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Crucible: Trial of Cyric the Mad (The Avatar Series Book 5) by [Denning, Troy]
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Crucible: Trial of Cyric the Mad (The Avatar Series Book 5) Kindle Edition

3.6 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews
Book 5 of 5 in The Avatar Series (5 Book Series)

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Length: 388 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Synopsis

Cyric, one of the youngest and most powerful gods of the Toril pantheon, has gone insane. His destructiv e actions have caused concern in the highest levels of the d eities. It is time for the older gods to intervene and bring this upstart back into line. '

Synopsis

The deities of the Toril pantheon bring Cyric, the youngest and one of the most powerful of the gods, and one who ascended to godhood by his own efforts, to trial before his insanity and destructiveness can endanger their entire world. Reprint.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3117 KB
  • Print Length: 388 pages
  • Publisher: Wizards of the Coast; Reissue edition (10 Jan. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0060B6H9Q
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #377,145 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 13 April 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
When I heard the book was in the first person I was a bit skeptical, but after reading, I think it was an ingenius format. It isn't really first person in a complete sense, but you have to read it to understand what I mean (I don't want to ruin it for you). Bottom line, if you liked the avatar trilogy and Prince of Lies, you will without a doubt enjoy this book the same.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Well, I love this book. Prince of Lies was better to my opinion, but the first person view of one of Cyric's followers is wonderful. Malik, one of the villains, is telling us the story from his completely objective point of view. And that's fun. Needless to say, a villain, has a totally different way of telling a story than your all too tedious goody goody knight with shining armor etc... Some major changes happen too. No one will be completely the same, the way we left them at Prince of Lies. What happened to Kelemvor sucked, but it was bound to happen. To sum it all up, the book is a little boring at the beginning, but believe me, it becomes more and more interesting as you get deeper into it. It's filled with suspense and humor, and I definatelly recommend it.
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By A Customer on 24 Feb. 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The new idea of using the first person as a narrator doesn't seem great, but it really is when you realize he's on the evil side! For once the good guys get practically crushed, it almost feels good, and it was almost sad to see Mystra and Kel.. well I won't say more 'cause I won't spoil, but they formed one of my favorite couple. Well, even I recognize it was a great idea. Malik is hilarious in his descriptions of "Oghma the thieving, unknowning god" and "Mystra the Harlot". I never read the Parched Sea, but I believe I will because Ruha intrigued me. Good work Troy, much better than the Twilight Giants trilogy (which wasn't bad, just a lil stale). Mask and Cyric the Mad rule.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Through the eyes of Malik a fat, dim witted, sniveling, coward, new light is shed upon not just the perspective of the "good" but also that of the "evil". The first person commentary by Malik I found insightful and more often then not humorous. This book is great if you could not get enough of Prince of Lies.
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By A Customer on 18 May 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
There is not much to say. I do not think this deserves to be a sequel to the Avatar trilogy. Compared to those, this is boring, inconsistent and ridiculous crap. Seen as a separate book (not in any real way connected to the afore mentioned trilogy) it is rather good.
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By PT on 28 July 2013
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I do not know why but took me 18 years to buy the last book of the Avatar series. What a big mistake.

Absolutely the second best book after the Prince of Lies. Truly great to the point that need more about Malik & Cyric.

A true classic.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I have to say that this is probably the most shallow, ridiculous TSR novel that I've yet had the pleasure to read. It's unbelievably far-fetched (even for a fantasy novel), with supposedly all-powerful deities bumbling around and plotting like mischievous ten year-olds. The main character, an inept merchant-thief going by the name of Malik, finds himself in predicament after foolish predicament in his quest to appease his evil god.
This is where the book's main interest lies, for instead of the usual good-over-evil scenario the tables are reversed. Chapters seem to alternate between first and third-person perspectives, with Malik taking up the narrative whenever he is directly featured in the action. The plot is ridiculous, but some of the character interaction is very amusing. Cyric is one of the cooler villains in the forgotten realms line, and his wanton cruelty and arrogance will have you chuckling, as will the constant suffering of his pathetic servant.
As a novel, this book is a mildly amusing romp that is almost completely lacking in any sort of plot or depth. It will probably appeal to those who fancy an easy read to whittle away a few hours, but anyone who's interested in a good piece of fantasy fiction would do well to steer clear of this one.
As a game-related accessory, this book possesses a bit more to warrant the readers' attention. It describes several moderately important changes in the Faerunian pantheon, as well as the villains and heroes who inhabit the realms. It is, however, rather a shame that such a far-reaching and potentially realms-shaking novel is as poor as this. Still, the book is useful merely as reference tool or as an obligatory purchase to dedicated realmsphiles.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
So many subplot stories that make the book whole. You want to cheer for Mystra and Kelemvor, but Cyric and the other gods put in good points for their mistakes. Great interaction between mortals and gods and shows how important a mortal can really be.
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