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Corporate Warriors: The Rise of Privatized Military Industry: The Rise of the Privatized Military Industry (Cornell Studies in Security Affairs) Paperback – 29 Nov 2007

4.0 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 360 pages
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1st Revised edition edition (29 Nov. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801474361
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801474361
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 0.5 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 403,134 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"The first notable book on the subject."-The Financial Times, 11 August 2003

"Provides a thoughtful, engaging critique of the U.S. government's growing dependence on private companies to wage war. Mercenaries in the employ of the Pentagon have made news with every new controversy in Iraq, from the ambush that sparked the siege of Fallujah to the prisoner abuses in Abu Ghraib prison and the raid on Ahmed Chalabi's offices. The involvement of those for-profit fighters has inspired plenty of political vitriol, much of it directed at Halliburton, Vice-President Dick Cheney's former employer. But there are some less-well-known players here, too: DynCorp, MPRI, and ICI Oregon, which do everything from database work to intelligence-gathering." Business Week, 28 June 2004"

"The creeping military-industrial complex about which President Dwight Eisenhower warned us five decades ago has reached critical mass. In fact, P. W. Singer, a security analyst at the Brookings Institution, suggests that Ike would be flabbergasted by the recent proliferation of privatized military firms and their influence on public policy both here and abroad. Calling them the corporate evolution of old-fashioned mercenaries, Singer's illuminating new book, says they provide the service side of war rather than weapons." Christian Science Monitor, 14 August 2003"

"The first notable book on the subject." The Financial Times, 11 August 2003"

"Large-scale wars may still be the sole provenance of sovereign governments, but many countries are now quietly outsourcing smaller-scale functions to privatized military firms (PMFs), which do not carry the same political weight as national troops. These firms might build camps, provide supplies, or furnish combat troops, technical assistance, or expert consultants for training programs. This is a new area for policymakers to debate and scholars to explore. . . . This portrait of the military services industry is well documented with many footnotes and a lengthy bibliography." Library Journal, July 2003"

"Provides a sweeping survey of the work of MPRI, Airscan, Dyncorp, Brown and Root, and scores of other firms that can variously put troops in the field, build and run military bases, train guerrilla forces, conduct air surveillance, mount coups, stave off coups, and put back together the countries that wars have just destroyed." The Atlantic Monthly, October 2003"

"After reading this book, it is impossible to see the landscape of insurgencies, civil wars, and inter-state wars the same way again. Peter Singer's book is a rare find: a study of the breakdown of the state monopoly on war that challenges basic assumptions in international relations theory; an exploration of the many different ways in which privatized military firms pose both problems and opportunities for policymakers; and a fascinating read for anyone interested in the changing nature of both international security and international politics." Anne-Marie Slaughter, Dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University"

"A must read for anyone interested in the art of war, Corporate Warriors is a fascinating analysis of a new, often secretive, global industry. Marked by impressive research, this path-breaking study describes a pattern of increasing reliance on private military firms by individuals, corporations, humanitarian groups, governments, and international organizations. This is a masterful book that will appeal to students, scholars, policymakers, and lay readers alike." Stephanie G. Neuman, Director of the Comparative Defense Studies Program, Columbia University"


Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a timely review of an increasingly prickly subject. Written in a style that the is neither too academic nor too populist the book strikes the right sober and dispassionate note in reviewing the entirety of the subject -- from messy little wars propping up dictators; to wars that the major states will not or cannot fight ("We don't do mountain warfare" as I believe a spokesman for the US forces is reported to have said in Afghanistan) to the preservation of life and the protection of humanitarian aid agencies. Throughout the entire text, Singer is objective and even-handed.
Much of the commercial information contained in the book is highly detailed and supported by extensive footnotes. The details of the commercial deals struck between client and mercenaries and the historical background -- both the near history and the far -- make fascinating reading.
My criticisms are that the book becomes slightly repetitive in driving points home. Better editing would have prevented that -- as it would some of the egregious errors of syntax, grammar and vocabulary that Mr Singer occasionally commits. But overall this is a very useful book for students in any of the disciplines of world affairs, international relations, business and management or ethics. It deserves a wide readership.
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Format: Hardcover
Singer does an excellent job of providing a sufficiently detailed review of the private military industry (nee mercenary sector) in this book. He starts off with the historical background and the cyclicality of their use and legitimacy over the millenia (with a focus on the last 8 centuries), to then progress to the reemergence of the sector in the late 1980s / early 1990s.

Subsequently the reasons and enablers of a return of the private military enterprise are examined and he also presents a couple of case studies on representative firms from each sector. Subsequently he also examines implications and possible future developments. While he does attempt to construct some theoretical frameworks around it, those are but a small part of the book, and while they arguably do not add much to the quality of the book, they definitely do not make it a dry, academic publication.

Where Singer scores very highly in my opinion is in the analysis - all aspects are treated in sufficient depth to make their inclusion worthwhile and he presents a very even handed picture, without passing judgement either way. The book is not a piece of prescriptive writing, it allows the reader to form their own opinion, based on the very well researched and documented analysis of the sector.

As the other review mentions, one of the few downfalls is the occasionally grave oversight in spelling, grammar and the odd erroneous weapons system mentioned - however these occur on very few occasions and it seems like the odd page was completely overlooked in the editing process rather than these errors cropping up all over the book.

All in all a commendable performance, in light of other, rather lightweight books passing for analytical work these days.
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Format: Paperback
The book is a defense for private armies, like it or not, the book argues obejectively for the selective use of these armies. Why Because politics can become so complicated that no solution can be found.
The normal citizen doesn't nessecarily need one political leadership or the other, the normal citzen needs peace oan possibilities to live. So if at civil war can be ended, that's what is important.
Politics in developing countries sometimes end up in politicians fighting for power, not for the people.
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