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Dark Tower: The Long Road Home (The Dark Tower) Paperback – 20 Oct 2010

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: MARVEL - US; 01 edition (20 Oct. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785127798
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785127796
  • Product Dimensions: 17.1 x 0.6 x 26 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 585,169 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Peter David is a prolific "New York Times "bestselling author whose career, and continued popularity, spans more than two decades. He has worked in every conceivable media television, film, books (fiction, nonfiction, and audio), short stories, and comic books and acquired loyal followings in all of them. In the literary field, he has had more than a hundred novels published. He lives in New York with his wife and four children.

Robin Furth was born and raised in Philadelphia and attended the University of Pennsylvania. While enrolled in the Ph.D. program at the University of Maine, she was introduced to Stephen King, who needed a research assistant. Her work with King as he completed the "Dark Tower" series produced the "Dark Tower Concordance". Furth has since written the story lines for Marvel s bestselling comic book spin-off series "The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Born". She divides her time among Maine, the south of England, and Mid-World.


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Top Customer Reviews

By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 25 Aug. 2011
Format: Paperback
"The Gunslinger Born" explored the origins and early struggles of young Roland Deschain, as well as the loss of his first true love, Susan Delgado.

And Stephen King's "Dark Tower: The Long Road Home" picks up right after that, showing us more devastating events that shaped Roland Deschain into the gunslinger anti-hero we know and love. While the first part is rather slow, it has plenty of horrific moments and the haunting quality of a "world that has moved on."

A devastated Roland takes down Susan's charred body, as Alain and Bert argue about whether they should be stopping. But suddenly Roland fires at Maerlyn's Grapefruit -- which suddenly turns into a tentacled eyeball that jumps on Roland's face, and enthralls his very soul before they can peel it off. His ka-tet is chased by a bunch of local thugs, the last Big Coffin Hunter, and a ghastly pack of mutated wolves.

Nearby, a mentally challenged boy named Sheemie was seen climbing into old war machines, only to encounter a strange robot that is somehow still "alive."And inside Maerlyn's Grapefruit, Roland is slowly being driven mad in his own memories -- right before being dragged to the hellish citadel of the Crimson King, who reveals a ghastly secret to the young boy from long ago, which will change him forever...

"The Dark Tower: Long Road Home" isn't quite as gripping as its predecessor, "The Gunslinger Born" -- partly because it's a briefer story, and partly because it's simpler. It's a tribute to Stephen King's original story -- and to the hauntingly vivid artwork -- that it's still such an intense rollercoaster ride.
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Brilliant
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning imagery, fantastic storyline, answers a few questions! 22 Mar. 2011
By H.0 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I was impressed. Thats pretty much it in a nutshell! Although I had Roland and his companions already invisioned in my imagination, its great to see anothers perspective on what the characters looked like. I was excited to see the fate of Roland and his ka-tet. I wont spoil the story line, but I can honestly say that I highly recommend this series.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A long road ahead 12 Oct. 2010
By EA Solinas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
"The Gunslinger Born" explored the origins and early struggles of young Roland Deschain, as well as the loss of his first true love, Susan Delgado.

And Stephen King's "Dark Tower: The Long Road Home" picks up right after that, showing us more devastating events that shaped Roland Deschain into the gunslinger anti-hero we know and love. While the first part is rather slow, it has plenty of horrific moments and the haunting quality of a "world that has moved on."

A devastated Roland takes down Susan's charred body, as Alain and Bert argue about whether they should be stopping. But suddenly Roland fires at Maerlyn's Grapefruit -- which suddenly turns into a tentacled eyeball that jumps on Roland's face, and enthralls his very soul before they can peel it off. His ka-tet is chased by a bunch of local thugs, the last Big Coffin Hunter, and a ghastly pack of mutated wolves.

Nearby, a mentally challenged boy named Sheemie was seen climbing into old war machines, only to encounter a strange robot that is somehow still "alive."And inside Maerlyn's Grapefruit, Roland is slowly being driven mad in his own memories -- right before being dragged to the hellish citadel of the Crimson King, who reveals a ghastly secret to the young boy from long ago, which will change him forever...

"The Dark Tower: Long Road Home" isn't quite as gripping as its predecessor, "The Gunslinger Born" -- partly because it's a briefer story, and partly because it's simpler. It's a tribute to Stephen King's original story -- and to the hauntingly vivid artwork -- that it's still such an intense rollercoaster ride.

After the heartbreaking first few pages, the plot speeds into a suitably confusing, desperate chase through a lonely wilderness, with plenty of gunshots and dying creatures. Things actually get rather gory as Roland's pals struggle over rickety bridges and across a red-tinged wilderness, since one of them almost gets his arm bitten off (and announces that he'd rather die than shoot left-handed forever. Hardcore, kid).

And since this is a world made by Stephen King, we have plenty of the eerie and the horrible -- Sheemie's confrontation with a baby-faced robot is just one example. King's rich, old-time narrative translates well into comic form, almost as if he were conversing with the readers ("But don't be laughing at Sheemie, I beg ya, because he's been through considerable trials").

And Jae Lee and Richard Isanove really bring this story to life -- they create a world split between bright bloody red mist and autumnal twilight, filled with shadowy faces, barren lands, and ghastly pursuers. And inside the Grapefruit, we get a full cornucopia of horrors, with Roland defiantly trying to keep his sanity and soul intact in a dusty, hazy landscape full of withered trees, tragic future selves, evil crows, lumpy castles, and the vaguely spidery King with his hellish magic and his suitably evil offers to Roland.

"The Gunslinger Born" introduced Roland as a boy, but "The Long Road Home" has undeniably made him a man. He has the guts and integrity to snarl not just at Marte but at the King himself. And after being in Roland's shadow for so long, Alain and Cuthbert also get to take center stage here -- we get to see just how strong and capable they are.

"Dark Tower: The Long Road Home" is not as tightly-written as its predecessor, but it's filled with a sense of overhanging horror and some solid action for the sidekicks. Definitely worth checking out.
4.0 out of 5 stars An Interesting Exploration of Roland's Youth 1 May 2012
By J. Hill - Published on Amazon.com
The Long Road Home is not too bad, although parts of it almost feel like fan fiction, as it occasionally strays far from anything Stephen King actually wrote in the Dark Tower books. Some of the changes are inspired by things King wrote, and all plot points are supposedly reviewed by King, but he's essentially giving others the go-ahead on certain ideas rather than actively engaging in the planning and writing. That's why this series doesn't always capture the voice of King's writing as well as its predecessor. The first series, The Gunslinger Born, was mostly an adaptation of the fourth Dark Tower book, Wizard and Glass, as well as parts of the first book, The Gunslinger, making it easy for the writers to stick to King's original material. Much of the action in this arc centers on events King only referred to in his books, such as Roland getting lost in Maerlyn's Grapefruit after leaving Mejis. His journey through the glass, coming face-to-face with the Crimson King, and realizing that he must embark on a quest for the Dark Tower are fully explored instead of mentioned in passing, as they are in Wizard and Glass. These are my favorite parts of The Long Road Home, as they seem the closest to what King might have actually written had they been in the novels. On the flipside, we get curious additions, like the ball turning into an eye-creature from the Prim and sucking Roland in by wrapping itself around his face. While this is inspired by Roland saying in Wizard and Glass that the ball was alive, King definitely never hinted that it transformed into a tentacled eye-creature. So, you take the good with the bad, and overall it turns out to be a worthwhile companion to the Dark Tower books. The artwork seals the deal, providing world-class illustrations of countless characters and scenes that have never been officially presented visually. In fact, I enjoy flipping through the pages and looking at the drawings as much as reading the book. The artists have done an amazing job matching King's descriptions and bringing Mid-World to life. While I don't consider all of the events that take place in this book to be official accounts of Roland's past, it does fill in a few holes with logical elaborations, and should be read, and the excellent artwork appreciated, by anyone who is a fan of The Dark Tower.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Can't read half of the pages 3 Jun. 2013
By Jason Tew - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The story is amazing but half of the pages won't zoom in and I can't read the text. I hope it's something that I can figure out. Otherwise I'm better off buying the stories in print.
4.0 out of 5 stars Somehow I knew they wouldn't stick to the original source... 9 Feb. 2011
By Robert Beveridge - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Peter David, The Dark Tower vol. 2: The Long Road Home (Marvel, 2008)

While I half-expected it would happen, I was still jolted when Peter David and his crew struck out on their own in the graphic novel adaptation of The Dark Tower. David assures us in the afterword that every last piece of plot and dialogue that wasn't in the original books passes before Stephen King's eyes, but let's face it, he greenlighted the film adaptation of Sleepwalkers. (And I say this as a diehard fan of both Madchen Amick and Ron Perlman.) And after the setup in the first book, which cleaved to the original source material like a lost angel to Tammy Faye Bakker's shoulder, it was even more unexpected. I half-saw the whole thing as a setup. But I am a big fan of Peter David's, so I was willing to give him some slack. And I was rewarded with, at the least, an interesting storyline that didn't break canon. As long as they tread this particular path, I will continually be waiting for David and co. to find their way back to the original source, but they seem to be striking off on tangents pretty well. *** ½
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