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Cured: Slow Techniques for Flavouring Meat, Fish and Vegetables Hardcover – Illustrated, 13 Sep 2010

4.3 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Jacqui Small LLP (13 Sept. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1906417415
  • ISBN-13: 978-1906417413
  • Product Dimensions: 21 x 2.9 x 27 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 428,776 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

‘A beautiful encyclopedia of meat and fish curing'

(The Times)

'Nominated for Food Book of the Year'

(Guild of Food Writers Awards 2011)

‘The sheer diversity of the recipes offered, each beautifully photographed, proves that one can spend a lifetime learning the curer's art. Enticing stuff for cooks of all levels'

(Great British Food)

‘A useful stocking filler for the more serious cook'

(Nigel Slater Observer)

‘A gift for the chef who has everything, an enjoyable read, fine photography evokes hunger for the dishes within.'

(Food and Travel)

About the Author

Cook and food writer Lindy Wildsmith specializes in British country and Italian regional food. Fish and game, home cooking and kitchen crafts, such as preserving, curing, smoking and potting are high on her agenda. She is also a travel writer - in love with Italy - where she lived for many years. She is fascinated by the ties between people, culture and food. She has been a follower of Slow Food almost since its inception. She is a great believer in the importance of good, fresh, ingredients and using local shops. The way we used to cook is one of Lindy’s inspirations and she collects early cookery books. She likes nothing better than getting stuck into some serious research as long as she can escape into the kitchen at meal times. She is the author of Cured, which was shortlisted for the André Simon award and the Guild of Food Writers best food book in 2011. She has written other more general cookery books and a book on preserving. Lindy speaks fluent Italian, runs Italian cookery courses and has an in-depth knowledge of Italy and Italian food and is currently translating an Italian cookery book called Love Italian Food by Maddelena Caruso to be published by Jacqui Small. One of the great mysteries of modern lifestyle, Lindy says, is why does everyone want to cook like a chef? And why is the word cook fast becoming a dirty word? Even home cooks are starting to be referred to as chefs. Lindy believes that eating is as essential as breathing and that eating and cooking are inseparable and that sitting around a table with friends and family is one of the great joys of life. She writes a monthly blog http://grown-upfood.blogspot.com/ and you can follow her on twitter @lindywildsmith Lindy runs The Chef’s Room fish and cookery school in Wales where she teaches regularly with Franco Taruschio, founder of the Walnut Tree Inn. She teaches residential courses at Denman - the National WI College near Abingdon in Oxfordshire, at Hart’s Barn in Gloucestershire and Divertimenti in London. She also speaks professionally and this year she will be taking part in the “Discover the Origin” scheme – presenting seminars for the catering, delicatessen and restaurant trades on Prosciutto di Parma and Parmigiano Reggiano. www.thechefsroom.co.uk



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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
To be fair, only 3/5 may be a little un-just.

I bought this to start myself on curing meats and a few fish. However the undertone of the entire book is that curing is now an obsolete art, replaced by fridge-freezers. There simply isn't enough information on how to preserve meat. e.g. Under the air-dried streaky bacon 'recipe' it just says the finished product 'keeps well.' I'm new to this and need to know exactly how long and how to test if its still good (streaky bacon is one of the only recipes which actually focus's on making the product last longer).

So I was quite upset with the purchase. Then, as I carried on reading, I realized that everything lost on the technical side is made up for on the inspiration side. The whole aim of the book is to take the old techniques of curing, salting, etc and use them as added flavor, not as a method of preserving. I actually found myself inspired by a lot of the things in their and was making potted pheasant and smoked duck breast in no time.

Summery: Not much good for preserving food but great for adding new, interesting flavors to your dishes.

If the book had been described more as a recipe book, than a curers book, I would give it 4/5.

Gary.
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Format: Hardcover
First, what's good about Cured? Wildsmith's enthusiasm is unmistakable. She pulls in good (sometimes great) recipes from across culinary cultures -- no parochialism here! And she pulls in many of her recipes from other excellent chefs and cookery writers, and is unafraid to share credit. If Cured was *only* the recipes, I'd give it four stars and a place on the "eccentric but good" shelf.

But it also pretends to be a guide to curing, and there it falls woefully, even dangerously, short, if you want to cure consistently and safely.

For example, "curing salt" (salt with sodium nitrate or sodium nitrite), an essential, if controversial, ingredient in curing, is given seven general sentences on page 16. The novice curer will find no advice about why curing salt might be needed for one curing project, but is optional for another, and how much to use (Tellingly, "curing salt" appears nowhere in the index -- neither does "salt," odd omissions in a curing book).

Indeed, Wildsmith approaches curing with a cavalier attitude throughout the book. Curing is complex physical and chemical process that requires attention to detail. Experienced curers know this, but the novice will be left in the wilderness. Her "smokehouse rules," for example, are a jumbled, vague hodgepodge of "smoking" *and* "salting guidelines, even though many smoked foods are not salted and vice versa. The list ends weakly, "Before you embark... read how the experts do it."

Sausage-making is barely looked into. Air-dried, fermented sausages are wholly ignored (a brief stab is made on page 90). And, yet, Wildsmith devotes considerable space to air-drying whole hams, a project far beyond the abilities of novice meat curers, for all sorts of biochemical reasons she never looks into.
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Format: Hardcover
We purchased this "Cured" cooking book several months ago and have had problems with some of the recipes. The Carne Salsa turned out brown & very salty all the way through, unedible. The author prepared this meat again & admitted there was too much salt for the quantity of meat! Also tried the Pheasant wrapped in Bacon but some pieces were cooked & the pieces on the bone were raw near the bone! Again the author provided an explanation that it could have been due to her using a copper bottom dish & in her AGA. The author did state that she had not tested all the recipes in the book, they were not her own, which we found very unsatisfactory.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Lindy Wildsmith understands food - I have several of her books all are as wonderful as the others. This one is going to be used quite a bit and quite a bit of experimentation is going to be on the card. Wonderful book.
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Format: Hardcover
Gary admits that his 3* rating is a little unjust. It's more than that. The subtitle is quoted along with the principal 'Cured' title and may be confirmed by clicking on the image of the front cover of the hardback for an enlargement. This subtitle gives an exact idea of what the book is all about - 'Slow Techiques for Enhancing Meat, Fish, Fruit & Vegetables'. If you want to know how to build a direct or indirect smokery or how many months supply of bacon can be prepared in one go, then this is not the book for you. If you want to achieve what it says on the cover, then it certainly is. As if anyone would really want to save any of these recipes ad infinitum once prepared! Splendid value at the Amazon price.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Being a Charcutier myself and one who teaches this craft, I was delighted that this book delivered in all the right places, how refreshing and informative with great pictures too! This book will be now listed on my course handouts as a must buy!

Merci B Q
Marc-Frederic "Le Charcutier Anglais"
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Format: Hardcover
I had found Erlandson and Maynard helpful but couldn't really crack the code of home curing until I read 'Cured'. It is an instruction manual for those who want to get to grips with real home curing along side some brilliant recipes and the usual high production and photographic standard we expect from this Publisher. Indexing is a bit wayward, but for insight, pointers and references to other suppliers it is very useful. The Ham Hock terrine has become a standard dish for guests and the cured and smoked venison turned a near vegetarian. Can't do better than that. Buy it, the advice is nearly always excellent.
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