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Count Dracula 1977

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4.5 out of 5 stars (79) IMDb 5.8/10
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Widely acclaimed re-telling of the classic story from the 1970s. Generally regarded as being one of the better adaptations of Bram Stoker's classic tale, this version features a standout performance by Louis Jourdan as the Count, and benefits by remaining faithful to the original storyline. Jonathan Harker (Bosco Hogan) travels to Transylvania to help the Count prepare for his move to England. After succumbing to the Count's powers, Harker is kept prisoner in Dracula's castle before returning to England, determined to destroy the vampire.

Starring:
Susan Penhaligon, Louis Jourdan
Rental Formats:
DVD

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 2 hours 32 minutes
Starring Susan Penhaligon, Louis Jourdan, Frank Finlay, Jack Shepherd
Director Philip Saville
Genres Horror
Studio 2 ENTERTAIN VIDEO
Rental release 3 September 2007
Main languages English
Hearing impaired subtitles English

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
As a child I could never understand why so many versions of Dracula strayed so far from the novel. As much as I loved Chris Lee's films etc film makers seemed determined to avoid the original plot.
When I settled down that Christmas years ago to watch the BBC's Dracula I was over joyed to see such a faithful adaptation and a brilliant one at that. All the classic characters are there (including Renfield), they filmed in Whitby, its gory, sexy, romantic and frightening. It's done with style and class. It is a proper vampire film unlike all these Super hero martial arts vampire flicks today.
I bought it when it appeared on DVD a few years ago. I am glad to see it coming out again and hope it reaches a whole new audience.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The BBC has always maintained a pretty solid reputation of providing great drama and adaptations of the classics and this 1977 version of stokers novel is a prime example.
"Count Dracula" is regarded by many as the most faithful working of the horror story to date and although lacking the menace of Christopher Lee's vampire, Louis Jourdan makes very good casting indeed.
But what really makes this adaptation so good? - well firstly the cast is a good one. Frank Finlay seems to be having a great time in the role as Van Helsing, while Judi Bowker and Susan Penhaligon make good vampire fodder. Also Jack Shepherd plays Renfield to perfection. But what i really love about this production are the outdoor locations. The shots of Mina and Lucy going up the huge flight of cliff steps at whitby and sitting on the clifftop bench overlooking the sea is just how you envisage stoker's novel- just as in the scene where Dracula first seduces a sleepwalking lucy in the clifftop churchyard in the dead of night. Also the confrontation between the vampire hunters and an undead Susan Penhaligon in londons Highgate cemetry is quite chilling, especially the scene where they drive a stake into her as it looks very convincing.
Lame special effects such as rubber bats and a dreadful mist effect coming though a bedroom window don't particularly help the production but one must think of the time this was made. All in all, a very good effort and this certainly ranks high above recent attempts at the dracula story.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is the three-part mini-series that was originally broadcast on BBC TV in 1977 - and is one of the most faithful adaptations of Bram Stoker's novel "Dracula". If you're a fan of the book, or the character more generally, then I highly recommend this DVD.

The plot adheres to the storyline of the original novel. Count Dracula is seeking to enact his evil plans, which involve him coming to England - which, in the Victorian era, was the hub of the civilised world. And so he seeks to ensure his safety - by buying various properties, mainly in and around London, that will serve as his 'safe houses'. To arrange the property transactions, a young solicitor - Jonathan Harker - travels to the Count's castle in Transylvania ... and it's with Harker's journey that this mini-series begins.

The high production values are obvious, and it is clear that both time and care were taken to ensure that this mini-series captured the 'feel' of Stoker's tale. The acting is also excellent - especially by the beautiful Judi Bowker (who plays Mina). My only point of (minor) criticism concerns the casting of Louis Jourdan as Dracula - for, although he offers a good performance, his Mediterranean looks and French accent don't quite 'fit' with the character of the east European Count.

This is the best dramatization of "Dracula" - and it remains a great piece of TV entertainment. It ought to be available on Blu-ray.
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By Armchair Pundit VINE VOICE on 5 Jun. 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
At last, although it's been a while since I last saw this. I had never forgotten it,
especially the scene where Harker looks out of his castle window and see's Dracula clinging to the walls.
Louis Jourdan breathes new life into the titular character.
(With just the right air of a European nobleman, polite, curteous but with an arrogant streak).
This was the first time I'd seen the delightful Judy Bowker on TV since Black Beauty.
The ever reliable Frank Finlay plays a wonderful Van Helsing.
(His 1971 Casanova is worth a look too.)
And Jack Shepherd really excels as Renfield.
If you have never read the novel, then this is the most accurate version I have ever seen.
Bram Stokers characters and prose are faithfully transferred to the small screen.
Production values are typically BBC late 70's, videotape and stagey, but it's the story and acting quality I buy for,
and not a slightly dodgy TV stage set!
Original airdate:~ 22/12/77.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
this is far superior to the most recent bbc attempt at this classic tale-ok,the special effects(though very few)are worthy of an early 90's home camcorder effects but at least it stays true to the novel(apart from the non-appearance of lord godalming)which is more than can be said of last years misguided nightmare. worth a look!
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Format: DVD
After the disappointment at the BBC's 2006 version of the Bram Stoker novel, an antidote is now on offer in the form of the Beeb's previous visitation to the tale back in 1977 and one regarded by many as the best adaptation ever. Directed by Philip Saville, Count Dracula stars Louis Jordan as the titular vampire with Frank Finlay as arch nemesis Van Helsing. The BBC promised at the time that this would be the most faithful adaptation of Bram Stoker's work ever and at a running time of two and a half hours (later serialised into three episodes for repeats) it certainly proved the case.

Jordan acquits himself with an understated performance that has had many praise him as one of the very best Counts. He wisely avoids the "Drrrracula" accent that Lugosi turned into a cliché and simply allows his French flavoured tones to signal his character's otherness. Jordan's youthful for his age looks also give the impression of a man older than he apparently seems.

Frank Finlay is memorable as Van Helsing, but any awards for supporting actors must go to Jack Shepherd as Renfield. Like Jordan, Shepherd avoids the usual over the top performance that most actors have invested in the part. This is a strangely calm lunatic, seemingly reasonable rather than ranting but with a power behind those eyes; a perfect foil for Jordan's Dracula. In the scene where Dracula kills Renfield in his own cell, the Count suddenly appears sat next to his servant and asks calmly why he betrayed him. More like someone giving counselling than about to take revenge.

An this is another point about Gerald Savory's script. While it stays close to the novel, it does not stick too close for its own good.
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