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A Course in Game Theory Paperback – 5 Sep 1994

4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: MIT Press; First Edition, Twelfth Printing edition (5 Sept. 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262650401
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262650403
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 450,539 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

" I recommend this book highly, it is beautifully done..." -- Robert Aumann, Hebrew University

& quot; I recommend this book highly, it is beautifully done...& quot; -- Robert Aumann, Hebrew University

"I recommend this book highly, it is beautifully done..."--Robert Aumann, Hebrew University

About the Author

Ariel Rubinstein is Professor of Economics at Tel Aviv University, Israel, and Princeton University.


Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book is really good to learn game theory from. I would recommend the reader look at Gibbons "primer in game theory" and Osborne "introduction to game theory" which broadly cover the same material but with more examples and with slightly different notation.

After covering This book, you can easily go thtough Mas-Colell chapter 7,8,9 which is VERY vigorously covers the same topics.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Really extensive book. It covers a complete advance course in Game Theory for PhD students.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Arrived safe and sound and at time.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x94f1b060) out of 5 stars 19 reviews
103 of 108 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x97e31db0) out of 5 stars A solid, concise textbook 22 Jun. 2000
By Valter Sorana - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This text is a solid introduction to game theory for mathematical economists at the graduate level (but apparently logicians love it, too). In principle, the book could be read by someone without any prior knowledge of game theory, but I would strongly advise such a reader to spend some time on a less "dry" text (such as Kreps's "A Course in Microeconomic Theory") before (or at least while) taking up this one.
The authors (like Myerson's "Game Theory" and unlike both Kreps and Fudenberg and Tirole's "Game Theory") cover both non-cooperative and cooperative game theory, with a nice balance.
Two topics not covered in other major texts are "Complexity Considerations In Repeated Games" (Chapter 9) and "Implementation Theory" (Chapter 10). The implementation theory chapter is a wonderful introduction to the topic, but is unfortunately limited to the perfect information case (mechanism design under imperfect information is covered by both Fudenberg-Tirole and Myerson.)
The only application of game theory to which the authors devote considerable space is bargaining (those who know the authors won't be surprised!) - and its treatment could have been a little less abstract.
In sum, it is a very good book that is not dominated by (nor dominates) any of its competitors cited above. If I were to teach a graduate game theory course, I would probably adopt it as the major text and supplement it with papers and parts of the other books.
28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x97e31e10) out of 5 stars An essential course in game theory. 28 Jan. 2003
By Joseph Clark - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This was one of the first books I read in Game Theory, and definitely the hardest. Those who want a gentle introduction to the concepts of modern game theory might do better with a simpler text such as Gibbons. That said, there is no substitute for quality. The depth of analysis is entirely necessary to get to the meat of the theory.
Osborne and Rubinstein write extremely well, softening the blows of some of the more complicated concepts. Their own substantial publication records in the Game Theory literature do much to recommend their version of analysis over others.
54 of 64 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9489a258) out of 5 stars Maybe for class but not for personal exploration... 2 Jun. 2003
By Delta Charlie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I agree with a previous review that this book is not good for individuals. Solutions to the excersizes are only available to educators. If the book is assigned for a class and the teacher has access to the solutions and can coach the student through the excersizes this is probably a great book because of it's depth. It is probably also a good reference book for those already familar with the subject.
However if you are like me and were looking for a strong book that will help a motivated individual learn game theory this book is not for you. I have tried many of the excersizes and I am still not positive that I my answers are correct. The material in the book is very complex but accessible, that is not the problem. The problem is the lack of development because I can not go over my answers to the excersizes and see what I did right and what I did wrong...
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9489a624) out of 5 stars Not as good as Osborne's solo effort 10 Mar. 2009
By Trevor Burnham - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ten years after this good came out, Osborne wrote An Introduction to Game Theory, a more comprehensive and focused book that also takes a more leisurely pace and provides more concrete problems. Some have said that this book is better suited to graduate students, while "An Introduction" is more appropriate to undergrads. Speaking as someone who's taken game theory at both an undergraduate and graduate level, I don't see any advantage to this book in either context. It is concise, yes, but it is also dense and suffers from the authors' disagreements over several fundamental issues.

If you are looking for an advanced textbook in game theory, then I'd strongly recommend Ken Binmore's recent effort, Playing for Real. It's wide-ranging and rich in challenging problems.
68 of 98 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9489a5d0) out of 5 stars Worthless for autodidactics 23 April 2002
By Christian Frei - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The book provides numerous excercises but solutions are only
available to course instructors. I.e. the book is worthless for autodidactics.
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