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The Creation Records Story: My Magpie Eyes are Hungry for the Prize Paperback – 4 Oct 2001

4.3 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 795 pages
  • Publisher: Virgin Books; New edition edition (4 Oct. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0753506459
  • ISBN-13: 978-0753506455
  • Product Dimensions: 19.4 x 12.9 x 6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 80,793 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

About the Author

David Cavanagh is one of the most respected and talented rock writers in Britain. Working for magazines like Q, Select, Sound and Mojo, he has proven himself a journalist of rare insight, style and integrity and conducted a huge number of entertaining and memorable interviews. He was also the chief researcher on the hit TV series Never Mind The Buzzcocks. His definitive account of the legendary Creation record label draws on three years extensive research, involving nearly 200 interviews with Alan McGee and other Creation luminaries.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I bought this book thinking it would be your standard record label history. Beware: it's incredibly long, incredibly detailed, and fairly heavy. That said, it's incredibly readable. Cavanagh does a great job setting the scene, introducing the players, and establishing what happened. Not just a history of Creation, this is a great snapshot of a certain period in music and culture. If you're interested in any of these things, buy this book. Just know in advance that you'll spend a lot of time reading it.
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Format: Paperback
dave cavanaugh has written what is easily the best-written non-fiction book about indie music ever. as a music obsessive myself, i've read them all (and most seem to have been written with some aplomb by the unofficial factory scribe mick middles) - the factory story, morrissey and marr, liverpool explodes - a shelf full. this one takes quite more than its share of cake.
starting with rough trade and postcard, it contains incredibly readable descriptions of the origins of most of the important british indie labels (of its time period - it rightly within context ignores such worthies as wurlitzer jukebox), even if only touching upon some of them, woven into a compelling, page-turning history. honestly, one tires of reading egregious errors, cobbeled-together pastiches of previously written pieces and self-important "i was there" dribble. cavanagh instead relies on solid research, reporting and, as the backbone of the story, the biography of one of the most frustrating and entertaining characters in indie music, alan mcgee.
in passing, we learn about geoff travis, alan horne, and even a little bit about those other two giants of frustratingly bizarre self-promotion, anthony h. wilson and bill drummond. in detail, you get histories of the creation bands, as their stories and particularly those of the young (and not so young) artists within frame mcgee's mad wanderings in a worthy context. we follow bobby gillespie from age 15 to the present, the reid brothers through their fame and subsequent infamy, kevin shields and guy chadwick and the gallaghers and all the rest of the creation madhouse. amazing.
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Format: Hardcover
The size of a house brick, this book was a labour of love in the reading and, no doubt, in the writing.
I'm no major fan of Creation, nor of the majority of its bands, but I lap up music history and have been an admirer of David Cavanagh's writing since his days on Sounds. So I burdened Postie and ordered a copy. And had a job putting it down.
This is a chronological account of the label's genesis-to-demise, veering off willfully on tangents to present back-stories. It's packed with anecdote - who knew that the House of Love's Guy Chadwick had a thing for getting naked at parties? - and interview, with band members, Creation staff and interested parties, while maintaining an authoritative air. Incredibly, given its near 800 pages, it's not exhaustive. Tim Vass, for instance, who is quoted often as having been an early mover on the scene, formed a band, Razorcuts, who were signed to Creation - who fail to get a mention. A lesser author would have slavishly documented each and every act in writing *The* Creation Records Story. My Magpie Eyes... is more of a soap opera, played out for real.
Neither is the book sensationalist - whatever that appallingly designed cover might suggest - the heavy cocaine use being documented rather than drooled over, with Oasis appearing only two-thirds in. (Neither Noel nor Liam provided original quotes and you wonder why.)
Forensic in its detail, vibrant in its colour, featuring a cast of trailblazers and madmen, this is a must-read for any budding music historian.
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Format: Hardcover
This is an excellent and compelling book. I managed to read it's 570 pages in 24 hours. A magnificent insight into the workings of one of the UK's most influential labels. An invaluable text to anyone who might be in a band themselves.
David Cavanagh kept up a thrilling narrative peopled with some truly amazing characters.
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