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Daughters Of Arabia: Princess 2 Paperback – 1 Oct 2004

4.4 out of 5 stars 103 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam; New Ed edition (1 Oct. 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553816934
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553816938
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 2 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (103 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 88,862 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Women with everything but freedom... gripping revelations" (Daily Mail)

"Brutality hidden behind the veil... more horrific stories" (Sunday Express)

"If it didn't come from within palace walls, no one would believe it... Sad, funny, and gripping" (Daily Mail)

"Sasson's sequel is yet another page-turner... An eye-opening account" (Publishers Weekly)

Book Description

Reissue of the sequel to the massive worldwide bestseller Princess

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 20 Jan. 2003
Format: Hardcover
I read Princess and was amazed at the way the Royal family of Saudi Arabia treats its women. Daughters of Arabia is continuation of Princess and enlightens readers about the 2nd generation of the Royal family who have benefited from the oil wealth of there ancestors
It is amazing how the constraints of the Muslim word effect the young and venerable Muslim girls. It is an amazing account of two sisters who are so unlike but from the same mother.
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Format: Paperback
It seems hard to believe that such things as are described in this book actually go on. I haven't read either "Princess" or "Desert Royal" but I shall. I can't decide what I think of the two main men in her life - her husband and father. Certainly with most of the other men mentioned the reader does not have this problem. I liked the way the book was written. I think its good that it was written in a lively way. I would certainly recommend this book, and I feel very glad to live in England.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
According to this princess the men of this country have a ghastly attitude towards their women. Somehow, over time, the men have subjugated their women to the extent that they have absolutely no freedom at all. Kept behind doors, totally covered up in the presence of other men and allowing them no say at all, even making divorce easy for themselves though not for their wives. Religion is quoted as the reason that women should not be given freedom as they would all become wanton prostitutes. Such hypocrisy! Many of these men flout their religion and laws, especially those rich enough to buy their way out of trouble. Even the male moral police go around dispensing justice (!) to any woman found not covered up and even talking to a male non-relative.
What are these men so scared of? The over-riding disgusting memory of this book is their attitude to sex, they seem to be driven by lust even involving very young girls. I think an up-tight so-called religious society would produce this. This princess appears to be reasonably lucky with her husband - be nice if she could also highlight the misery of their many servants.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having read 'Princess', I doubted whether this book would be its equal. After reading it, 'couldn't put it down' I have immediately ordered the 3rd book. Highly recommend. What I can't understand in the book is the fact that Sultana mentioned the consumption of alcohol by her and other members of the Royal Family. I was under the impression as she is a Muslim, that alcohol is forbidden??
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Format: Paperback
Still a good continuation and interesting to learn about the princess's daughters. This book was very short and the stories were an extenion of what went on in the first book. The story was generally based on the prnicess's daughters and thier characters and personalities. How they develop and become different people. One is quite similar to her mother and the other takes after her aunty. It nice to see how the daughters develop into adults after reading about thier mother developing from a child into an adult.

The mother herself changes and swings from one mood to the next and the effect is shown on her as the books pogress and she realises what her weaknesses and tries to deal with them as best she can.

The daughters themselves have an easier life then their mother and one daughter Maha takes this for granted. It was nice to see the love Amani has for animals and the effect shown on her and how she learns to deals with things when she finds her uncles birds are in danger and kept in poor conditions. Also the feelings Maha develops when she witnesses her uncles Herem and the women he is holding there brings an intense and agressive side to Maha who tries her best to help these women out of the place. She is hurt to realise that things like that can happen in Saudia Arabia and in the Royal family. She with her mother try their best to get them out, but are not sucessful and give up.

However, if you take this as a update then you dont be diappointed. If read this thinking you a reading another side to the story or a different theme altogethrethen you may be diappointed.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
H I have read 1,000's of books mainly true stories and these are by far the best read of a very brave princess to divulge to the rest of the world of tragedies in her country. Amongst the the ridiculously wealthy these books bring home that money can't buy you everything! I applaud "princess sultana" what a woman! One I would like to meet! Make sure you buy them all and read them from the first book. Amazing!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Really enlightening read as are the other 2 books in the series. Non judgemental of other cultures and beliefs but this gives you a very good understanding of what women have to deal with in other parts of the world and society. Once I started reading this I couldn't actually put it down, very well written and a complete eye opener.

Would love to read and find out more
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Princess Sultana's Daughters," the sequel to "Princess," uses the princess's daughters to mirror the great gaps that exist in Saudi society between those who wish to keep the country in the 6th century and those who want to bring it into the 21st. Unfortunately, the religious fanatics, symbolized by the ever-present "mutawain" (religious police)are determined to keep the people backward, uneducated, and living in fear.By their public beatings, canings, beheadings, and other tortures, the powerful "mutawain" serve to subjugate the public. Their violations of human rights inspire fear and keep the educated moderates from speaking out. Those who do speak out, even children, end up as prisoners in Saudi jails, are executed, subject to torture, banned, fired from their jobs--all for trying to exercise a freedom that we take for granted--the freedom of speech. Even Americans working in the Kingdom are not exempt from the mutawain's abuses; a few years back they broke up a children's Christmas party at an American school, smashing furniture, destroying the stage, and terrorizing the children. Ms. Sasson speaks from first-hand observation, having lived in Saudi Arabia for over ten years. While there, she befriended many Saudi women, among them Princess Sultana; for obvious reasons of personal safety, the Princess and the other women Jean writes about had to retain their anonymity. I know from personal experience the abuses that Saudi men are able to heap upon their wives and daughters--all in the name of religion--which most of these men misinterpret.Read more ›
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