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The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (Unabridged) Audio Download – Unabridged

4.5 out of 5 stars 2,041 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 6 hours and 3 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Random House AudioBooks
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 26 Sept. 2005
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002SQ4XXE
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Many of the people who have reviewed this book have first hand experience of children with behavioural problems, or links to Aspergers and / or Autism. They have (almost entirely) commented on how this book reflects in some way their experiences or that of friends or relatives. They have almost all enjoyed the book, and having read these reviews you may feel that, if you have no such experience, the book may not appeal to you.
Well, I personally have no experience in these areas, and I can honestly say that this has gone straight into my all time top 5 reads!
The story is wonderfully crafted, and not a page goes by when you do not learn something new about Christopher, the central character who has, I understand, though it is not stated in the book, Aspergers Syndrome (the book is actually written entirely from Christophers perspective).
This is one of those rare books that makes you want to discuss (not just talk about) the story. My wife and I both read it over the same weekend, and we kept finding ourselves going back to it to talk through some of the difficulties that Christopher faced, and how it must be to have to deal with them, either as the child or as a parent. This story really gives an insight into a mind which, in some ways, is far more developed than the mind of an "ordinary" person. It also gives you a feel for what it must be like to need complete structure and order to a life which can never absolutely have both. The lack of what you and I would call "emotion" was in itself deeply moving, and several times I found myself asking how I would cope if one of my two children had the same difficulties.
This is a remarkable book. If only everyone could read it, society would become a much more understanding and accepting place for those who suffer from the effects of conditions such as Aspergers, ADHD and Autism.
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Format: Paperback
This is a murder mystery novel like no other. The detective, and narrator, is Christopher Boone. He is fifteen and has Asperger’s, a form of Autism. He knows a very great deal about maths and very little about human beings. He loves lists, patterns and the truth and owns a pet rat called Toby. He hates the colours yellow and brown and hates being touched. He knows it’s going to be a good day if he passes red cars on his way to school on the bus. He has never gone further than the end of the road on his own, but when he finds a neighbour’s dog murdered he sets out on a terrifying journey, which will turn his whole world upside down.
Haddon has created a wonderfully brilliant character. His depiction of Christopher’s world is deeply moving, very funny and utterly convincing. He shows a unique insight into the autistic mind of the unlikely teenage detective who stumbles on everyday normalities as obstacles which further leads him to unearthing secrets that shock and startle him into running away.
What drives Haddon’s tale, however, is his empathy for his protagonist: it might have been easy to make Christopher an amusing suburban hybrid of Forest Gump and Adrian Mole, but the author digs deeper, mining a deeper emotional truth with a rigorous sense of purpose, one expressly devoid of cheap homily. He also knows a damn good page-turner: the emotional beats here are resonant and well deserved, the key plot revelations affecting, and the payoff deeply satisfying.
Although a work of fiction, it is both an educational and vividly honest adaptation of the trails and hurdles that people like Christopher undergo on a daily basis and that most of us are unaware of. A lesson can surely be learned from reading this boy’s curiously different story.
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By A Customer VINE VOICE on 16 Aug. 2004
Format: Paperback
If I were reviewing this as an adult's book then I would award it 5 stars without any hesitation. Any book that holds my attention to such a degree that I read it in one sitting certainly deserves that, despite the fact that towards the end I started to lose sympathy for the narrator.
However, this review deals with the so-called Children's Edition. Although the text is clear and simple, this is NOT in my opinion a book for children; young adults yes, but not children. The bad language and profanities throughout the text make it unsuitable. I lost count of the amount of times I read the 'F' word and worse. The narrator's mental problem means he remembers everything he sees/hears in detail and can repeat it verbatim. In one passage, he does this with words he sees written on a tube station wall, repeating something I wish no child of mine to read. Doubtless, kids hear language as bad, and worse, every day at school, but that doesn't automatically mean that responsible parents want them reading it at home.
Don't let the bright childlike cover-art on this edition, or the fact it is frequently seen displayed beside Rowling and Snicket, fool you into thinking it is suitable for ages 12 and under. If you are the broad-minded parent of a precocious child, then go ahead; however, discerning parents may wish to check this book out BEFORE ordering a copy for a child. I feel it only fair to make this clear. After all, television programmes that use bad language before the watershed are obliged to broadcast a warning beforehand.
This is already a best-selling adult book. Children aren't children for long; this book will be around for years, they can always read it a year or two later.
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