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And the Dark Sacred Night Hardcover – 1 Apr 2014

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Broadway Books (A Division of Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group Inc) (1 April 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307377938
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307377937
  • Product Dimensions: 17 x 3.5 x 24.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,193,327 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Praise for Julia Glass

"The Widower's Tale"
"Beautifully sensitive . . . "The Widower's Tale" is about the rub between old values and new times . . . In the tradition of "Jane Eyre, " it builds to a conflagration, a crisis that shakes everyone out of their complacency. But Glass quickly smothers the flames of catastrophe, for her vision is essentially more hopeful than tragic." --"Los Angeles Times"

"A satisfyingly clear-eyed and compassionate view of American entitlement and its fallout . . . [Glass] approaches the ties of kinship with the same joyfully disruptive spirit that animated her previous books." --"The New York Times Book Review"

"A masterful exploration of the secret places of the human heart." --"Richmond Times-Dispatch"

"I See You Everywhere"
"Glass is the Edith Wharton for the twenty-first century." --"Pittsburgh Post-Gazette"

"Rich, intricate, and alive with emotion . . . An honest portrait of sister-love . . . Brave and forgiving." --"The New York Times Book Review"

"The Whole World Over"
"Beautiful and satisfying, chock-full of the gorgeous, heartbreaking stuff that makes life worth living." --"The Rocky Mountain News "

"A voluptuous treat." --"Entertainment Weekly"

"Three Junes"
"Enormously accomplished . . . Rich, absorbing, and full of life."--"The New Yorker"

"Radiant . . . An intimate literary triptych of lives pulled together and torn apart." --"Chicago Tribune"

"Almost threatens to burst with all the life it contains. Glass's ability to illuminate and deepen the mysteries of her characters' lives is extraordinary." --Michael Cunningham, author of "The Hours"

"Winner of the National Book Award for her 2002 debut, "Three Junes," Julia Glass takes another sympathetic look at the complexities of contemporary life in this novel about family secrets. . . Examining complicated family relationships among several families whose lives intertwine in unexpected ways, this warm and engaging story about what it means to be a father will appeal to most readers." --"Library Journal"
"Glass explores the pain of family secrets, the importance of identity, and the ultimate meaning of family . . . HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Although Glass borrows characters from her National Book Award-winning "Three Junes," it is not necessary to have read that previous book to enjoy this lovely, highly readable, and thought-provoking novel." --"Booklist, "starred review
"The Widower's Tale"
"Beautifully sensitive . . . "The Widower's Tale" is about the rub between old values and new times . . . In the tradition of "Jane Eyre, " it builds to a conflagration, a crisis that shakes everyone out of their complacency. But Glass quickly smothers the flames of catastrophe, for her vision is essentially more hopeful than tragic." --"Los Angeles Times"
"A satisfyingly clear-eyed and compassionate view of American entitlement and its fallout . . . [Glass] approaches the ties of kinship with the same joyfully disruptive spirit that animated her previous books." --"The New York Times Book Review"
"A masterful exploration of the secret places of the human heart." --"Richmond Times-Dispatch"
"I See You Everywhere"
"Glass is the Edith Wharton for the twenty-first century." --"Pittsburgh Post-Gazette"
"Rich, intricate, and alive with emotion . . . An honest portrait of sister-love . . . Brave and forgiving." --"The New York Times Book Review"
"The Whole World Over"
"Beautiful and satisfying, chock-full of the gorgeous, heartbreaking stuff that makes life worth living." --"The Rocky Mountain News "
"A voluptuous treat." --"Entertainment Weekly"
"Three Junes"
"Enormously accomplished . . . Rich, absorbing, and full of life."--"The New Yorker"
"Radiant . . . An intimate literary triptych of lives pulled together and torn apart." --"Chicago Tribune"
"Almost threatens to burst with all the life it contains. Glass's ability to illuminate and deepen the mysteries of her characters' lives is extraordinary." --Michael Cunningham, author of "The Hours"

About the Author

Julia Glass is the author of" Three Junes, " winner of the 2002 National Book Award for Fiction; "The Whole World Over; I See You Everywhere, "winner of the 2009 Binghamton University John Gardner Book Award; and "The Widower's Tale." Her essays have been widely anthologized. A recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York Foundation for the Arts, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Glass also teaches fiction writing, most frequently at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. She lives with her family in Marblehead, Massachusetts.


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Format: Hardcover
This is a well-written novel about a man's search for his biological father. The story centres on a very modern type of family in the US and their friends/partners. It is a bitter-sweet tale which deserves a read! The title comes from the Louis Armstrong song "Oh What a Wonderful World" in case you were wondering!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Amazing read as always .some shared characters with previous novel Three Junes .excellent writer .never dissappoints
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars 207 reviews
36 of 39 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Our Imperfectly Connected World 13 Mar. 2014
By Jill I. Shtulman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Julia Glass’s latest book strikes right to the core of personal identity. How do solidify our sense of who we are if we don’t know where we came from? In what ways can we take our place in the universe if our knowledge of our past is incomplete?

Kit Noonan has reached a fork in the road. Underemployed with no clear sense of purpose, he is floundering, until his wife urges him to take some time away to work out the secret of his father’s identity. That search leads him back to his stepfather Jasper in Vermont – a self-sufficient outdoorsman who effectively raised him along with two stepbrothers. Eventually, the journey brings him to Lucinda, the elderly wife of a stroke-ravaged state senator and onward to Fenno (from Julia Glass’s first book) and his husband Walter.

Through all this, Kit discovers the enigma of connections and which connections prevail. As one character states, “..the past is like the night: dark yet sacred. It’s the time of day when most of us sleep, so we think of the day as the time we really live, the only time that matters, because the stuff we do by day somehow makes us who we are. We feel the same way about the present…. But there is no day without night, no wakefulness without sleep, no present without past.”

The biggest strength of this novel – by far – is the beautifully rendered portrayal of characters. Kit, Jasper, Lucinda and her family, Feeno and Walter – even Kit’s twins – are so perfectly portrayed that they could walk off the pages. As a reader, I cared about every one of them and – as the book sequentially goes from one character to another – I felt a sense of loss from temporarily leaving him or her behind.

The only weakness was an overabundance of detail (scenes, back story, etc.), which robbed me of using my imagination to “fill in the blanks.” While vaguely discomforting, this story is so darn good and the writing is so darn strong that I was glad to be immersed in its world for the several days I was reading. Kit’s journey and his recognition of what “family” really means has poignancy and authenticity. 4.5.
28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WORKS FOR ME 13 April 2014
By Susan D - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I won't go into the plot summary as a number of reviews here explain that aspect of this novel quite well, but just wanted to join those saying they were completely swept up by Glass's emotional, historical, and cultural intelligence; her moving, complex characters; and her often luminous prose. While I had to think back to some of the details of Malchy Burns' life and death — as well as Walter's (from "Three Junes" and "The Whole World Over"), I felt as if I were trying to think back to people I'd briefly known intimately 15 years ago and had to remind myself of who they were and who we have become. Glass made me want to reread her earlier books — which says a lot as I'm often someone who reads a lot but only tends to reread books I teach. Glass is completely an adult author in the way she handles people — and I love that about her novels. She's compassionate. She's hopeful that people can at least try to become their best selves. She's unafraid to explore a range of different personalities, members of both genders and multiple generations — all why addressing how people have behaved in certain moments of our shared history — behaviors they may regret in hindsight, or at least need to revisit and rethink. She also touches on so many people going through experiences similar to those I know — former professors now living as adjuncts while trying to pay the bills in New Jersey, young people who know very little about AIDS (let alone life before technology), musicians barely earning a living, book store owners who can now longer function in Manhattan, mountain climbers who need new hips and new relationships. Factor in that she's got parts of this novel set in a music camp in the Berkshires, the Village, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Provincetown, I feel as if she's writing about people I might know — and doing it extraordinarily well.

While I acknowledge there might be a few spots where not everyone wants to suspend disbelief — that's our right as readers — I just got pretty upset reading a truly snarky and unfair review in the Wall Street Journal. I felt like it was dissing me for loving Glass.

All I really know is that in the end there aren't THAT many wonderful books and If I were writing novels, I'd love to attempt one like this. Since I'm a fiction reading obsessive — and am hungry for novels that capture our zeitgeist as I'm experiencing it — I always feel blessed to find such a satisfying read.
36 of 41 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Short story long?, 3.5 stars 13 Mar. 2014
By Sharon Isch - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Big Julia Glass fan here. But not as enthralled as I expected to be by her latest novel, the story of a thirtysomething husband and father of twins who's lost his job and whose wife thinks that what he should do, now that he has the time, is to search for the father he never knew and put an end to that gaping hole in his life story once and for all. Christopher, known as "Kit," takes her up on it.

All these many years, his mom has pointblank refused to tell Kit anything at all about the dad he never had and will not be persuaded to do otherwise. So, while Ms.Glass is filling us in on the Mom & Dad backstory, Kit takes to the road to go visit his former stepfather, Jasper, the nice guy whom Mom long ago divorced, to see what info he might be able to pry out of him. After Kit's couple of weeks or so with Jasper, his two visiting sons and some snow storms, Jasper decides to go against his ex wife's wishes and try to help Kit by secretly putting in a call to Kit's paternal grandmother to see if she and her family would be willing to meet with their grandson. Turns out she is more than willing. Delighted, in fact. As is Dad's old pal Fenno MacLeod, whom many of you will remember as the leading man in Glass's National Book Award winning novel, "Three Junes." Soon plans for a family reunion are underway.

At heart, this is an interesting story--but as a very prolonged novel bogged down with incredibly long and detailed accounts of the lives and thoughts of its relatively ordinary characters? Not so much. Took me a little over a week to plow through what would normally for me have taken just a couple or three days.
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars How Important Are Our Biological Roots? 16 April 2014
By Fairbanks Reader - Bonnie Brody - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Kit Noonan is an unemployed professor of Inuit art history. He did not receive tenure at the college where he was teaching. Not only did he not publish, but he was not good at networking with others. He did receive a job offer in Las Vegas but he and his wife Sandra chose not to accept it, hoping he'd get an offer nearer to the east coast. Unfortunately, he did not. They have fraternal twins and Kit is floundering. Most likely he is suffering from depression.

Sandra urges Kit to search out his birth father. His mother, Daphne, raised him by herself until she married Jasper. Jasper, who had two boys of his own who were much older than Kit, adopted him. Kit sets off to see Jasper in order to find his roots and discover who his biological father is.

This is a novel of small events with large implications; of family roots and their impact on life. While I loved Three Junes and The Widower's Tale, I can't say the same thing about this book. Most of the time, I found myself bored and wanting it to be over. Even though I was familiar with the characters from the previous novel, Three Junes, I just didn't care enough about the way they were presented here.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fans of Julia Glass's previous book, THREE JUNES -- you will not be disappointed 22 April 2014
By shelz123 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The first time I finished reading THREE JUNES (Julia Glass's first book, a kind-of/sort-of prequel to this book, AND THE DARK SACRED NIGHT), it was 2am. I'd stayed up half the night, because I just couldn't bear to put that book down and part with those characters, whom I'd grown to love over the past 300 or so pages. And as soon as I was done, I opened the book back up to page 1 and started reading it over again.

I'd never done that with a book before (or since). So when I heard that some of my favorite characters from THREE JUNES were going to make another appearance in this new book, of course AND THE DARK SACRED NIGHT made it to the top of my reading list. It didn't disappoint. It has been several years since I read THREE JUNES, so at first I couldn't remember who the overlap characters were supposed to be. But it soon all came flooding back to me, and I was able to relish in the familiar voices as well as get to know some fascinating new characters, too.

Julia Glass's books aren't so much about plot, exactly (though plenty happens). But she excels in drawing the quiet spaces between plot -- she draws the inner worlds of characters so precisely, so minutely, that you find yourself nostalgic for a world you've never known, or people you've never met, or places you'll probably never visit.

This is a master-work by one of the best novelists writing today.
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