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The Daughters of Cain (Inspector Morse Series Book 11) by [Dexter, Colin]
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The Daughters of Cain (Inspector Morse Series Book 11) Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews

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Product Description

Book Description

‘This is Colin Dexter at his most excitingly devious’ Daily Telegraph

Book Description

‘Bizarre and bewildering – that’s what so many murder investigations in the past had proved to be … In this respect, at least, Lewis was correct in his thinking. What he could not have known was what unprecedented anguish the present case would cause to Morse’s soul.’ Chief Superintendent Strange’s opinion was that too little progress had been made since the discovery of a corpse in a North Oxford flat. The victim had been killed by a single stab wound to the stomach. Yet the police had now weapon, no suspect, no motive. Within days of taking over the case Chief Inspector Morse and Sergeant Lewis uncover startling new information about the life and death of Dr Felix McClure. When another body is discovered Morse suddenly finds himself with rather too many suspects. For once, he can see no solution. But then he receives a letter containing a declaration of love…

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1082 KB
  • Print Length: 324 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0804113645
  • Publisher: Pan; New Edition edition (4 Sept. 2008)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003GK21RQ
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #52,276 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is a superb novel from Colin Dexter. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it and I thoroughly recommend it. The relationship between Morse and Lewis sparkles in this novel and the plot is so gripping I read this book in a day on holiday. The plot revolves around three women ('The Daughters of Cain') who are connected to each other through their loathing of one man.
Morse first investigates the murder of Dr Felix McClure and Morse and Lewis have an immediate suspect. Morse becomes romantically involved with a young woman who may be connected with the murder of the second victim. This book is vintage Dexter and is very easy to read. The plot grips you and there are some good twists near the end of the novel. The Daughters of Cain is one of the best Morse novels and the subplots and suspense keep you reading right to the end.
Excellent stuff
5 stars
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By C. FULLER TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 17 Sept. 2013
Format: Paperback
There is so much more within this book than ever appeared in the television series. I watched and enjoyed every story with John Thaw as Morse but was amazed at how much I learnt about his characters from each story I have read. I also found each chapter very easy to read and follow and if I did not know what the references were I looked them up so I learnt lots of things from this story.
I have read many detective stories and often there is too much technical detail and you almost feel as if you are reading a users manual. I never get this feeling with a Colin Dexter story but what I do get is great entertainment and I find I cannot put the book down unlike others.
I am looking forward to my next Colin Dexter already and know I will enjoy the characters he brings to life and the settings he uses within Oxford.
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By A Customer on 1 Mar. 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am new to reading full length novels (i'm only 11) and i decided to start with this one. I can honestly say that this novels has inspired me to read. The plot is great, teh writing brilliant, the characters really interesting. I have no fault at all with this book. it is entirely thought provoking and you can totally understand the motives of the criminal(or criminals) and even feel a certain compassion for them, no you DO feel compassion for them. This book has shaped my future reading material. thank You Mr Dexter.
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Format: Paperback
One of the criticisms of Colin Dexter’s Inspector Morse series, written between 1975-99, is its rather stereotypical treatment of its female characters. This was never more justified than in ‘The Way Through the Woods’, 1993. In his next book from 1994, Dexter placed three remarkable women, each quite remarkable but very different, at its centre. In addition he introduces Morse and Lewis early on, rather than making the reader wait for their appearance.

The women are each very different - Julia Stevens is a rather disillusioned secondary school teacher; Brenda Brooks, her cleaning lady, is in an abusive relationship with her husband, Ted, a cleaner at an Oxford college, whilst the third woman, Ellie Smith, is much younger and working as a prostitute when the reader first meets her.

The violent event that opens the book is the stabbing of an Ancient History don, Dr Felix McClure, whose limited reputation was based on his book ‘The Great Plague at Athens: Its Effect on the Course and Conduct of the Peloponnesian War’ [‘A long title. A long work.’]

The untimely death of a colleague’s wife brings Morse and Lewis into this investigation and they quickly link McClure to the suicide of a student, drug-taking and the departure of Ted Brooks from the college. As is typical of Dexter’s books, Morse sets up a series of hypotheses that come crashing down when further evidence is found, often by the hardworking Lewis. Gradually the links between the three women emerge but then Ted Brooks disappears.
Read more ›
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Dexter's Morse has grown and developed into an utterly compelling character. Reading about him, his thought processes and interaction with the world and people around him, is as much a reason to buy these books as the criminal plot lines themselves. It just so happens this story with its principle triumvirate female cast is a belter. With only two books left in the series I am saddened as this wonderful set of books draw to a close.
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Format: Paperback
The Daughters of Cain has always retained a soft spot in my heart - I read it when I was about 12, it was the first "adult" book I read, and the first mystery novel. Coming back to it 17 years later, I was slightly nervous I wouldn't like it so much for some reason (I'm making my way through all the Morse novels, tripping through them with glee). I needn't have worried - even on second reading this is one of my very favourites of the series. Whilst there are elements of the plot that are convoluted, they are convoluted in a more simple way than in some Morse novels, and Dexter spends a bit more time on the psychologies of his major characters - Brenda Brooks, Julia Stevens, and Ellie Smith. To be honest, that's what I remember liking so much the first time around, that holy trinity of women who make up the main cast. And I liked it just as much the second time around. The whole novel is a rounded and satisfying portrait of various types of justice. Wonderful. Colin Dexter's style is one of the most enjoyable I've ever had the pleasure to read, and re-reading them all has been a revelatory experience - somehow, I had forgotten!
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