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Crucifix Lane Paperback – 5 Nov 1998

3.7 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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Paperback, 5 Nov 1998
£127.71 £16.56
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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton (5 Nov. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 034069291X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340692912
  • Product Dimensions: 15.4 x 23.2 x 4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,221,341 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

Leaving a club at six o'clock in the morning, Annie Jones is caught up in an accident and knocked unconscious. When she comes round, she finds herself inexplicably 11years into the future. The location is still recognisably London, but it is a London where the river is no longer tidal, where biopiracy is rife and where immigrant refugees have colonised the Marsh Projects, a mosquito-infested ghetto south of the river beyond the Thames Barrier.

Annie is embraced by the Network, an environmental group that provides food, medical supplies and advice to the disadvantaged, and is led by the charismatic and maverick Kellen, to whom Annie is irresistibly drawn. She is also befriended by Leah, a scientist within the Network with a specialist knowledge of the river and its potential for destruction. Gradually, as she learns more about the world in which she finds herself, Annie comes to feel more at home in 2008 than in her superficial and selfish life before the accident. But Kellen's altruism is not genuine. When Annie realises the cost of his treachery, she is compelled to choose between her old self and her new. Crucifix Lane is the setting for the final, dramatic confrontation.

Kate Mosse has written a women's thriller that explores some of the most absorbing moral issues of our time. Steeped in the atmosphere of riverside London, it draws inspiration both from Celtic mysticism and from the use and abuse of developing technology in a gripping synthesis of past and future.

Review

A futuristic thriller-chiller ... scarifyingly convincing ... packed to the gunwales with suspense (The Daily Telegraph)

CRUCIFIX LANE:

'a good read' Literary Review

It could be argued that the defining emotion of all fins-de-siecle is anxiety coupled with a vague sense of destiny and a great curiosity ... All these emotions are cleverly harnessed by Kate Mosse in her second novel, Crucifix Lane (The Times)

This is feminised thriller-writing ... Crucifix Lane is best at imagining the near-future (Sunday Times)

'It could be argued that the defining emotion of all fins-de-siecle -- and certainly this one -- is anxiety, coupled with a vague sense of destiny and, of course, a great curiosity about what life in the new century will be like. All these emotions are cleverly harnessed by Kate Mosse in her second novel, Crucifix Lane.' Jane Shilling, The Times

Scary and very clever (Cosmopolitan)

'[a] likeable ... futuristic thriller [...] Jolly genre writing' The Independent

'Lively, New Age variation on a traditional apocalyptic theme' The Times

A good read (Literary Review)

Nature is biting back in Kate's futuristic thriller (Chichester Observer)

'a futuristic thriller-chiller ... too close for comfort ... scarifyingly convincing. [...] This is fast-moving, beguiling escapism, packed to the gunwales with suspense.' The Daily Telegraph

'Scary and very clever' Cosmopolitan

'anyone who keeps abreast of good fiction should be award of Kate the wordsmith from her first novel, Eskimo Kissing. She has reprised that '96 story of a coming-of-age with a thriller unusual in that it is set principally in the future.' Liverpool Echo

'great' Options

'[A] time-travelling sci-fi ... This is feminised thriller-writing, short on violence, relaxed in handling sex scenes, and largely spurning the usual macho apparatus of guns, chases and mechanical Hollywood-influenced plotting. Crucifix Lane is best at imagining the near-future' Sunday Times

'Nature is biting back in Kate's futuristic thriller' Phil Hewitt, Chichester Observer
'Nature bites back in the new novel from Chichester Festival theatre administrator Kate Mosse.' Phil Hewitt, Chichester Observer, West Sussex (Dec '98)



ESKIMO KISSING:

'A very stylish fictional debut ... one of the most ferociously compelling reads of the year' Sunday Express

'A percipient tale' Vogue

'There is something very persuasive about her clean, confident style' Mail on Sunday

'Part coming-of-age, part first love, part detective story, Eskimo Kissing has a resolution so extraordinary and so disturbing it makes most adoption stories seem mundane' New Statesman

'Heart-warmingly unpretentious, modest and involving' Literary Review

'A keen ear for dialogue and a sharp eye for human behaviour' Sunday Telegraph

'Skilfully crafted ... a fearless and stunning debut' Bernice Rubens

'The tension of a detective story, the tender eroticism of first love and the painful reality of family life in one gripping passage' Maeve Haran

'Utterly engrossing and beautifully constructed' Bel Mooney

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is a good foray into the future world that we have racing ahead to meet us in only 20 or so years. This makes the book an interesting mixture of the easy to understand here and now of emotions that we all feel today, blended with the fear of the unknown fate that will befall us.
I enjoyed the book. The main character, Annie, was well constructed, with a commmon fear for responsibility and disinterest in many aspects of her life. Thrown unexpectedly forwards in time she enjoys the challenges that face her, while not venturing too far from what she knows well - in terms of geographical areas. This is clever as we can build a clear and detailed picture of one area - London, rather than a vague idea about what the future of England will be like.
The other characters could have been bult up further but that would have been at the expense of a longer book so I would change nothing. In particular the book avoids the technophile approach in elaborate detailing of new inventions You see the technology we have today with minor changes in perspective, giving the book an uneasy familiarity with the future when, in fact, much has changed behind closed doors.
I recommend you should read this book if you believe that the next 20 years will mean changing politics, different trends, smaller cars and better buses - but essentially more of the same. It could be one mistake too many. Read on...
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Format: Paperback
Occupying a territory somewhere between Christopher Priest (double reality) and Maggie Gee (political and ecological perspective) this is well written and exciting - though it doesn't offer any enormous surprises. I was also a bit disappointed with the hackneyed devices she used to convey to the reader the scientific information she wanted us to have - either assuming a level of idiocy in the central character which didn't make sense, or having conversations between people who would both have had the required knowledge of the 'remind me about the theory of relativity Neville I just happen to have forgotten it even though my name is Albert Einstein' variety!
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Format: Paperback
The world is just the same but also oh so different 11 years into the future in Kate Mosse's future chiller, as clubber Annie finds out when she wakes up after a fall in Crucifix Lane. Adopted into a group of do-gooders who ostensibly help London's ghettoised poor, she falls for their leader, Kellen. However he has other motives ...

At its heart the real star of this novel is the omnipresent river Thames - dyed blue to make it look good, but slowly creeping up in level waiting for its big chance to drown decadent London. The ecoscience theme behind the main story gets its message across without ramming it down your throat. Intelligently written with believable characters - I thoroughly enjoyed this book, Mosse's debut novel.
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