Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £5.22

Save £3.77 (42%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Creation Stories: Riots, Raves and Running a Label by [McGee, Alan]
Kindle App Ad

Creation Stories: Riots, Raves and Running a Label Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 38 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£5.22

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review

'A true believer in the power of music and more importantly a believer in the people that make music. He gave me, and many more like me, a chance to change my life. A pity he supports Rangers' Noel Gallagher

'McGee was our Malcolm McLaren and Tony Wilson. An instigator and motivator, a born upsetter. I've never met anyone like him and neither have you. This is his story' Bobby Gillespie

'McGee is a true believer and a complete one-off. I doubt anyone else could have built an entity like Creation and ran it for so long, making it all up as they went along. Essential reading for anyone interested in the heady, vulgar, marvellous miasma of British music and culture in the nineties, before it was all swamped by the surgical spirit sterility of the global marketplace' Irvine Welsh

‘In the 1980's Alan McGee saved British music by pumping ambition, passion and chaos into the independent scene. Without him Go West and Living In A Box would have won. A brilliant read for anyone interested in music’ James Brown

'It's fast and loose and as insane as the label, full of great anecdotes and machine gun prose - it tells it like it was and it doesn't flinch from the truth' John Robb

From mixing sound for My Bloody Valentine on mushrooms, via driving motorists off the road by commissioning billboard posters of Kevin Rowland flashing his pants, to escorting Carl Barat to A&E with one eyeball hanging out of its socket, the book bursts with tall-but-true tales . . . McGee's delivery of the dark moments he couldn't talk his way out of is just as powerful . . . another dazzling performance. (NME)

McGee's infamous frankness [is] to the fore as he dishes the dirt on the sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll that surrounded him, his label and his bands for a long time . . . Self-aware, brutally honest and full of passion, this is a book that cuts to the heart of the music industry with style. (Big Issue)

Book Description

The outspoken and outrageously entertaining autobiography of the founder of Creation Records.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 8243 KB
  • Print Length: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Sidgwick & Jackson; Main Market ed edition (7 Nov. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00DCRGEQ2
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 38 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #27,628 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I would imagine that this is the sort of book that you wouldn't buy your granny for Christmas, but then if you know who Alan McGee is then you probably know roughly what to expect!

Very much a grim start to his life in the 60's in Glasgow and he doesn't hold back on this part of the story, I think this shows why he became so driven and broke free like he did. Perhaps this energy and drive also partially propelled him to the inevitable crash (that isn't a spoiler by the way - there's much more to the book than that chapter of his life!)....

This is jam-packed with stories from his time from the formation of Creation Records, Britpop, the gigs, the parties , the drugs, drink and the rockstars. He is very matter-of-fact about his life but humble with it and despite the prolific use of drugs and more latterly drink, he doesn't seem to have been too warped by the experience and perhaps offers a cautionary tone to others who might read his path.

He is a true raconteur and anyone who has an interest in the bands that he was involved in will love this book. His writing style is easy going (even if some might find the content a little uncomfortable at times) and perfectly captures the dizzying highs and terrifying lows of life in the music fast lane.
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Alan McGee is known for giving Primal Scream and Oasis to the world, but this excellently-written book gives so much more about the trials of running a record label when competing against majors and also how the music business has changed. I enjoyed the anecdotes and the chaos of his earlier life as well as his self-awareness and realisation that the music could still be great without the drink and drugs. This is a great insight into the business itself and is tightly-written - there is no fat that needed to be edited out, I really enjoyed every page.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Really quite dull. I was there for a lot of the stuff in this book, and rockin' Alan has managed to make it all a lot duller than it really was.
I've always thought that Biff Bang Pow were an underrated band, but Mcgee is an over rated writer. I guess we are still waiting for the definitive book on this period.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Though Creation Records is one of my favourite labels I'm very wary of McGee and his frequent tall tales so approached this book with a dose of cynicism - but I was proved (mainly) wrong. It was a really easy, enjoyable and at times funny read. I certainly didn't get the impression that McGee was bulls***ting too much. You get a real mix of his character in the book, frequently arrogant, sometimes deluded (eg. the quality of dance music on Creation), even humble in places but almost always engaging. Lots of interesting accounts of his relationships with bands and record companies (an apparent inferiority complex with Geoff Travis/Rough Trade). I was certainly left wondering what caused the real rift between Liam Gallagher and Damon Albarn that McGee wouldn't/couldn't tell us. Towards the end there is lots of name dropping of 'real stars' but this surprisingly doesn't irritate too much as McGee actually comes across as a rather excited child. McGee almost spoils it in the end by describing himself now as a 'property dealer' and someone needs to tell him that 'clucking' is heroin withdrawal symptoms not relapse. It could have also done with the pompous quote on the cover from that idiot Gillespie.

Its a very quick, easy read and covers most the interesting bands. If you want to delve deeper into Creation records buy the excellent David Cavanagh book 'My Magpie Eyes...'.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
As I read Alan McGee's autobiography I realised just how much of the output of Creation Records I really loved: the Jesus and Mary Chain, Ride, Primal Scream, Super Furry Animals, My Bloody Valentine, Oasis, Ed Ball, Kevin Rowland, and so on. A lot of these artists owe whatever they achieved to the vision and passion of Alan McGee. He has quite a tale to tell too. Complete self reinvention that starts with an ordinary, tough Glaswegian 60s/70s upbringing complete with a violent and abusive father to hanging out with Tony Blair at 10 Downing Street.

This being a rock 'n' roll tome, it has an extraordinary amount of debauchery, drugs, madness, and for most of the participants - including Alan McGee - a breakdown or rehab. Alan's was more spectacular than most and it ultimately resulted in a drink and drugs free recovery. Some books of this type pull their punches but not this one. There are some great stories of Creation's outlaw heyday.

Alan's post-Creation life is also covered, however this is less compelling, but still interesting, in particular his short-lived tenure managing The Libertines (the dysfunctional relationship between Carl Barat and Pete Doherty puts the battling Gallagher brothers completely into the shade).

If you like the music, and you're interesting in the post-punk independent UK music scene, then you will find much to enjoy in Creation Stories: Riots, Raves and Running a Label.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I blame Tony Wilson. If he hadn't written the (great) 24 Hour Party People, there wouldn't be the current vogue for record label kiss-and-tells. You can understand the appeal of the genre - credible name + insider insights + nostalgia factor + favourite bands = fun times a-go-go... but what distinguishes '24 Hour Party People' (and fails to distinguish pretty much any of its successors) is that Tony Wilson COULD ACTUALLY SPIN A HALF-DECENT YARN. Coincidence that he had years of telly presenting behind him before he began his label..? Quite.

'Creation Stories', then, is a tepid affair at best, offering little insight into Creation's bands or the music and scant self-insight from McGee himself. I guess it's his blunt (at times thuggish) narcissism that makes him think that his talents extent to writing - when they don't, they don't, they don't. There's no narrative propulsion here at all... it's just a long slow sine wave of a tale from 'mediocrity' to 'success' and back to 'mediocrity' again. Having given up on quite a lot of books recently, I stuck with it through to the bitter (bland...) end - but now find myself wishing I hadn't wasted the time.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover