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A Dance to the Music of Time

4.6 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Books on Tape (Jan. 1957)
  • ISBN-10: 5557120270
  • ISBN-13: 978-5557120272
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)

Product Description

About the Author

Anthony Powell's work includes "Miscellaneous Verdicts" and "Under Review," both available from the University of Chicago Press. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I place this work among literary mammoths of our time, including Proust's "Remembrance of Things Past," Durrell's "The Alexandria Quartet" and Henry Williamson's "A Chronicle of Ancient Sunlight." My judgment results not merely from this work's great length, but rather in Powell's greatly detailed characters, sprawling plot development and sheer READABILITY. Despite its great length [about 3,000 pages] it still pales in length in comparison to the aforementioned "Chronicle," which at times, plods along and tallies up to approximately 8,000 pages. Bravo to the University of Chicago Press for re-publishing this work in such a beautiful edition, as well. Buy this set and read this wonderful work. You'll enjoy it.
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Format: Paperback
For people who like Jane Austen, yet set in more recent times, Anthony Powell's series is worth reading. The story lines are not gripping thrillers, yet one becomes interested in the characters as they drift in and out of the main protagonist's life. I picked up the first `trilogy' in the reissue of Powell's work because I had watched and enjoyed the televisation made by one of the UK's networks. All the reviewers said that the series did not reflect the depth of the books. So I read the books to compare them. I found that the television series mirrored the books very well indeed. The producers had caught the wistfull and distant mood of Nicholas Jenkins well and the dissipation of the upper classes between the two world wars excellently. Do the stories go anywhere? Not in the accepted sense of the word. They exist in a time capsule, for us to observe - a measured dance to the music of time, as so aptly titled. If you are a fan of Evelyn Waugh and Nancy Mitford you will! enjoy Anthony Powell, and if you enjoy these novels yet have not read Waugh and Mitford, try them as well.
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Format: Paperback
This volume contains the first three novels of Anthony Powell's masterpiece, A Dance to the Music of Time. Powell's work is social comedy in the tradition of Jane Austen and George Meredith. Contemporary writers with whom he is often compared include Marcel Proust and Evelyn Waugh. The 12 short novels of A Dance to the Music of Time give a panoramic picture of English upper-class social life from 1921 to 1971 that is both intensely realistic and amazingly funny. Readers either love Powell's work or can't understand what others see in it. My own opinion is that Dance is the best novel written in the twentieth century. Others share this view: A Dance to the Music of Time is #43 on the recently constructed Random House/Modern Library 100 Best Poll (of twentieth century fiction) and was made into a 4-part miniseries on British television just about a year ago.
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Format: Paperback
First, although I adore this series, I would like to demur from the description of this series as a comedy. Certainly there are many comic situations and laughable characters, but Powell's (pronounced POE-UHL, not POW-UHL) comedy is intended less to make uslaugh than to make ussmile. I know many novels that are far funnier than this one, and if that were the book's only virtue, it would not enjoy the status that it does.
Above all, this is a work that limns in almost tedious detail the interrelations and interworkings of a segment of English society in the 20th century. These first three books take you from the early twenties into the early thirties. Despite the series great length, there is nothing epic about the scale of the novels except for the overall length of of the series as a whole. The scenes are all horribly mundane. A party here, a dinner there, a chance meeting in a bar, more parties, more dinners. But as the parties and dinners multiply, and as one social encounter builds upon another, the series does indeed take on an epic quality.
This new edition is far more attractive than the old mass market edition of the series, but I do wish that someone would have taken the effort to supply an appendix (perhaps to the final volume) that would (as in some editions of Trollope and Proust) explain who all the characters are and to whom they are related. By the sixth volume in the series, I began to find it extremely difficult to remember precisely where each character fit in the social world as a whole.
The greatest virtues of Powell's series are his richly delineated characters (of which there are at least fifty to a hundred who are to some degree significant) and his marvelously elegant prose. I believe that anyone who loves novels would love this series, in particular those who have enjoyed Proust.
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Format: Paperback
This is really a review of the University of Chicago Press' excellent paperback edition: the cover image is of the French painting that gives the sequence it's title, wittily spread over all four titles.Also well-printed and bound. Much better than the crass and tacky TV tie-in dustcover and cheap paper of the English reprint.
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