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Cultivating Development: An Ethnography of Aid Policy and Practice (Anthropology, Culture and Society) Hardcover – 20 Nov 2004

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Pluto Press (20 Nov. 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0745317995
  • ISBN-13: 978-0745317991
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 2.8 x 21.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 8,735,005 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

'A superb book, one of those rarities that can change entire ways of thinking. David Mosse is the first social scientist in a generation who can successfuly take cutting-edge insights from academic anthropology and use them to explain practical problems in development. ... For anyone interested in development, "Cultivating Development" is a do-not-miss experience.' --Scott Guggenheim, Lead Social Scientist, The World Bank '[Mosse's] provocative thesis challenges the received wisdom of that world and compels us to examine afresh the politics and ethics of engaging with development. Amid the profusion of literature in this field, this book stands apart as an insider's account that is consistently critical yet steadfast in respecting its subjects. Highly recommended.' --Amita Baviskar, Visiting Professor, Department of Cultural and Social Anthropology, Stanford University

From the Publisher

'A superb book, one of those rarities that can change entire ways of thinking. David Mosse is the first social scientist in a generation who can successfuly take cutting-edge insights from academic anthropology and use them to explain practical problems in development. ... For anyone interested in development, Cultivating Development is a do-not-miss experience.' Scott Guggenheim, Lead Social Scientist, The World Bank / '[Mosse's] provocative thesis challenges the received wisdom of that world and compels us to examine afresh the politics and ethics of engaging with development. Amid the profusion of literature in this feild, this book stands apart as an insider's account that is consistently critical yet steadfast in respecting its subjects. Highly recommended.' Amita Baviskar, Visiting Professor, Department of Cultural and Social Anthropology, Stanford University

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 review
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A tool to understand aid policy 22 Dec. 2010
By Luiz Fonseca - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Mosse's book is an important tool to whom will develop studies on issues related to policy formulation in developing countries. His excellent methodological approach on a comprehensive idea of 'development' as a social cathegory really contributes to the aid policy understanding.
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