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Death of a Scriptwriter: Hamish Macbeth, Book 14 Audio Download – Unabridged

4.5 out of 5 stars 61 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 6 hours and 23 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Audible Studios
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 17 Dec. 2013
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00H3Y9R6O

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
In "Death of a Scriptwriter," M.C. Beaton brings us the fourteenth installment of the Hamish Macbeth series--and she is in her element!
Set in the Scottish Highlands, in the village of Lochdubh, this series is a nice read--nothing too complicated, full of local Scottish color (with both its characters and its setting), lots of delightful red herrings, and logical solutions. This series, the titles of which always begin with "Death of a...," is quite a successful one and one which takes little time to read. Macbeth, the local constable, is proud of the fact that he is not an ambitious soul. Despite the fact that he has solved thirteen previous murders, he is still a constable. He refuses to be promoted as he claims he is too happy in Lochdubh to want to advance to a larger city. He is filled with lots of common sense and while often the villagers give him a hard time ("He's too lazy," they claim.), they highly respet him and have come to his rescue more
than once.
He's not so lucky with his own love life, however, and seems to fall in love with any woman who shows interest. The real love, Priscilla Smythe-Halliburton, has moved to London, after he had broken off the engagement, and appears intermittently in all the books of the series.
In "Death of a Scriptwriter," a television crew appears in Macbeth's bailiwick to film a novel written by an English spinster who has moved to Lochdubh. Her books were never much of a success, but this one was picked up by the BBC. She is delighted that at long last, fame is coming her way. She is so overjoyed that she fails to retain the complete rights to her book; a screen writer is hired to "modernize" the plot and characters (in other words, to add lots of sex and violence to the rather staid Victorian tale).
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Love the twists and turns and you feel you know the characters - better than the TV series and I thought that was good. Love Agatha Raisin too can't wait to read the next one. Just when you think you have it sussed something else happens
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Revenge is a dish .... and here it is chilled to perfection. If, like me, you love the wit and wisdom of MC Beaton and were surprised, to say the least, at how little the TV series reflected the books, then this mid-late story in the canon is a treat. What would happen if a mystery writer encountered a TV production unit filming her books in the highlands of Scotland. And found the characters, plots and settings changed with little respect for the original novels... the answer lies here, seasoned with some delicious in-jokes, so deftly placed that if you never noticed them, you'd not feel left out. There's even a double-take with an ironic nod to Dorothy L Sayers. Apart form this, you'll find Hamish and his neighbours on good form as ever, the usual nemeses take a turn on the stage, and the writing just what we want.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a very easy relaxing read where we find Hamish trying to investigate the death of the scriptwriter who was a nasty piece of goods who thought he was the king of the castle. All the usual antics of the film industry takes place and becomes more theatrical than the film they are making. Hamish also misses Priscilla with whom he often discusses his cases with for ideas.

A very good book. Would recommend.
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By Elaine Tomasso TOP 500 REVIEWER on 13 Jan. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I find this series a good read. The characterisation is good with a lot of sly humour and there are enough plot twists to keep me guessing. I also like the way all loose ends are tied up as it makes for a satisfying read. It's well worth a read.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A lovely Hamish Macbeth tale, they all make me want to be up in the highlands. Nice gentle stories, often with a twist, nothing too horrid with good characters and descriptions. Have read them all, now have to re read them as I can't find anything similar.
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By lawyeraau HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 8 Mar. 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
From the moment that a group of filmmakers arrive in a town near the village Lochdubh in northern Scotland, Constable Hamish Macbeth has his hands full. The filmmakers are there to film a television series based upon some genteel cozy mysteries. The author's work, however, has undergone a complete revamp at the hands of a completely odious scriptwriter, who has changed the author's work into an unrecognizable sexual romp.

It appears that the aging author, in her initial delight at having her cozy mysteries being singled to be televised, did not read the fine print of her contract. Needless to say, the author is outraged at this travesty and is without recourse, having to grin and bear it. After all, she did sign a binding contract giving the filmmakers the right to make any changes in her work they see fit. Moreover, to add fuel to the fire, it appears that the local yokels have become star struck and are acting somewhat foolishly.

As dead bodies start to pile up, the author, villagers, cast, and crew get a thorough going over by Hamish. There are many twists and turns in this book, as any number of the characters in the book have had some sort of axe to grind with the dead. As always, the journey to discover just who the murderer is is great fun. The book is peppered with sly humor, some dotty villagers, and enjoyable characters. Those characters who are bumped off are usually quite unlikable, leaving the reader with no regrets about their departure. In this fourteenth book of the Hamish Macbeth series of cozy mysteries, the author does not disappoint.

As with all cozy mysteries, it is not so much the mystery that is of import but the characters that revolve around the mystery.
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