David Matthews: Symphonie... has been added to your Basket
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by rarerarerare
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: CD: Disc = very good. Artwork = very good.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

David Matthews: Symphonies Nos. 2 & 6 CD

4.4 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

Price: £12.81 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
13 new from £8.75 2 used from £8.99
£12.81 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • David Matthews: Symphonies Nos. 2 & 6
  • +
  • Matthews, D - Symphony Nos. 1, 3 & 5
  • +
  • David Matthews - Sym. No 4/Cantiga/Sept
Total price: £43.45
Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Orchestra: BBC National Orchestra of Wales
  • Conductor: Jac van Steen
  • Composer: David Matthews
  • Audio CD (15 Mar. 2010)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Dutton Epoch
  • ASIN: B003AR0R26
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 20,314 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

Dutton Epoch's second volume of David Matthews's symphonies presents the second and sixth, among the most engaging symphonies of our time. "A glorious sixth," said The Times after the Prom premiere in 2007, which all at Dutton Epoch can echo now that we have made its premiere recording. Incorporating Vaughan Williams's hymn tune Down Ampney, it continues the British tradition in memorable and lyrical style. As the Sunday Times critic wrote, "It is indubitably a work to listen to again." It is coupled with the involving Second Symphony, a large-scale single movement whose lyricism - a critic commented on "a finely wrought melody for bassoon which is also its most personal and memorable invention" - contrasts with the exciting writing for percussion in an exuberant central episode. Track listing: Symphony No.2, Op.1 (1976-79) i. Lento e calmo - ii. Allegro energico - iii. Più mosso - iv. Presto veloce Symphony No.6, Op.100 (2003-07) i. Flowing ii. Scherzo: Vivacissimo iii. Molto moderato - Adagio

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Verified Purchase
I only recently purchased this CD, but over the past year or so have had a very interesting dialogue by email with David Matthews, particularly concerning his 6th Symphony, which I first heard at the Proms a couple of years ago and which received marvellous reviews after the first performance, which I entirely echo. I even tried to persuade a number of British Record Companies to take an interest in recording this work and towards the end of last year he said it was going to be released in 2010. It has recently come out on the Dutton Label and the Conductor, Jac Van Steen, also introduced the work at the Prom. The performance and recording are both exemplary and I would strongly advise anyone having an interest in the British Symphonic tradition to purchase the CD. Incidentally, at the time I originally prepared my review, I had not listened to the recording of the 2nd Symphony which was not for me a familiar work. I have since done so and again this is a very good illustration of David Matthews' skills in producing cogent symphonic music, with memorable orchestration. I can only hope that his recently written 7th Symphony will be recorded soon, although he has told me that this is part of a long term project and that we may expect to hear that he has written an 8th and possibly also 9th Symphony. I will be badgering him to do so in the fullness of time!
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
At last it's getting possible to hear symphonies by David Matthews on disc in great performances. Whoever might think the symphony is dead - I don't but sometimes you'll hear this omen here and there - could take his symphonies as an example the symphony is still a living thing.
These performances are exemplary, although it's not possible to have a hearing of another interpreter-conductor but that's no problem. If you like Sibelius, Walton and the whole of the British mainstream symphonic tradition you'll find many pleasures in these works. Matthews' outings are tonal but moderately modern.
Dutton is doing a very fine job promoting David Matthews' case. Over here - The Netherlands - I'll never get an opportunity to hear these works live - they stick playing Brahms - so having this CD is a great thing. There'll hopefully followed by another fine disc the next year with the last of Matthew's unrecorded symphonies (4 and 7). The Welsh orchestra plays very good, recording has much depth and a fine bass and brass. Violins shine without becoming glassy. Excellent!
3 Comments 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Eugene Onegin TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 17 July 2013
Verified Purchase
I bought this CD on the strength of hearing the premiere of the Sixth Symphony at the Proms in 2007 when it struck me as one of the most sonically imaginative and attractive works of recent times. This recording has not changed my opinion of the work's value nor of my belief that this cycle of symphonies should be on any serious music lover's list of pieces to get to know. Matthews is a composer very keenly aware of his musical heritage and there are clear echoes of some musical greats of the past here not least Benjamin Britten. In the Sixth the stylistic and structural debt to Mahler are palpable and the theme on which the symphony is based is Vaughan Williams Down Ampney. Yet the music does, I would suggest reference an even wider musical culture with the fascinating conclusion to the first movement scored for bass flute, flugelhorn and cowbells which is redolent of late sixties progressive rock. Most importantly, the music positively invites your engagement and analysis, and if, like me, you like nothing better than to really get to grips with new music by listening closely to the orchestration and picking out the forms in the score then this CD is a treat. The Second I find just slightly less appealing despite some splendid writing for percussion. This is a work of wide dynamic contrasts evoking themes of innocence and rebirth (Mahler again)culminating in a kind of musical explosion a little reminiscent of Robert Simpson's marvelous symphonies. The recording itself is splendidly rich and detailed and the ensemble and solo playing need not fear comparison. Recommended.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
The twentieth century is justifiably regarded as the golden age of the British symphony. Elgar, even with only two completed symphonies to his name, was reckoned to be the pioneer (his predecessors, Parry and Stanford, both wrote in a European tongue), while Vaughan Williams, Bax, Rubbra, Arnold, Alwyn, Lloyd, Brian, Simpson, and others, all made the symphony the backbone of their output. David Matthews, having now reached No.7, has folllowed this venerable tradition. All but this most recent symphony have been recorded, and here on this Dutton disc, we have two contrasting symphonies from different periods in the composer's career.

Symphony No.2 is a comparatively early work (1976-79). It begins quietly with a bassoon figure on a bed of soft strings, a mood which is maintained for some time and refuses to be subdued by agitated interjections from the woodwind. Eventually, however, the music becomes more ominous with threatening crescendos from the lower strings, brass and percussion, which represents, according to the composer, the start of a journey from innocence to experience. The slow, grave tempo is maintained throughout until the "allegro energico" second section weighs in, although even here the strings tend to flow rather than rush along. Discordant interjections in the brass add a note of unease not present in the first section. From this point the music increases in tempo and dynamism as "experience" takes hold. The third section makes much use of pitched percussion, while the final one brings all the orchestral forces to bear, returning at last to the opening theme which is now, however, cast in a very different mood from that in which it began.

Symphony No.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Customer Discussions


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback