£14.80
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Dancing Ledge has been added to your Basket

Dispatch to:
To see addresses, please
Or
Please enter a valid UK postcode.
Or
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Dancing Ledge Paperback – 18 Aug 2010

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£14.80
£9.18 £10.58
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£14.80 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special offers and product promotions


Frequently bought together

  • Dancing Ledge
  • +
  • Chroma: A Book of Colour - June '93
  • +
  • Modern Nature: The Journals of Derek Jarman
Total price: £36.78
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: University of Minnesota Press; Reprint edition (18 Aug. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0816674493
  • ISBN-13: 978-0816674497
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.8 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 783,158 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

"Jarman s light illuminates the wilderness as brightly as ever." "New Statesman""

"Jarman s gifts, in prose as well as film, are spatial, visual, imagistic." "Sunday Times (London)""

"This brutally candid memoir by British artist and filmmaker Jarman offers a glimpse into the making of such controversial films as Sebastiane, The Tempest, and Caravaggio. Writing in a diary format, Jarman jumps back and forth in time, discussing his acceptance of his homosexuality at age 16 and his strong belief that a fully realized sexuality must drive art and politics." --Publishers Weekly

"Jarman writes in lucid, accessible, and evocative prose. His highly articulate musings on contemporary art and cinema (neither of which has his approval) are both thought-provoking and interesting." --Library Journal

"Jarman's light illuminates the wilderness as brightly as ever." --New Statesman

About the Author

One of England's foremost filmmakers, Derek Jarman (1942-1994) wrote and directed many feature films, including Sebastiane, Jubilee, Caravaggio, and Blue, as well as numerous short films and music videos. He was a stage designer, artist, writer, gardener, and an outspoken AIDS and queer rights activist in the UK and the United States. His books include At Your Own Risk, Modern Nature, and Smiling in Slow Motion, all available from the University of Minnesota Press.


What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This edition was published in 1991. It is autobiography of Derek Jarman's early life. He openly talks about his sexuality, his typical middle class upbringing, boarding school, parents, training in art at the Slade school and his sexual encounters with men in his early days. The first chapter opens with his research on Caravaggio for his film. While he was working on his film, he recalled and wrote about his past in the most vivid and moving manner. I found one needs to read this book before his later autobiographical books titled in order; At Your Own Risk (published after Dancing Ledge), and Kicking the Pricks (this book includes a series of interviews he had while he was alive). Above all, this 1991 edition includes his black and white paintings, and photos from his films, behind the scene and it is beautifully written and highly recommend it to the fans of Jarman as well as people who are interested in making art films and queer history.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
An utterly magnificent portrait of a man in his time and prime. 'Dancing Ledge' is brim full of the most wonderful characters from the artistic scene of the 1960s and '70s - and Derek Jarman brings them to life with a pen that's finely honed to pick up every detail and nuance.

A prophet is never understood in his own country - or words to that effect. Jarman has always been a bit of an outsider, and that is probably his greatest strength. His writing bubbles with wit and subversion. His powers of observation are second to none. And he has the most wonderful command of language.

The world was a poorer place when Derek Jarman died, but his written work (quite apart from his paintings and designs) will be his monument - a testament to a freer and perhaps more exciting age than our own has become in recent years.

'Dancing Ledge' is well worth having - and once you've read it, you'll most likely want the rest of his literate, entertaining, and moving output. Go get.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse