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Daughter of the East Paperback – 1 Jun 1989

4.0 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Paperback, 1 Jun 1989
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Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Mandarin; Reprint edition (1 Jun. 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0749300752
  • ISBN-13: 978-0749300753
  • Product Dimensions: 17.3 x 10.9 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,351,473 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Benazir Bhutto served twice as Pakistan's Prime Minister, from 1988 to 1990 and 1993 to 1996. She is now based in Dubai, from where she makes regular trips around the world giving lectures. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a real life account of struggle of a woman who fought with one of the worst despotic regimes in the world and she succeeded in this fight with the help of poor, barefoot, but determined, committed people of Pakistan. This success did not come easy but at the cost of the lives of her father, brother and thousands of her young party workers.

Her upbringing of not less than of any princess and her account of later years in Sukkur jail makes one feel bad about the whole system of Pakistan. Where it has become a fashion for army generals to overthrow civilian governments after every ten years. Sometimes getting the elected Prime Ministers killed by judiciary and sometimes by exiling them.

2007 edition of this book has an additional chapter of 39 pages. This chapter really stands out from the book not because of anything new are amazing in it, but because this chapter is targeted to different readers from the rest of book's readers. To further simplify it, the first edition was for all those peace loving people of world who want the political culture of democracy to flourish in third world countries, whereas the last chapter is targeted to all those governments who somehow want to get rid of (so called, Islamic) extremists from muslim countries specially Afghanistan and Pakistan and can play any role in that. The last chapter has some very good observations about the short sightedness of some army generals in Pakistan specially Musharaf, who in the past thought it is easy to conquer Srinagar and did ventures like Kargil but now he believes it is better to demilitarise Kashmir.

This book ends on the quote of Martin Luther King "Our lives begin to end the day we remain silent on things that matter".
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Format: Paperback
Benazir Bhutto's Daughter of the East is a factual, honest biography totally lacking self pity and self indulgence. Despite having been born into one of Pakistan's richest land owning families, Benazir Bhutto had a difficult life spending numerous years in prison, under house arrest and in solitary confinement under General Zia Ul Huq's military regime. After the hanging of her father, Prime Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto in 1979, the Bhutto clan were spared no mercy by General Zia. Out of the four Bhutto children, Benazir stayed in Pakistan and her resilience, strength and religious faith come to the fore in this autobiography. The Bhutto tenacity to hold on to her belief in a better Pakistan is tested to the limit during the Zia years from 1977 to 1988 when he died in a plane crash. It is Ms Bhutto's frank depiction of those years and the fight to restore democracy back to a Pakistan frightened into submission by a fundamentalist ruler who took over in a coup d'etat that paved the way for Benazir's final return from exile in Europe when in April 1986, one million people turned up in Lahore to meet the leader of the Pakistan People's Party who would lead the way for democracy and a legally elected Prime Minister after nearly ten years of martial rule.
There are times during this biography that one cannot believe the resolve of this woman and her amazing ability to endure the treatment meted out to her and her family by the regime. The depiction of the death of her brother in particular, is difficult to comprehend and it is one of the few times in her life that Benazir breaks down.
Daughter of the East is an honest, personable account of one woman's fight to preserve the honour of her family name and the work undertaken by her father.
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Format: Paperback
What an amazing woman who led an amazing life. I couldn't put this book down and it gave me an absolute understanding of the political environment in Pakistan as well as an understanding of reasons for international terrorism and how we have reached this age of terror. Truly essential reading for our time - Benazir's messages must live on....
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I wanted to learn more about Benizir Bhutto after her assasination and "Daughter of the East" just fell into my lap. Another reviewer has noted that the autobiography only focusses on a little part of Bhutto's life and political carreer - and I agree. However, I would like to promote "Daughter of the East" as mandatory reading for everyone.

Chronological "Daughter of the East" covers Zia's period in Pakistan from the late 1970s to 1988, but that statement does not begin to encompass the dimensions of "Daughter of the East". "Daughter of the East" is a personal account of Benizir Bhutto and her youth, 20s, and 30s. It is about being the eldest daughter of the prime minister, it is about being a woman and politically active in a predominately Islamic country, it is about political oppression, about democracy, about faith, freedom, and hope for the future. It is about torture and imprisonment, about human rights for every individual, and about ethics and the means to an end.

You really need to read this book.

Louise.
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You can't help reading this book and admiring Ms Bhutto, in many ways. Her charm and lovely nature shines through. Her life was incredibly difficult, and yet her positivity and warmth is present at all times. While reading the book, you can't help but feel the loss that her death was to this world.

Unfortunately the book is focused on one part of her life, which is when she was imprisoned, rather than her life as a whole. It also focuses on the politics rather than the woman. I would be interested to hear more about her personal and family life, and her thoughts and feelings about the world in general. Instead it focuses on the suffering she endured in Pakistan in the 70s and 80s. While this is interesting, inspiring and educational (particularly if you're interested in Pakistan's situation as it is now), I wouldn't call it a comprehensive autobiography of Ms Bhutto.
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