Buy Used
£6.30
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Death of Socrates: Hero, Villain, Chatterbox, Saint Hardcover – 26 Jul 2007

4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover, 26 Jul 2007
£23.50 £6.30
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Profile Books (26 July 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 186197762X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1861977625
  • Product Dimensions: 14.4 x 2.7 x 20.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 714,834 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

[A] spritely and illuminating account of the events surrounding Socrates' execution... [A]lways informative and enjoyable. (Carolyne Larrington TLS)

About the Author

Emily Wilson is Associate Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Educated at Oxford and Yale, she is the author of "Mocked with Death: Tragic overliving from Sophocles to Milton" (2004), translator of "Six Tragedies of Seneca" (2009), and classics editor for the Norton Anthology of World Literature.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
A fascinating, provocative work which forces us to see Socrates in a new light. Challenges us to look beyond the hagiography to the real Socrates. Written in an engaging and witty style, this book wears its considerable scholarship lightly. Highly recommended.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This book is great for anyone remotely interested in Socrates and I would recommend it to anyone looking for a comprehensive introduction to him. Each chapter gives you a different angle on him from different interpretations throughout history to the present day. Wilson explains the philosophy of the man as well, and arguably to a greater extent she looks at the influence he has had on thought through out the ages.

At the end of the book there is also a very good further reading section split into relevant chapters which is very helpful especially for those interested in a particular angle on the great philosopher.

Overall a very good book for anyone interested in one of the most influential philosophers of all time.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This is a very fresh and easy to understand narrative about Socrates and his afterlife in the mentality of western civilization.

The author writes exceptionally good and produceds some very worthwhile observations. If you only read one book on Socrates, make it this one. However, if you want a more heavy-duty take on Socrates, there are "heavier" titles out there.

Recommended!
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book describes what Socrates was in favour of and why he died, and even, why he had to die.
He had to die to underline in an unmistakeable way, the importance of freedom of speech. It truly is something worth dieing for.
Freedom of speech is, as far as he was concerned,a matter of simple conversation. You say what's on your mind and the other person says what's on their mind.
Nobody says 'you can't say that'.
THIS NOT WHAT WE HAVE NOW.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars 7 reviews
17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A truly masterful treatment of an old subject 27 Nov. 2007
By J. Adams - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I suspect there are few others in history besides Christ who have had more books written about his death and its meaning than Socrates. From Plato, his student and other contemporaries such as Xenophon, through many centuries where he was adopted by other skeptics of the prevailing social order such as Erasmus, who called him a saint, the trial and circumstances of the death sentence imposed on him, and his willingness to carry it out have resulted in many adopters of his cause.
As a libertarian myself, I have always thought that much of what Socrates was ultimately about was to force people to ask questions about "established" wisdom; one of the most threatening things that can be done in any social order. Doing this at a time when there were many gods supposedly looking after ancient Athens was really no different than those who went to their deaths in Stalin's gulags; a timeless threat to those who rule by consensus or complete control.

Wilson has obviously spent many years researching her subject and has come up with her own theories about just why Socrates was given the death sentence, and they deserve just as much deference as many others which have been equally well "established" by others who studied the man and the era.
This is a really great book about a wonderful topic and one of the few I have read on the subject that i plan to keep in my library.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A refreshing new look at a legendary life 12 Feb. 2008
By Giles Fair - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This witty, erudite book forces us to look again at one of the founders of Western civilisation. Going beyond hagiography, this book is highly readable and scholarly, accessible to students but serious and original enough for specialists. I recommend it highly.
5.0 out of 5 stars She acknowledges a conflict that so many modern fans of Socrates must have—a conflict between their admiration of a man who rele 5 Feb. 2016
By G.G. Grace - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I found Professor Wilson’s book invaluable in the course of writing a novel, Sophronikos, Son of Sokrates, not so much because of what I didn’t know about the historical figure Socrates, nobody really knows much about him; I found it invaluable because of Wilson’s candor early on. She acknowledges a conflict that so many modern fans of Socrates must have—a conflict between their admiration of a man who relentlessly pursued Truth and their disappointment in him because of his ostensible lack of attention to his family: “I find Socrates’ family life—of lack of it—particularly difficult to admire,” Wilson says. “It is hard to respect a man who neglected his wife and sons in order to spend his time drinking and chatting with his friends about the definitions of common words.” So immediately I felt that I had in hand a work by someone who had given thought to the man “in the round,” as theater people might say.

We can level complaints at Wilson because of that statement, that maybe one shouldn’t judge Socrates with modern sensibilities, that maybe things were different back in the day, that maybe we’re actually talking Plato here rather than Socrates; but when a modern reader does some digging, he or she will certainly, at some point, be struck by this apparent “lack” in our icon Socrates. He had three sons, a wife or two (we’re not really sure how many wives), and for whatever reasons, he chose to drink poison and off himself when, according to tradition, friends and admirers had provided him an opportunity to escape. And this to me as a writer was something that I was very interested in; that “lack” must have had a direct and deep impact on his oikos. Wilson is one of the few scholars I came across who have directly criticized him because of this, and for that I commend her.

This is a fine book to add to a collection, and I recommend it without reservation. Hopefully in the future she’ll make it available as an ebook. If you’re interested in Socrates try others as well by Waterfield, Hughes, Stone, Vlastos, Navia, McPherran, and of course the primary sources we have on Socrates.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Book 5 Feb. 2008
By Peter Browning - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I have read several books on Socrates and found this one well written; a refreshing look at an historical figure often referred to but not well understood.
4.0 out of 5 stars Uses and abuses of Socrates death in history 26 Jun. 2016
By T. Kepler - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Well researched book on the use of Socrates' death in history as symbolic fact and metaphor. I take issue with author's reference of prisoners' rights to a proper hearing when applied to terrorist combatants held at Guantanamo. They are military POWs and as such are not entitled to the same rights as U.S. citizens; is there any dispute to their guilt in fomenting and engaging in combat - certainly not the courageous kind their culture is unfamiliar with - against U.S. soldiers? Otherwise an impressive scholarly work.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback