FREE Delivery in the UK.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we dispatch the item.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Death in Ancient Rome has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Nearfine
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Looks unread! Expect delivery in 20 days.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Death in Ancient Rome Hardcover – 4 May 2007

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£25.00
£25.00 £14.83
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£25.00 FREE Delivery in the UK. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we dispatch the item. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (4 May 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300112084
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300112085
  • Product Dimensions: 16.7 x 3.2 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,388,532 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"This arc from early to imperial Rome provides the organising principle for Catherine Edward's excellent book, which takes death and the representation of death as lenses through which to highlight some of the most striking characteristics of Roman culture. In anlaysing the ancient treatment of death, she shows that it is not only inextricable from other aspects of that culture-military, aesthetic,philosophical, political-but also informed by the persistent idea of dying with (or for) an audience." -- London Review of Books, November 15, 2007

'... a surprisingly engaging and immensely enthralling book, and... what will be the standard overview of the topic for many years to come.'
-- Robert Tatam, Journal of Classics Teaching, Summer 2008

'Death in Ancient Rome is readable, accessible, and scholarly, and a welcome contribution to the literature on an issue which the Romans found as fascinating as we do.' -- History Today, September 2007

Catharine Edwards has sifted the works of Cicero, Virgil, Tacitus
and more to show, fascinatingly, just how significant quitting the world
was both for those leaving and as an example to those left behind. -- The First Post, July 10, 2007

[an] engrossing study of Roman attitudes to death...What this
elegant book teaches us above all else is that the struggle to exert some
modicum of control over our own deaths is certainly not a new obsession. -- The Sunday Telegraph, July 15, 2007

Book Description

'... a surprisingly engaging and immensely enthralling book, and... what will be the standard overview of the topic for many years to come.'

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
For Romans, the moment of one's death was as, or even more, crucial than one's manner of living. In this elegant and perceptive book, Edwards traces death through the republican and imperial periods, and draws her evidence from a range of sources, literary as well as historical.

This is, as expected from a University of London Classics professor, an erudite book which assumes a fairly sophisticated knowledge of Roman cultures, and at least a passing acquaintance with its histories and literature.

The book doesn't, perhaps, tell us anything provocatively new, but it is a superb overview of the myriad ways in which Romans (and some culturally significant non-Romans: Cleopatra, Dido) controlled their future reputations through the manner and spectacle of their death.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Catharine Edwards has written a book that can be enjoyed and profited from at many levels. I read it end to end, but I will be encouraging my students studying the role of Gladiatorial combat in Rome to read that chapter, those studying Gender to look at discussions of how male and female deaths exhibiting virtus are differently gendered (especially discussion of a man's mind vir animus in a woman's body).

The book's focus on death does not in any way preclude reading it instead for martyrdom, maiestas and resistance (a particularly good chapter), or Gladiatorial symbolisms, but a full reading brings out some fascinating parallels between them.

As the blurb mentions, mortality is an inevitability we all face and in a society troubled by issues such as assisted dying or the ethics of violence some of what the ancient writers had to say may well resonate with the modern reader rather more than the hang-on-to-life-at-all-costs-no-matter-the-suffering ethics advocated by some of our (post?) Christian ethics. I certainly wouldn't say that this is the book to answer such issues (hardly its point), but it makes some interesting suggestions for further reading in the voluminous writings of (not only, but especially) Seneca and Cicero, which I for one will follow up.

There are some odd quirks to the book: every Latin quote is provided in the original and in translation, whilst the Greek only in translation and I cannot think of a rationale for this (if the original is important, it is important), unless it be that Latin is more widely known, but the nature of Edwards likely audience makes this less than certain.

I feel I have profited from its insight into the political realm of senatorial resistance and enjoyed other aspects as well as being prompted to read further into some of the ancient Latin philosophy, and I would recommend this book.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback