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Cradle Paperback – 13 Sep 1990

3.8 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Paperback, 13 Sep 1990
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Product details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Orbit; New edition edition (13 Sept. 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1857230728
  • ISBN-13: 978-1857230727
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 2 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,721,508 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Arthur C. Clarke is awesomely informed about physics and astronomy, and blessed with one of the most astounding imaginations ever encountered in print (NEW YORK TIMES)

For many readers Arthur C. Clarke is the very personification of science fiction (THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF SCIENCE FICTION)

Arthur C. Clarke is one of the truly prophetic figures of the space age ... The colossus of science fiction (NEW YORKER)

Book Description

A mind-blowing combination of scientific speculation and thriller, from two of the world's best writers of science fiction.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I sometimes hear people describe this kind of literature as depressing. I understand why they say this but at the same time I think that the perspective we gain through reading it is invaluable and education of this nature is really necessary in order to forge a realistic impression of the world we live in, or in other words, to gain some insight as to what has gone before and therefore had an influence on the way that world is formed. Some people find this genre genuinely difficult to consume and we are all free to choose what we read, unlike the poor prisoners who are the subjects of this work. One thing to be gained from reading this is that you become aware of how fortunate we are to live in a relatively free society. Something which occupies my mind is how the populations of all the territories of the former USSR will have inherited a deep psychological and/or subconscious trauma as a result of the `terror` diffused from above.
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Format: Paperback
I was a bit surprised that I ended up liking this book so much. I have owned it for probably close to ten years without reading it, and I have only recently read "Cancer Ward" by the same author without having been terribly impressed. But there is something about the way he writes in this book that not only makes it interesting, but also quite entertaining. I admire him for being able to take such a wealth of information, from such a variety of sources, and condensing it down to something which has some semblance of continuation and coherence. If it is not known to the prospective buyer, this is a non-fiction book, and it is basically about the history of the prison system in the former Soviet Union, and more specifically about the exaggerated cruelty and impossible conditions of the same system under Stalinist rule. It describes how and why people were arrested, the interrogations used for information and sentencing, the day to day life and conditions of various prisons, etc. Another thing I like about the way it was written is that the author very rarely becomes emotional, and how it is clear that he still loves his country (and possibly even communism) despite its many faults. He allows himself to look at various situations from the side of the "powers that be", and his objectivity is a welcome alternative to a constantly whining tone, which he could have very easily adopted, what with his personal experience.
Just one note on the translation: As far as I can tell, it was done well - there were very few parts where something was unclear, and even then it was only a word or two - all in all it flowed very well.
The main thoughts I had while reading this book were: Has there ever been a (white) country as screwed up as Russia? and: How have Russians survived through such merciless times?
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By A Customer on 26 Mar. 2001
Format: Paperback
Well, on reading this book, I can say that it is not like the Arthur Clarke I have come to know. You wouldn't normally find the f-word and sex in any Clarke novel. Nonetheless, it is an interesting and reasonably original idea, developed well, and with a truly inspiring ending which we should all take into our hearts. A good, readable yarn.
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Format: Paperback
I read it and it's a pity it isn't that good. Clarke's idea is fantastic and wonderful, yet it was Gentry Lee who wrote most of the book. (Since when did Arthur C. Clarke write about sex?) Good attempt, but Clarke should have written the whole thing.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Re-read this again after some years, with only fleeting memories of the the first time and was sadly disappointed - probably again. Lots of build up, characterisation, much of it irrelevant, and then it finishes just like that, leaving the reader thinking 'but what about....' and/or 'then what?'. Must remember not to read it again. Not a patch on most Arthur C Clarke books.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The greatest first hand account of life under Stalin ever produced. Searing in its implicity and brutal in its impact. A must read.
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