Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £4.99

Save £5.00 (50%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deadhouse Gates: (Malazan Book Of Fallen 2) (The Malazan Book Of The Fallen) by [Erikson, Steven]
Kindle App Ad

Deadhouse Gates: (Malazan Book Of Fallen 2) (The Malazan Book Of The Fallen) Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 129 customer reviews
Book 2 of 10 in The Malazan Book of the Fallen (10 Book Series)
See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£4.99

Kindle Unlimited
New in Kindle Unlimited
Browse the newest selection added to Kindle Unlimited, including titles from Mark Roberts, Robert B. Parker and Christobel Kent. With Kindle Unlimited, enjoy unlimited access to over 1 million titles and thousands of audiobooks on any device for £7.99 a month. Learn more

Get a £1 credit for movies or TV
Enjoy £1.00 credit to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle Book from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle Books) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 credit per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 on Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Terms and conditions apply

Product Description

Review

One of the best fantasy novels of the year.


One of the best fantasy novels of the year.
 

One of the best fantasy novels of the year.

Reminiscent of Tolkein''s scope, Zelazny''s cleverness and wit, and Donaldson''s brooding atmospherics. -- Michael A. Stackpole (07/17/2005)

Reminiscent of Tolkein's scope, Zelazny's cleverness and wit, and Donaldson's brooding atmospherics.
--Michael A. Stackpole

Gripping, fast-moving, delightfully dark, with a masterful and unapologetic brutality reminiscent of George R. R. Martin... Utterly engrossing.
--Elizabeth Haydon

"Give me the evocation of a rich, complex and yet ultimately unknowable other world, with a compelling suggestion of intricate history and mythology and lore. Give me mystery amid the grand narrative. Give me a world in which every sea hides a crumbled Atlantis, every ruin has a tale to tell, every mattock blade is a silent legacy of struggles unknown. Give me, in other words, the fantasy work of Steven Erikson. Erikson is a master of lost and forgotten epochs, a weaver of ancient epics on a scale that would approach absurdity if it wasn't so much fun."--Andrew Leonard, Salon.com on "The Malazan Book of the Fallen"
"Steven Erikson afflicts me with awe. Vast in scope, almost frighteningly fecund in imagination, and rich in sympathy, his work does something that only the rarest of books can manage: it alters the reader's perceptions of reality."--Stephen R. Donaldson on "Deadhouse Gates"
"I stand slack-jawed in awe of The Malazan Book of the Fallen. This masterwork of imagination may be the high water mark of epic fantasy. This marathon of ambition has a depth and breadth and sense of vast reaches of inimical time unlike anything else available today. The Black Company, Zelazny's Amber, Vance's Dying Earth, and other mighty drumbeats are but foreshadowings of this dark dragon's hoard."--Glen Cook on "The Malazan Book of the Fallen"
"One of the best fantasy novels of the year."--SF Site on "Deadhouse Gates"
"Rare is the writer who so fluidly combines a sense of mythic power and depth of world, with fully realized characters and thrilling action, but Steven Erikson manages it spectacularly. The books are reminiscent of Tolkein's scope, Zelazny's cleverness and wit, and Donaldson's brooding atmospherics; yet all combined with dazzling talent into a narrative flow that keeps the reader turning pages. Some writers open windows on worlds, Erikson opens worlds and makes them so real, so magical, you're not sure if you can escape-and I don't want to."-Michael A. Stackpole on "Deadhouse Gates"
"Such is the impact of the first book in Erikson's monumental Malazan saga, "Gardens of the Moon," that the achievement of this sequel is doubly surprising. Not only is the vigour and sweep of the earlier book effortlessly captured, the complex plot is simultaneously deepened and accelerated, with a grasp of tempo that has the reader inexorably gripped . . . Roll on, book three!"-"The Good Book Guide" on "Deadhouse Gates"
""
"""Gripping, fast-moving, delightfully dark, with a masterful and unapologetic brutality reminiscent of George R. R. Martin. Steven Erikson brings a punchy, mesmerizing writing style into the genre of epic fantasy, making an indelible impression. Utterly engrossing."--Elizabeth Haydon on "Deadhouse Gates"


Rich, complex...Erikson is a master of lost and forgotten epochs.
--Andrew Leonard "Salon "

Vast in scope, almost frighteningly fecund in imagination, and rich in sympathy.

--Stephen R. Donaldson

This masterwork of imagination may be the high water mark of epic fantasy.
--Glen Cook

Give me the evocation of a rich, complex and yet ultimately unknowable other world, with a compelling suggestion of intricate history and mythology and lore. Give me mystery amid the grand narrative. Give me a world in which every sea hides a crumbled Atlantis, every ruin has a tale to tell, every mattock blade is a silent legacy of struggles unknown. Give me, in other words, the fantasy work of Steven Erikson. Erikson is a master of lost and forgotten epochs, a weaver of ancient epics on a scale that would approach absurdity if it wasn't so much fun. "Andrew Leonard, Salon.com on The Malazan Book of the Fallen"

Steven Erikson afflicts me with awe. Vast in scope, almost frighteningly fecund in imagination, and rich in sympathy, his work does something that only the rarest of books can manage: it alters the reader's perceptions of reality. "Stephen R. Donaldson on Deadhouse Gates"

I stand slack-jawed in awe of The Malazan Book of the Fallen. This masterwork of imagination may be the high water mark of epic fantasy. This marathon of ambition has a depth and breadth and sense of vast reaches of inimical time unlike anything else available today. The Black Company, Zelazny's Amber, Vance's Dying Earth, and other mighty drumbeats are but foreshadowings of this dark dragon's hoard. "Glen Cook on The Malazan Book of the Fallen"

One of the best fantasy novels of the year. "SF Site on Deadhouse Gates"

Rare is the writer who so fluidly combines a sense of mythic power and depth of world, with fully realized characters and thrilling action, but Steven Erikson manages it spectacularly. The books are reminiscent of Tolkein's scope, Zelazny's cleverness and wit, and Donaldson's brooding atmospherics; yet all combined with dazzling talent into a narrative flow that keeps the reader turning pages. Some writers open windows on worlds, Erikson opens worlds and makes them so real, so magical, you're not sure if you can escape-and I don't want to. "Michael A. Stackpole on Deadhouse Gates"

Such is the impact of the first book in Erikson's monumental Malazan saga, "Gardens of the Moon," that the achievement of this sequel is doubly surprising. Not only is the vigour and sweep of the earlier book effortlessly captured, the complex plot is simultaneously deepened and accelerated, with a grasp of tempo that has the reader inexorably gripped . . . Roll on, book three! "The Good Book Guide on Deadhouse Gates"

Gripping, fast-moving, delightfully dark, with a masterful and unapologetic brutality reminiscent of George R. R. Martin. Steven Erikson brings a punchy, mesmerizing writing style into the genre of epic fantasy, making an indelible impression. Utterly engrossing. "Elizabeth Haydon on Deadhouse Gates""

Book Description

The second book in Steven Erikson's thrilling epic fantasy series chronicling the ill-fated Malazan Empire.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3969 KB
  • Print Length: 868 pages
  • Publisher: Transworld Digital; New Ed edition (15 July 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0031RS6PU
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 129 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #7,760 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book is intimidatingly massive (900 pages), requires about three times the amount of thinking required by normal ficition to fully digest its contents. It's also unrelentingly bleak, tragic and violent. But apart from that, it's a walk in the park!

A huge part of me wants to criticise this book and, indeed, the whole 'The Malazan Book of the Fallen' series. But, I have to be honest, this is mainly because this series has stretched me beyond any other literature I've ever read and I resent the fact that I'm not quite clever, patient or perceptive to grasp these books on one reading. I have to be objective and, objectively, this book is a masterpiece!

The illusion of realism that Erikson creates is second to none. He never interrupts the writing with cliched exposition and so the reader feels like a humble fly on the wall and not an intruder. Of course, this means the reader has actually got to think, to read between the lines and bare a certain amount of uncertainty but, if you are willing to take on this challenge, the rewards are great.

Also, the book is so crammed with detail, it's very very re-readable. It'll take a lifetime to figure out. Go on, take the plunge - it's deep water but there are pearls on the ocean bed!
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Another epic escapade into the world of the Fallen.

This is no Tolkien vision of sweeping glades and smiling elder faces, this is a brooding, brutal and ultimately savage work of fantasy. Really, you can't help but love it.

The question that seems to lie at the heart of so many of the characters is: 'What is preferable, to fall so far that no remnants of your other self are left or to have died innocent, unfallen.'

Battles are fought, wars are waged, yet no distinction is made between the foes. Both are fighting for noble values, both are "good" and yet both have the capacity for evil. Something I've never come across in a fantasy novel before & depending upon your take on originality, a brilliant concept.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A. Whitehead TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 Feb. 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The first book in this series, Gardens of the Moon, was a gloriously complex, action-packed romp of a novel, with a huge cast of entertaining, well-drawn characters and an absolute refusal to bown down to genre cliches or expectations. Book 2, Deadhouse Gates, continues many of these ideals in an admirable fashion. We're wrenched halfway around the world to the continent of Seven Cities, which is about to rise up against the Malazan Empire. A totally new cast is introduced, although a few minor players from Book 1 soon arrive to provide a bridge to the first book. There are three main plots developing in tandem: Felisin Paran's escape from slavery, General Coltaine's epic march across the continent and a plot to assassinate the Malazan Empress. The Coltaine storyline is the heart of the novel and is truly horrific at times, and the conclusion is truly gut-wrenching (the reader is as angry as the characters are at the heartless betrayal that ends the novel, and the poetic justice which rewards it is sweet). Deadhouse Gates is much darker and even more complex than the first book. It reads well as a stand-alone novel, though I recommend you read the first one as it's a slightly gentler introduction to the world. Book 2 is also clever in that many events take place simultaneously with Book 3, providing a link to that novel. Superb.
2 Comments 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I started this book with some trepidation, as I wasn't particularly impressed with Gardens of the Moon, but as many reviews on here suggested the series improved as it went on I thought I would persevere.

Well, it's too early to speak to for the series as a whole, but I'm definitely glad I carried on and read Deadhouse Gates.

To start with, I thought my fears would be well founded, as the book is set on another continent, and introduces yet more characters, races and concepts. However, where GotM seemed to throw new characters and plot points into the mix every few pages, this book feels more focused.

The plot revolves around the revolution known as "The Whirlwind" taking place in the Seven Cities, as they rise up against the Malazan Empire. While there are still several interlinked stories going on against this background, the main thrust of the plot is the epic retreat of the Malazan armies and refugees led by the as-yet untried commander Coltaine.

This lends the book much more of a military and human feel than the previous book, with more focus on battles and tactics than on magic. This really felt like I was reading about an actual historical event, but without coming across dry in any way. And like a real event, the battles and the march are described with brutal and bloody realism, leading to a sickening but all too plausible conclusion.

When magic is used in this book, it seems to be done in a more "realistic" way than in the first. Perhaps this is because I am now more familiar with the concepts of the magic used in this series as more information is slowly dripped in by the author; I now have more understanding of what warrens, otataral and ascendants are!
Read more ›
2 Comments 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover