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The Defenestration of St Martin
 
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The Defenestration of St Martin

25 Nov. 2012 | Format: MP3

7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 8.52 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Srl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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By Andy Sweeney TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 31 Dec. 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Back in the days of Britpop, there were a band called Gene who were loved by many, hated by plenty for, supposedly, being a rip-off of The Smiths but largely ignored or treated with indifference by most. The biggest problem about Gene is that not enough people actually listened to them, which is a crying shame, because they were actually a brilliant bunch of musicians with some killer songs. They faded away at the very start of the 21st century and became little more than the occasional feature in music magazines' "Whatever happened to..." column. I was one of the people who loved Gene. This is why the announcement of a solo album by Martin Rossiter, the distinctive singer of Gene really piqued my interest and I bought it, blindly, without knowing anything about it, other than the title. I'm so glad I did.

Without any hyperbole, this album really is one of the very best things I have heard all year. With nine out of the ten tracks featuring little more than Rossiter's voice and a piano, this could have quite easily been dull and samey. The usually brilliant Rufus Wainwright, for example, sorely tested my patience with his 2010 piano and voice album, All Days Are Nights: Songs For Lulu. However, Martin's songs - all of them - are absolutely magnificent, meaningful, personal, emotional pieces with the music and lyrics allowed the space to express their meaning and each track being a thing of shimmering beauty. It's very difficult to choose between the tracks, the opening track "Three Points On A Compass" is remarkable, the piano work on "Where There Are Pixels" is simply gorgeous and the bit where the band kick into life on the last track "Let The Waves Carry You" is a truly great moment, but each and every song on this album is superb. Gene certainly were a great band, but this album has become the singularly greatest thing that Rossiter has put his name to - and I don't think anyone saw that coming, apart from Martin himself, maybe...?
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Format: MP3 Download
This simple album brings home all the wonderful songwriting of Martin Rossiter without any further complication of pigeon-holing or forcing into a 'genre'
There are several genres for this beautiful work of art - perfection, stunning, outstanding - would be my tags if i ever got round to filing this album; which not be going on the shelf for a while!

Cracking set of songs and every accolade is absolutely deserved.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Cast out, and unjustly forgotten by the cloth-eared ambulance chasers that are the press and media, Martin Rossiter - vocal god, formerly of Gene, who suffered by being brilliant surrounded by sludge that drowned them in a screaming morass of mediocre options such as Shed Seven and Menswear - breaks cover with his first solo record. With just a voice and a piano, Rossiter writes songs that are so much further on from any of his then contemporaries, it's embarrassing for the rest, in what will become for me, very probably, my record of the year.

"Three Points On A Compass", just one man and a piano, is a ten minute eulogy on the nature of absent fathers. The only thing you gave me was this name, this stupid name. Whereas many of his contemporaries create a tinderbox of wrapping and lies to obscure the fact there is nothing at the heart of the work, and nothing for them to say, and it is all guitars and lights signifying nothing, Rossiter takes the opposite approach that less is more, and in this, a beautiful, sincere album, one man and a piano explore the world in a way that is both timeless and relevant, as if the outside world is just clouds around who we are. When you look at the world, and how we live within it, like an astronaut would after landing, how absurd is life? Here, Martin addresses the heart and the mind and the soul, not merely in the context of the world, but with an acute understanding of what it is that makes a man a man. Though there is a mild touch of Queen in "I Must Be Jesus", though that is no bad thing at all.

These are not necessarily easy songs : not for this the sudden pop rush of a song from fifteen years ago, but a considered and careful song. The world has changed since the last millenia and this must have done the same.
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Format: MP3 Download Verified Purchase
Simple and Stunning. Just one of the best voices in the business and a simple piano.
Stripped to the minimum this shows off the wonderful clear voice of Rossiter and the pure craftmanship of top quality songwriting at is absolute best.
Melancholic, disturbing, thought provoking and yet haunting and beautiful.
I have always loved Rossiters voice and songwriting since Gene first hit the stage but this takes him and his gift to a whole new level.
If this doesnt get a Mercury nomination next year then I will eat the winning album.
Thank You Mr Rossiter
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By The Wolf TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 8 Dec. 2012
Format: Audio CD
'Three Points Of A Compass', the opening song on Martin Rossiter's album,
is hard to listen to. Here's a man baring his soul, cleaning out his closet
and reconciling himself to the past in words and music of such raw, burning
intensity that our throats tighten and although tempted to look away from
the brutally self-evident pain we are rooted to the spot like a rabbit caught
in the headlights. Not since I first heard Nick Cave's sublime 'Into Your Arms'
have I heard a composition which put my head and heart into such a spin.
It makes you want to reach out and give him a big hug; he sounds so horribly
alone and in a very dark place. The experience is emotionally overwhelming.

'The Defenestration Of St Martin' is a bold piece of work. Largely scored for
voice and piano, these ten stripped-down and tightly structured songs may
well prove Mr Rossiter to be one of the finest writers of his generation.
He has a very fine voice; a rich baritone; his diction precise and implacably
English; a perfectly-judged subtle vibrato adding further depth and texture.

Although the first number is a hard act to follow there are, nonetheless, a
great many more treasures evident in the set. The mood of the album rarely
falters : introspective, confessional and unrelentingly personal, these are the
outpourings of a man trying to find peace with himself with visceral honesty.

Whether in the quasi-medieval elegance of 'Sing It Loud'; the powerful anthemic
ebb and flow of 'Where Are The Pixels' and the delicate moonlit warmth and more
hopeful sentiments of 'Darling Sorrow' (where love and redemption appear, for a
few moments, at least possible), we are transfixed by Mr Rossiter's melancholy muse.
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