, but there was also an imbalance between real power, increasingly held in the U.S., which remained reluctant to use it creatively; and the diminished liberal practitioners in France and Britain, who now lacked power to impose their ideas. In Tooze's nuanced account, these bad fits in the world come to seem tragic. But they also highlight the notion of how badly the world needs and open order, based on freedoms and compatible with some form of wold supervision. Such an order, Tooze believes, half existed in the 1920s, and it came to flower after the second global catastrophe, by 1950.Read more ›
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An excellent read. A excellent book. The only history book you'll ever have to read if you wish to be enlightened about the EU and Germany's constant European land grab aspirations that are still playing out today. Well written and ultra informative about the deadly and murky world of elitist politics. Couldn't put it down. Buy it.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent work of history. It describes the consequences of the First World War, and addresses a period of history that is less well covered than it might be. Especially interesting is the description of German influence on the Russian Revolution during 1917/18 and the consequences of that co-operation.
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A very wide-ranging and insightful history of a period. This period determined the end of Western European empires and their influence and confirmed the ascent of the USA to an unassailable position; a position which only the Soviet Union and China have come close to challenging. Whilst it is quite detailed, the logic of the narrative is never questionable, a truly excellent book and one I shall recommend to all.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Adam Tooze's latest book is another excellent work to be added to his previous ones on the Nazi economy, and the statistical innovation in Germany between 1900 and 1945. Both of these were ground-breaking and were books of unusual originality and meticulous research. Previously at Cambridge University he is now Professor of History at Yale.

In his new book he addresses the events of 1919 to 1939, and asks 'Why did the western powers lose their grip in such a spectacular fashion?'. His thesis is that the chief culprit by far was the USA. It was America's failure to 'cooperate with the efforts of the French, British, Germans and the Japanese to stabilise the world economy and establish new institutions of collective security ' that caused the problems that emerged after the Great War ended in 1918. He denounces the USA for this. He clearly thinks little of President Wilson.

After the Armistice, an error that allowed Germany to claim she had not been defeated, representatives laboured for 6 months before signing what came to be called the Treaty of Versailles. They had faced enormously complex problems in a world fragmented and in turmoil. 65 million men had been mobilised from around the globe. At least 9 million lay dead, and some 21 million more were wounded, diseased or mutilated. It has been estimated that each day deaths on the battlefield were 10 times greater than in the American Civil War. Some 22 million civilians had been killed or wounded. Famine was rife across parts of Europe-Germany was still blockaded. In many capitals there was bitter fighting. At least 14 wars raged. Thousands of square miles of France had been devastated. In Poland, and elsewhere,there was rampant inflation-prices in Russia had risen by a factor of 400,000,000!
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I bought this book on the strength of the excellent reviews it has received, but it has proved to be an expensive disappointment.

On the plus side, it does at least provide an overview of international developments from 1916 through to 1931, albeit hampered by stodgy writing and a disjointed narrative. Nonetheless, these would not be fatal errors if this work were to provide some worthwhile new insight or introduce some important new informaton: sadly, however, it does neither.

What we are left with is really no more than a tired feeling "liberal establishment" account of the period that represents no advance over previous works. Moreover, it is one that often has a worryingly superficial feel as the author skates over events like the 1920-21 "deflation" and the Great Depression without ever really offering any explanation of what was happening or why it was important. Very often one is left asking questions like "why has he mentioned this?" and "what's he trying to say?" and so on. The same superficiality is also evident in his discussion of military affairs, where various careless mistakes are evident eg calling battleship Mutsu a "cruiser" and so on. I also cannot help wondering whether Wilson was quite as keen to keep the USA out of the war as Tooze suggests.

A glance at the bibliography raises other concerns: this is a book overhwhelmingly based on secondary sources in English and German, with the latter coming a very poor second. Can such a sweeping and overarching narrative, making the claims that it does, safely rest on such narrow foundations?
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