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Dandelion Wine Hardcover – 1 Jun 1976

4.5 out of 5 stars 48 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 1 Jun 1976
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--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 239 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books (P); Revised edition (Jun. 1976)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553119303
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553119305
  • Package Dimensions: 17.3 x 10.4 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,281,631 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

'Bradbury has a remarkable range of intensity and vision' Sunday Times

‘A haunting, nostalgic novel… DANDELION WINE is among the best of his earthbound works… He wrote about life on this planet in a richly poetic style that often makes the familiar world seem as fantastic and mysterious as the distant future or outer space.’
Washington Post

‘Bradbury at his best.’
Washington Post Book World

'It is impossible not to admire the vigour of his prose, similes and metaphors constantly cascading from his imagination' Spectator

‘No other writer uses language with greater originality and zest. he seems to be a American Dylan Thomas – with dsicipline’ Sunday Telegraph

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

The summer of '28 was a vintage season for a growing boy. A summer of green apple trees, mowed lawns, and new sneakers. Of half-burnt firecrackers, of gathering dandelions, of Grandma's belly-busting dinner. It was a summer of sorrows and marvels and gold-fuzzed bees. A magical, timeless summer in the life of a twelve-year-old boy named Douglas Spaulding--remembered forever by the incomparable Ray Bradbury. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Shivari VINE VOICE on 3 July 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In the character of Douglas, Bradbury manages to catch that fleeting moment in time when we are still connected to the child's sense of wonder at the mystery and beauty of the universe and the sheer joy of being alive, but also have acquired the adult ability to reflect and bring a coherent narrative structure to our existence. A moment when the soul is still wide open and the mind is aware of it.

All too soon the universe shrinks down to the mundane: school, exams, jobs, careers, mortgages, bills. The mind busies itself in facts and logic. The joy of life shrivels into the search for entertainment. The soul shrivels.

This book is unlikely to be enjoyed or fully appreciated by young people. But those who have a perspective both on childhood and adulthood and who see how much we and others have lost along the way, these people cannot help but be moved, heart and soul.

I for one regard this as one of the finest novels ever written.
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This book reads like a magic fairytale, but is surprisingly firmly rooted in the day to day life in a small American town. It reads through the eyes of a young boy who experiences a summer that changes his life (in a good way). It is incredible how much insight author Ray Bradbury puts into this story. Small separate stories which are completely woven into each other - in a funny way one could say that this the art of telling a story that shows that life too can be like a great art, without being aware of it. (if that makes sense).

It is so compelling - full of surprises - so timeless - no plot - no artificial ingredients - just life - people - growth - and a magic summer.

This is one of a kind!
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Hated Bradbury when I was forced to read him as a schoolgirl but what a difference 30 years makes! Bradbury's talent for writing was obvious in Dandelion Wine, so I would suggest if you want to try him, this is a good book to start with.
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Beautifully written semi-autobiographical novel, full of poetic writing and similes!
Set in the American mid-west in the 1920's when Douglas and his brother are growing up and encountering the various characters and their stories from their family and in the village.
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bradbury is unbeatable
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Format: Paperback
I originally read Ray Bradbury's Dandelion Wine when I was young, and found it really disappointing. I've just re-read it for the first time, and realised that I was entirely wrong in how I looked at it.

The trouble was that Bradbury's Something Wicked This Way Comes was (and is) one of my favourite books ever - and the edition of Dandelion Wine I own (the Corgi SF Collector's Library paperback with the crinkly purple cover) makes it sound like another Something Wicked. The tagline on the front says 'It was a fantastic summer of terror and wonder - a fantastic summer he would never forget...' I can imagine the young me thinking 'But this isn't right. It's not fantasy at all.' And it isn't.

At its most basic, Dandelion Wine is an affectionate portrait of a smallish US town in 1928, with a linking thread of a twelve-year-old boy. It's straightforward, sometimes a little mawkish, sometimes dramatic fiction. And it's Bradbury at his most poetic (something else the young reader probably didn't appreciate) - the lyricism is sometimes so strong it's almost as much a self-parody as John Sladek's breathtakingly sharp pastiche short story Joy Ride by 'Barry duBray.' (One of a set of evil take-offs including a story by 'Iclick As-I-move'.)

Reading it now, though, much older, I think there's something else to Dandelion Wine. It's almost a bookend piece to Something Wicked. Where that was a fantasy about being young and growing up, Dandelion Wine is often a book about growing old and dying, despite that young protagonist. Yes, it portrays beautifully being a pre-teen in a small town in the 20s, but age and death have a habit of dominating the scene. It's wonderfully structured as a set of vignettes - some as short as a single page, some making good length stories.
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I first read this book well before the days of wi-fi, mobile phones and the internet in a paperback which cost me 3/6 - that's 17.5p to you post decimalisation folks. But, of course, I had to save up my pocket money for it so, it was worth a lot more than the cover price.

I probably didn't understand it that well at the time and can't remember reading it more than once. The paperback has long gone but, I recently downloaded the Kindle edition and Ray's magic (or is that, "magick"?) has literally blown my socks off. Maybe it - or, maybe I - needed those intervening fifty years to mature. Whatever, it's certainly a heady vintage now and well worth un-corking. Take a sip you'll be hooked....

By the way, I only awarded 5 stars because there weren't any more than that to award - it deserves many, many more.
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Format: Paperback
They say childhood ends when you start to remember it. Twelve year old Douglas is on the verge of this moment. He is realizing that summer is made of certain sounds, sights, smells, experiences. But somehow he also realizes that -- once past childhood -- we notice these glories much less often. Afraid of losing these things, he begins to keep a diary off all that he learns, all that he notices, all that happens.
This book is nothing short of magical. Bradbury captures the essence of summer seen through the eyes of a child who is gently leaving childhood behind. You will remember the small American town and its inhabitants for years after you've turned the last page. Simply said, you must read this book. Steal from your children's piggy bank to buy it if you must, but you have to read this book. You will not be disappointed.
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