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Death of a Scriptwriter (Hamish Macbeth Mysteries) Mass Market Paperback – 17 Oct 2003

4.5 out of 5 stars 66 customer reviews

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Mass Market Paperback, 17 Oct 2003
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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 198 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company; Reprint edition (17 Oct. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446606987
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446606981
  • Product Dimensions: 10.5 x 1.6 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,317,564 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

"SUPERB ENTERTAINMENT, AS RICH AND WARMING AS FINE MALT WHISKEY, AND EVERY BIT AS ADDICTIVE".

-- Houston Chronicle

Review

'Superb entertainment, as rich and warming as a fine malt whiskey, and every bit as addictive.' (Houston Chronicle) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
whats not to like another adventure with Hamish mcbeth
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
as usual a great read, really enjoyed. m c beat on never lets you down. always enjoy Agatha raisin and hamish mcbeth
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very entertaining. Enjoyable.
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Format: Hardcover
In "Death of a Scriptwriter," M.C. Beaton brings us the fourteenth installment of the Hamish Macbeth series--and she is in her element!
Set in the Scottish Highlands, in the village of Lochdubh, this series is a nice read--nothing too complicated, full of local Scottish color (with both its characters and its setting), lots of delightful red herrings, and logical solutions. This series, the titles of which always begin with "Death of a...," is quite a successful one and one which takes little time to read. Macbeth, the local constable, is proud of the fact that he is not an ambitious soul. Despite the fact that he has solved thirteen previous murders, he is still a constable. He refuses to be promoted as he claims he is too happy in Lochdubh to want to advance to a larger city. He is filled with lots of common sense and while often the villagers give him a hard time ("He's too lazy," they claim.), they highly respet him and have come to his rescue more
than once.
He's not so lucky with his own love life, however, and seems to fall in love with any woman who shows interest. The real love, Priscilla Smythe-Halliburton, has moved to London, after he had broken off the engagement, and appears intermittently in all the books of the series.
In "Death of a Scriptwriter," a television crew appears in Macbeth's bailiwick to film a novel written by an English spinster who has moved to Lochdubh. Her books were never much of a success, but this one was picked up by the BBC. She is delighted that at long last, fame is coming her way. She is so overjoyed that she fails to retain the complete rights to her book; a screen writer is hired to "modernize" the plot and characters (in other words, to add lots of sex and violence to the rather staid Victorian tale).
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Format: Paperback
In this 14th Hamish Macbeth murder mystery, author Patricia Martyn-Boyd has retired to the highlands. Although she hasn’t written a word for many years and her books are out of print, a television company decides to adapt one of her novels for television. However, trouble erupts between Patricia and the television company when they decide to make the rather boring books into a rather racy television production. When a murder happens, there are numerous people who wanted the victim dead. Although told to stay away from the case by his counterparts in Strathbane, Hamish decides to conduct his own investigation in attempt to catch the killer. However, as always, Hamish’s superiors in Strathbane just see him as an interfering village bobby.
This was a good, easy but enjoyable read which (like the previous book) kept me guessing to the very end.
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By Mr. D. L. Rees TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 11 July 2011
Format: Paperback
A television film crew descends on nearby dour Drim, the village "a living grave with resident ghouls". Elderly Patricia Martyn-Broyd's genteel detective novel is being dramatised, she unaware of the raunchy updating with a porn star as its lead....

Here is a volatile group comprising director, producer, stars, extras, long suffering assistants. Inflated egos, posturing frauds, ominous undercurrents are rampant - conditions ripe for a death or two. Scriptwriter Jamie Gallagher, an odious drunken bully, is the first to go - he found with crows pecking out his eyes. Hamish Macbeth discovers the body but, as usual, is shoved aside as blustering DCI Blair takes over the case.

One can imagine M.C. Beaton chuckling as she wrote this fourteenth adventure - the television crew that adapted her Hamish Macbeth stories, of course, NOTHING like this lot. Admittedly, though, they DID make many changes which irritated lovers of the books - the series nonetheless immensely popular. Watch out for one or two in-jokes. Plockton in Ross is suggested as a possible location. ("Plockton!" sneered Jamie. "Thon village has been used in two detective series already.") In fact it doubled as TV Hamish's Lochdubh. Anxious to challenge the restraints inflicted on peak time weekend viewing, Jamie asks, "Who the hell is going to object to pot smoking these days?" (Controversy flared when it was leaked Robert Carlyle's Hamish would be doing that on screen.)

The fun here includes the wily, unconventional constable continuing to hack into DCI Blair's computer (the everchanging password always an expletive), a minister's wife destined to shock her dour control freak husband, Hamish yet again triumphing as his bosses gape.

Yes, this is a glorious addition to the series - M.C. Beaton and Hamish both at their best.
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By lawyeraau HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 8 Mar. 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
From the moment that a group of filmmakers arrive in a town near the village Lochdubh in northern Scotland, Constable Hamish Macbeth has his hands full. The filmmakers are there to film a television series based upon some genteel cozy mysteries. The author's work, however, has undergone a complete revamp at the hands of a completely odious scriptwriter, who has changed the author's work into an unrecognizable sexual romp.

It appears that the aging author, in her initial delight at having her cozy mysteries being singled to be televised, did not read the fine print of her contract. Needless to say, the author is outraged at this travesty and is without recourse, having to grin and bear it. After all, she did sign a binding contract giving the filmmakers the right to make any changes in her work they see fit. Moreover, to add fuel to the fire, it appears that the local yokels have become star struck and are acting somewhat foolishly.

As dead bodies start to pile up, the author, villagers, cast, and crew get a thorough going over by Hamish. There are many twists and turns in this book, as any number of the characters in the book have had some sort of axe to grind with the dead. As always, the journey to discover just who the murderer is is great fun. The book is peppered with sly humor, some dotty villagers, and enjoyable characters. Those characters who are bumped off are usually quite unlikable, leaving the reader with no regrets about their departure. In this fourteenth book of the Hamish Macbeth series of cozy mysteries, the author does not disappoint.

As with all cozy mysteries, it is not so much the mystery that is of import but the characters that revolve around the mystery.
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