Buy Used
£2.80
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Tree Savers
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: A used book that is in good, clean condition. Your item will be picked, packed and posted FREE to you within the UK by Amazon, also eligible for super saver delivery.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Death is Forever (James Bond) Paperback – 15 Jul 1993

4.1 out of 5 stars 36 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 15 Jul 1993
£5,370.89 £0.01
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Coronet; New edition edition (15 July 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0340580968
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340580967
  • Product Dimensions: 11.2 x 16.9 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,475,659 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Book Description

A series of official, original Bond books written by the acclaimed thriller writer, John Gardner. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

John Gardner was educated in Berkshire and at St John's College, Cambridge. He has had many fascinating occupations and was, variously, a Royal Marine officer, a stage magician, theatre critic, reviewer and journalist. As well as his James Bond novels, Gardner's other fiction includes the acclaimed Herbie Kruger novels.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The 1980s Bond novels had seen the steady thawing of the Cold War and the disappearance of the Fleming plot gambit of 007 playing cat and mouse with a major supervillain. With the brick dust flying in Berlin, and the writer himself off to live in the USA, a palpable turning point was reached in the books both in narrative and context that would launch Gardner's Bond in a completely new direction for the 90s.

Score: 8/10. Bond returns to the Royal Navy for a joint UK, USA and USSR war game marking the USSR's "perestroika" (economic restructuring) and "glasnost" (cultural and political openness) policies. A new terrorist group BAST (Brotherhood of Anarchy & Secret Terror) has threatened to wreak havoc. But whom can 007 trust? Beautiful WREN officer Clover Pennington? Italian sex bomb Beatrice? Or enigmatic Russian Naval Attache Nicki?

It's a radical departure and takes a little getting used to, but it's a resounding success. The techno-thriller style (more Frederick Forsyth than Tom Clancy) really suits Gardner's knack with action and technical detail. The first few chapters alone are packed with exciting and immersive set pieces- you feel you could probably fly a sea harrier! Unlike other breaks from the format Bond remains at the forefront of the action, while intercutting the villains' machinations sets up the next threat without slowing things down. With SPECTRE dead and gone, the author anticipates the risk of BAST becoming a pale imitation: even Bond notes "it sounds like a poor man's SPECTRE." Although we don't get the meticulous background we got from Fleming (or Benson's Union Trilogy), there's a delightfully cynical reason for BAST's hollow heart.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Along with Role of Honour, Scorpius has to be the worst Gardner Bond I've read. Parts of the plot lifted from OHMSS, but with a cowardly villain at its centre. Bond just stumbles along but this time has an SAS type sidekick named Pearly who is dull as Bond became under Gardner's watch. The Bond-girl in this spends most of her time trying her best to get Bond to knob her, while snuggling up to him and spouting dialogue like this, "Just make love to me now, my dear. That's the best tonic"!

I love Bond but this one is truly awful. If you haven't read any Gardner but are thinking about it, start with For Special Services as at least that has some laugh out loud Bond moments.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Critics who'd mauled Fleming in the 60s spent the 80s complaining that Gardner wasn't him: they praised his 'straight' spy fiction, but merely acknowledged the bestselling success of his Bond novels. In the 90s this had waned, with less publicity accompanying the release of each book and reviewers often not bothering. Gardner himself endured serious illness, while 1991's left field The Man from Barbarossa (James Bond) had been unpopular both with public and publishers. How brilliant then that such a strong contender for his best Bond should follow.

Score: 9/10. Bond and partner of the week, CIA agent, Elizabeth 'Easy' StJohn (don't ask) fly off to investigate/ rescue the surviving members of Cabal: once the western intelligence commmunity's most successful network, its members are dying. It's a very Gardner set up, almost a rerun of No Deals, Mr. Bond (James Bond) but even faster. Even the 'death' themed chapters (contrived but fun) and Diamonds Are Forever quote/title aims to please fans. Conscious decision or not (to return to a winning formula) it works. Like No Deals and Scorpius (James Bond) it resembles an old fashioned spy caper or Hitchcock cold war thriller. Nearly every scene ends in a twist or showdown. It imbues 007 with all the spyworld tradecraft Gardner loved, while using the agents and agencies (as Fleming did) as players in an international game of cloak & dagger/ cowboys & indians.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Scorpius is an interesting take on the James Bond novel. There are aspects that feel Fleming-esque, but on the whole it feels neither like something crafted by the character's creator, nor like the previous novels written by John Gardner. It's lost a lot of the more eighties aspects, and feels quite trimmed back and without extravagance.

The book is more of a secret-agent procedural novel, with a little bit of character towards the end that doesn't get followed up properly in this novel - but perhaps Gardner is taking a leaf from Fleming's book and leaving the repercussions to the next book in the series.

The plot itself feels filled with coincidence - Bond just tumbles into events by accident rather than actually going on a mission, and seems a fairly useless agent for a lot of the time. Overall, the whole novel feels like it could have been about any secret agent - it's missing the ingredient that means it could only be about James Bond.

I remember having this book as a teenager - I don't know whether I didn't read it or just completely forgot the plot, but I suspect that if you ask me again in another ten years I will have forgotten again.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback