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Criterion Collection: Solaris [DVD] [1972] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

4.2 out of 5 stars 87 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: Russian
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (87 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004NWPY20
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 130,318 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)
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Product description

From Amazon.co.uk

Released in 1972, Solaris is Andrei Tarkovsky's third feature and his most far-reaching examination of human perceptions and failings. It's often compared to Kubrick's 2001, but although both bring a metaphysical dimension to bear on space exploration, Solaris has a claustrophobic intensity which grips the attention over spans of typically Tarkovskian stasis. Donatas Banionis is sympathetic as the cosmonaut sent to investigate disappearances on the space station orbiting the planet Solaris, only to be confronted by his past in the guise of his dead wife, magnetically portrayed by Natalya Bondarchuk. The ending is either a revelation or a conceit, depending on your viewpoint.

On the DVD: Solaris reproduces impressively on DVD in widescreen--which is really essential here--and Eduard Artemiev's ambient score comes over with pristine clarity. There are over-dubs in English and French, plus subtitles in 12 languages. An extensive stills gallery, detailed filmographies for cast and crew, and comprehensive biographies of Tarkovsky and author Stanislaw Lem are valuable extras, as are the interviews with Bondarchuk and Tarkovsky's sister and an amusing 1970s promo-film for Banionis. It would have been better had the film been presented complete on one disc, instead of stretched over two. Even so, the overall package does justice to a powerful and disturbing masterpiece. --Richard Whitehouse -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: DVD.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Enjoyable and absorbing. Very atmospheric. The dubbing into English was so well done it was hardly noticeable.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Flawless Sci-Fi movie. Hard to believe it was made in Russia at the height of communism etc.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
9The film is obviously a classic, and deserves to be seen, but this latest blu-ray iteration (Curzon Artificial Eye) is a let down. The main film on disc one looks fine but I can't perceive any upgrade in the quality of the print on previous dvd verions. The extras on disc two are, however, very poor and make spending the extra money on the blu ray pointless. Two short audio essays by a cod psychologist who fails to actual say anything insightful about the fim, but rather prefers to paraphrase Lacan and Baudrillard. This is frankly embarrassing, and the film deserves better. It reminds me of the Woody Allen gag from Broadway Danny Rose about the two complainers who go to an Italian restaurant: terrible food and such small portions.

I wish I had saved my money for the Criterion version.

I only wish that I had
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By DJS on 7 Nov. 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Quite possibly the greatest film ever made (not a very sensible notion in itself, but a good accolade none the less).
Can be genuinely described as "art". Very slow in parts, but it's not plot or dialogue driven, more mood and "emotionally intelligent".
Tries to portray grief, guilt, self-reconciliation through non-verbal imaging, very successfully. The scene where Hari (the heroine) first appears is still one of the most stunning pieces of cinematography I've ever seen. I first saw the film in the eighties and thought it brilliant then, but now it seems even better. No one could get away with making a film like this any more.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Good film.
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Format: DVD
With Solaris (1972) Andrei Tarkovsky reached a defining point in his career. The way the film looks, the basically humanist themes of the script, the languid pacing and the highly literate complex cross-referencing to other iconic works of art all became permanent features of his work from here onwards. The previous two works had certainly not lacked intellectual weight and there are many who see (with some justification) Ivan's Childhood (1962) and (especially) Andrei Roublev (1966) as showing Tarkovsky at his best. However, their narrative structures are rigidly cinema-bound and totally lacking in the free-flowing meditative and associative tendencies of Tarkovsky's mature style announced here. Ivan's Childhood is a relatively conventional novel adaptation albeit shot-through with an extraordinarily hallucinatory quality, while Andrei Roublev is an unconventional slice of medieval Russian history told through several cinematic tableaux. Both of these films are unique in Tarkovsky's output and were hugely successful both artistically and commercially. Andrei Roublev however had caused consternation for the Soviet authorities who were not happy with the overt religious content. It was only after considerable foreign pressure that the film came to be released in the USSR at all. The 5 years following the completion of Roublev saw Tarkovsky at loggerheads with the powers that be not only over that film's release, but also over the choice of material for his next project. This kind of bureaucratic haggling would eventually drive the director out of Russia for good.

Tarkovsky wanted to make a personal film about his mother, but had to make do with the `safe' option of Stanisław Lem's science fiction novel Solaris.
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By E. A. Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 24 Feb. 2014
Format: DVD
If Andrei Tarkovsky had been an English-speaking director, then "Solaris" would be known and loved as deeply as "2001: A Space Odyssey."

Sadly, Tarkovsky's best-known movie is not nearly well-known enough. This is not a "Star Trek" style narrative where there is a problem to be solved -- It's a quiet, contemplative sci-fi movie that uses an alien planet as the backdrop for one man's wounded soul to be healed. You may need to watch it a few times to fully absorb its meaning, but its beauty and sorrow are enough to pull you in.

Solaris is a distant water planet, whose ocean seems to be an intelligent life form. There is a human space station orbiting it for scientific study, but the mission really hasn't gone very far, mainly because almost all the crew has had meltdowns or hallucinations. Troubled psychologist Kris Kelvin (Donatas Banionis) is being sent to Solaris to determine whether the mission should continue.

But when he arrives, he finds that the space station is falling apart, and his friend Dr. Gibarian (Sos Sargsyan) has committed suicide. The two remaining scientists, Dr. Snaut (Jüri Järvet) and Dr. Sartorius (Anatoliy Solonitsyn), are strangely unwilling to talk to Kris -- and they seem to be hiding living creatures on the space station. When Kris' wife Hari (Natalya Bondarchuk) -- who committed suicide years ago -- appears, he begins to realize what Solaris truly is.

Technically speaking, "Solaris" is a science fiction movie. After all, everything that happens centers on an intelligent water-planet, an alien intelligence that can only communicate through creating replicas so perfect that they don't know they aren't human.
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