Buy Used
£8.39
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from the UK. Former Library books. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Your purchase also supports literacy charities.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Decipherment of Linear B Hardcover – 1 Apr 1970

5.0 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover, 1 Apr 1970
£2,061.73 £8.39
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 174 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 2nd Revised edition edition (1 April 1970)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521045991
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521045995
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 2 x 20 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,015,887 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'In this present short book - lucid, concise and admirable - Chadwick tells us something of Ventris and his mind, and of the problems involved in the decipherment of Minoan-Mycenaean scripts. It is written for the layman and very well written. It is not only an account of a startling piece of philological and archaeological research, but a simple, moving human story.' The Spectator --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

The languages of the ancient world and the mysterious scripts, long undeciphered, in which they were encoded have represented one of the most intriguing problems of classical archaeology in modern times. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 9 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
The decipherment of this ancient Mycenaean script from about 1400 BC was one of the great mystery stories of the 20th Century. John Chadwick is an expert in archaic Greek, who assisted Michael Ventris in deciphering the thousands of clay tablets discovered in the ruins of Knossos and Pylos. Ventris's demonstration that the language was an archaic form of Greek rocked the world of Ancient Greek history. In this book, Chadwick gives a popular account of the decipherment, somewhat light on the technical details of Ventris's discoveries, but with a good section on what the translated records show of Mycenaean society. The book was written in the 1950s but has a modern postscript which shows that most of the original findings still stand today.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This book was recommended to me, and I read it in the early 1960s. I did not think it would appeal to me in the very least, but in fact I was enthralled by it as a brilliant detective story. I love the quote (from memory, so probably wrong), "How do you tell the Greek curator of a Greek museum that the mysterious language inscribed on this artifact in their care is actually - Greek ?"
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is a very well written book. However,I would only recommend it to those who have at least a good interest in codes; otherwise it will be a waste of money and time. But for those who bear a real enthusiasm for the topic will be able to better appreciate, understand and value the information it provides the reader with.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This slim volume elegantly and concisely describes the process by which Michael Ventris deciphered the Linear B script. The story is worth telling, not least because Ventris was an amateur scholar - working as a professional architect while pursuing this work as a hobby in his spare time. It was written by Ventris' close collaborator, John Chadwick, shortly after the decipherment and this proximity to the events described allows Chadwick to convey to the reader some of the excitement of discovery.

The book was prepared for the general reader so does not require any great specialist knowledge. As such, it is heartily recommended to anyone with an interest in learning more about the topic. The story is made poignant by the tragic death in a road accident of Michael Ventris in 1956, a couple of years after the main events described. Chadwick's own sense of loss can be seen through the text.

My copy dates from 1961 so lacks the later postscript but, such was the quality of the original work by Ventris and Chadwick, the content remains relevant today in all its essentials.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I first read this book many years ago, and have re-read it at intervals since, always with pleasure, and with gradually deepening understanding (despite the accessible style, there is too much subtlety to get it all first time round).

The subject matter is both a fascinating intellectual journey and a tragedy, given that the person mainly responsible for the decipherment, Michael Ventris, died in a motor accident not long after his triumph. One wonders what he might have achieved had he lived: perhaps even a real contribution towards understanding the enigma of the Phaistos Disk, otherwise a happy hunting ground for a swarm of hopeful if mostly unconvincing "translators" ever since?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback